ART-101: Drawing ISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of basic drawing techniques and fundamental concepts and relationships within the pictorial composition. Studio fee assessed.

ART-110: 2D Design Concepts, Color and CompositionSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An exploratory study of the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design through creative image generation using a variety of media and the study of the theory of color and light as perceived by the human eye. Color properties, systems, mixing, symbolism and psychology are studied through experimentation with materials and visual elements used by the artist and designer. Studio fee assessed.

ART-111: 3D Design Concepts and StructureSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the elements and principles of three-dimensional design. The various degrees of three-dimensional form are explored through reliefs to works that are in-the-round. Both fine and applied art objects are constructed in a variety of materials and construction processes. Students develop their sensitivity and awareness of spatial environments that transfer into many other fields and disciplines. Studio fee assessed.

ART-131: Digital Photography ISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Introduces the use of the digital SLR camera, lighting, and composition; digital techniques for image processing, making digital prints; print finishing and presentation.  Emphasis upon the use of the photographic process as an artistic medium. Student must have a digital SLR camera with at least 10-megapixel resolution, histogram display, RAW file format and manual capability (adjustable shutter speeds and lens openings). Studio fee assessed.

ART-142: History of Architectural Interiors & FurnishingsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of architectural interiors and furnishings from antiquity to present.  Relationship of architecture, art, and furniture styles to interiors.  Survey of contemporary furniture designers.  Also offered as ID-142.

ART-144: Interior Design ISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An exploration of the basic elements and principles of interior design.  Includes application of design principles to human environments. Emphasis on design solutions relevant to human needs. Introduction to architectural drawing. Six studio hours per week. Also offered as ID-144

ART-160: Ceramics ISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Basic understanding of construction in clay is accomplished through hand building, throwing on the wheel, and experimental techniques.  Glazing and firing are integral elements of the course. May be repeated for credit. Studio fee assessed.

ART-170: The Art and Culture of WeavingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

An introduction to weaving with a focus on the history and evolution of the textile.  Projects will seek to give you technical information while allowing you to experiment with color, design and concept.  Studio fee assessed.

ART-180: Computer Literacy for DesignSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In this course students will become knowledgeable about how to use the computer as a tool for design solutions. Students will explore basic design principles with typography and image manipulation. Students will work with their own art and images to learn how to efficiently and economically scan, manipulate, digitize, organize, design, and print their own artwork with the computer. Students will learn basics of the editing software Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator and web design software. Successful completion of this course demonstrates technology fluency requirements. Studio fee assessed.

ART-201: Drawing IISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

An extension of the concepts and techniques encountered in Drawing I. Color is introduced through various media. May be repeated once for credit to explore additional media, techniques and processes with permission of instructor. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-101.

ART-210: Painting ISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to basic oil painting techniques. May be repeated for credit.  Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-101, ART-110.

ART-221: Survey Western Art: Ancient-Early RenaissanceSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A survey of the history of western architecture, sculpture, and painting from circa 2400 B.C. to 1500 A.D.  In addition to examining art within its historical context and exploring human cultural diversity, students will gain fundamental skills of visual analysis, acquiring the vocabulary and concepts needed to discuss works of art orally and in writing.

ART-222: Survey Western Art: High Renaissance-ModernSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A survey of the history of western architecture, sculpture, and painting from circa 1450 to the post-modern present.  In addition to examining art within its historical context and exploring human cultural diversity, students will gain fundamental skills of visual analysis, acquiring the vocabulary and concepts needed to discuss works of art orally and in writing.

ART-230: Digital Photography IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An extension of the concepts and techniques encountered in ART-131, with an emphasis on the pursuit of photography as a fine art form. Student must have a digital SLR camera with at least 10-megapixel resolution, histogram display, RAW file format and manual capability (adjustable shutter speeds and lens openings). Studio fee assessed.  Prerequisite: ART-131.

ART-242: Graphic Design and TypographySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides students an intensive introduction into the fundamental principles of graphic design and typography with an emphasis on the relationship between form and communication as a means to visual problem-solving. The focus will be on developing the ability to skillfully manipulate communicative tools such as hierarchy, typography, color, composition, scale, and rhythm, to visually communicate a message in a meaningful and powerful way. Visual explorations take place through the creation of theoretical and applied projects which are designed to aid in the development of a working creative process. These assignments will be supplemented by short readings, lectures, critiques and class discussions aimed at fostering critical engagement with the visual work produced in class, as well as providing an introduction to graphic design theory and history. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-110, ART-180.

ART-248: IllustrationSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

The development of technical rendering skills for the illustrator or designer using various media and materials including ink, colored pencil, and marker. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-110 or ID-243.

ART-251: Printmaking ISession(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of printmaking. The students will be challenged to think conceptually, as well as demonstrate their knowledge of the elements and principles of design. Studio fee assessed.  Prerequisites: ART-101 and ART-110.

ART-270: FibersSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to techniques of fiber and textile arts.  Through production of one-of-a-kind textile pieces, students learn fabric processes in surface design, construction and dyeing.  Techniques include, but are not limited to embroidery, screen printing, digital printing, felting, and tie-dye using natural and chemical dye processes.  This course also includes study of contemporary and historical textiles from around the world.  Studio fee assessed.  Prerequisite: ART-110.

ART-280: Topics in Art and ArchitectureSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Rotating topics focused on the art and architecture or art historical theory and methods from western or non-western cultures. An emphasis is placed on understanding art in context, critical thinking, and building skills of visual literacy as well as oral and written communication. May be repeated for credit.

ART-299: Introduction to Research in ArtSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to pursue original research in the field of art.  In conjunction with a faculty member, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an intermediate level of complexity.  The project will require a culminating experience appropriate to the field of artistic study, such as a paper or artistic object or performance and a presentation or exhibition.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-110, and ART-221 or ART-222.

ART-301: Figure DrawingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This studio course is an introduction to life drawing for the intermediate drawing student. Working from a model, students will develop an understanding of the structure, proper proportion and anatomy of the human figure. The course will also explore the expressive potential of the human form.  Prerequisite: ART-101.

ART-310: Painting IISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An extension of the concepts and techniques encountered in ART-210 with an emphasis on furthering skill and individual expression. May be repeated for credit.  Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-110, ART-210.

ART-315: History of CostumeSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of the history of European and American costume in relation to religious, political, technological, and artistic movements from the Egyptian period [2700 B.C.] to the 20th century. Also offered as FMD-315.

ART-323: Topics in Art HistorySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Designed to provide a variety of specific upper-level art history studies. Topics are chosen from four major periods: ancient, medieval, renaissance, and baroque.  Beyond gaining an understanding of the historical and theoretical foundations of the art works from a particular period, students will also become acquainted with many other contextual factors including aspects of religious, social, political, and economic life.  May be repeated for credit. May be taken without prerequisite courses with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: ART-221 or ART-222.

ART-324: Topics in Modern Art HistorySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A variety of subjects related to art, women, and contemporary aesthetic and societal issues will be addressed.  Beyond gaining a better understanding of the historical and theoretical foundations of modern art, this course seeks to help each student become more proficient in analytical and critical skills of thinking and writing. Topics are on rotation and may be repeated for credit. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: ART-221 or ART-222.

ART-330: Topics in PhotographySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

The emphasis in this course will vary by semester through exploration of different photographic techniques and processes.  The student will work to achieve distinctive personal style for portfolio development. [ART-230 is not required to take this course.]  May be repeated for credit. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-131.

ART-332: Photography and Social ChangeSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Student learn how to photograph for the web while volunteering at a local county animal shelter. In this course students will gain skills with digital cameras, adobe photoshop, web color management, and blogging, all while analyzing the effects of animal overpopulation within our communities.

ART-344: Advanced Graphic DesignSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course hones students’ abilities to explore advanced visual communication problems that integrate typographic, photographic, and historical concepts in graphic design with an emphasis on the relationship between form and communication as a means to visual problem-solving. Projects reflect applications with specific audiences, contexts, and production criteria. Visual explorations take place through the creation of theoretical and applied projects. These assignments will be supplemented by short readings, lectures, critiques and class discussions aimed at fostering critical engagement with the visual work produced in class. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-110,  ART-180, and ART-242. May be repeated for credit.

ART-345: Advanced TypographySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course encourages students to solve design problems by creating typographic solutions as the primary vehicle for expressive and functional communication. Students strengthen skills in building typographic relationships and detail and creating sophisticated typographic layouts, including dynamic use of the grid. Emphasis is placed on typographic systems and publication design. Visual explorations take place through the creation of theoretical and applied projects. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-242.

ART-351: Printmaking IISession(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

An in depth examination of mixed media processes and how contemporary artists are using them.  This may include a variety of processes: engraving, pronto plates, aquatints, dry-point and monotype. May be repeated for credit with permission from the instructor. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-110 and ART-251.

ART-360: Interactive DesignSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course explores the technical and conceptual aspects of web design and basic animation through a series of problem-solving processes. The course stresses the basics of web graphic and interactive web-based environments that demonstrate an understanding of navigation, design, usability, and functionality within a creative framework. Emphasis will be placed on the research and development of effective graphic interfaces and information architecture. Student will explore ways that animation/interactive design and digital imaging can complement experiences in various disciplines. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-180.

ART-362: Ceramics IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An extension of the techniques and concepts encountered in ART-160. Emphasis will be placed on gaining depth of experience and a personal approach. May be repeated for credit. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-160.

ART-365: SculptureSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to sculptural forms and object making.  Traditional and contemporary materials and processes will be explored that may include: clay modeling, hot and cold casting, wood or stone carving, hot and cold metal fabrication and assembling, and mixed-media.  Relationships between concept, visual organization and materials are studied. This course may be repeated for credit to investigate additional media, techniques and processes to develop a more advanced body of work and personal narrative. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-110, ART-111 or ART-160.

ART-370: Fibers IISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A continuation of techniques and concepts from ART-270. There will be a focus on conceptual contemporary textiles and fiber arts and artists. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-110, ART-270.

ART-382: Art Ethics SeminarSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This seminar course includes an introduction to professional organizations, professional development, and research on historical and contemporary ethical topics relating to art such as: professional careers and ethical codes, aesthetic theory and artistic practices, the creative process, and post graduate studies. This course is Writing Intensive (WI).   Students and departmental faculty will formally review the student’s selected body of work.  Students will assess and reflect upon strengths in their work and identify areas for additional studies in upper-level studio courses and/or research in preparation for their senior year.  Substantial emphasis is placed on using these reflections to create an artist statement and artwork that is exhibition ready.  Prerequisites: The student must have enough credit hours to be deemed a Junior and have declared a major in Art. All junior level art majors must complete this course prior to taking ART 497 Senior Exhibition (for Art Education and Studio Art majors) or ART 490 Senior Project in Graphic Design (for Graphic Design majors).

ART-400: Circus Design Studio at MeredithSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is a working in-house graphic design studio managed and staffed by advanced graphic design majors and a full-time faculty member to work with campus and community clients. The purpose of Circus Design Studio is to assess needs in the department, college, and local community and to fulfill those needs through the design and implementation of various print and interactive collateral. The Studio’s mission is to produce high quality design for events, services, and programs of clients. Studio fee assessed. Pre-requisites: ART-242, ART-344, ART-345, Graphic Design major or minor, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

ART-401: Figure Drawing IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is an extension of the concepts and techniques encountered in ART-301 with an emphasis on furthering skills and individual expression. Advanced exploration may include working with a variety of processes and media, including painting, clay modeling, and mixed media. Students will create a series of works focusing on developing a personalized concept regarding the contemporary use of the figure. Critical research and writing required. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-301. Studio fee assessed.

ART-405: Colton ReviewSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course provides a real-world design experience that includes collaborating with the English Department to produce a printed document, The Colton Review, A Journal of Art and Literature, for Meredith College. Students work in teams to fulfill the roles of art director(s) and graphic designers. Prerequisites: ART-180, ART-242, and ART-444, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

ART-444: Special Topics in Graphic DesignSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides students with advanced research in graphic design special topics. The topic of this course may vary from semester to semester. Each course focuses on various issues in the field of graphic design and allows students to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. Projects reflect applications with specific audiences, contexts, and production criteria. Special emphasis is placed on the social/cultural role graphic designers play in their communities and their world. Visual explorations take place through the creation of theoretical and applied projects. These assignments will be supplemented by short readings, lectures, critiques and class discussions aimed at fostering critical engagement with the visual work produced in class. Studio fee assessed. Pre-requisites: ART-110, ART-180, and ART-242. May be repeated for credit.

ART-460: Advanced Interactive DesignSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This advanced course builds on the fundamentals presented in ART-360 Interactive Design. It is designed to explore creative and communicative experiences as they apply to experimental screen-based projects, digital branding, strategy, and design developed for various content, needs, and audiences. Emphasis will be placed on problem-seeking/problem-solving processes using industry-standard interactive applications. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: ART-360. Open to Graphic Design majors; others with permission of instructor.

ART-480: Digital Photography IIISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This advanced level course provides students with a strong foundation in the latest digital workflow methods from advanced digital capture and image editing to master digital printing. Emphasis is placed on exploring digital photography as a medium for creative expression. A digital SLR camera with at least 10-megapixel resolution, histogram display, RAW file format, and manual capability [adjustable shutter speeds and lens openings] is required for this course. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-131, ART-230.

ART-482: Professional Practices and Portfolio Development in Studio ArtSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

All Studio Art majors should register for this course during their senior year. Students will be instructed on the basic business practices of art, understand the legal rights and procedures for the artist, practice presentation and marketing methods, prepare a portfolio of work, be informed about a wide range of art careers and graduate study opportunities, develop strategies for success post-graduate in chosen concentration area. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-382 and Senior status.

ART-490: Senior Project in Graphic DesignSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The senior project is a capstone class for Graphic Design majors which integrates the accumulated skills and knowledge obtained and cultivated previously in the curriculum. By developing a unique semester-long project, students have the opportunity to engage present and future professional interests. Student projects are self-initiated, self-defined, and self-directed. The scale of proposed project (scope and reach) and its final articulation (context, content, and form) are to be developed and executed through consultation with the instructor. All Graphic Design majors should register for this course during their senior year. Students graduating in the Spring should take the course in the semester that they graduate. Students who graduate in the Fall should take the course the semester before they graduate. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: Graphic Design major and Senior Status. Note: Honors Graphic Design majors should register for ART 498.

ART-491: Professional Practices and Portfolio Development in Graphic DesignSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In this course students will develop a professional portfolio of work, create a self-identity system, design a business application suite, and explore graphic design business practices. Working individually with the instructor each student reviews representative projects that showcase personal methodology and demonstrates overall conceptual abilities and technical competencies within their work. Professional design practices, such as the development of a resume, cover letter and business contracts, preparing for interviews, presenting and selling yourself, working with clients, and producing a unique self-promotional portfolio piece will also be addressed. All Graphic Design majors should register for this course during their senior year.  Students graduating in the spring should take the course in the semester that they graduate. Students who complete their degree in the fall should take the course the semester before they graduate. Studio fee assessed.  Pre-requisites: Graphic Design major and Senior Status. Co-requisite: ART-490.

ART-494: Senior Project: Art History ThesisSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to junior and senior Art History minors, Medieval & Renaissance Studies minors or others with permission. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will research an in-depth exploration of an art history topic and write a formal research paper. The student will orally present the topic and her conclusions in a public forum.

ART-495: Portfolio PhotographySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides students with the basic information necessary for making high quality digital photographs of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and presentation of a professional digital portfolio. Topics include use of the digital 35mm SLR camera, the copy stand, lighting, metering with a gray card, exposure, depth-of-field, and preparing digital slide files. Students should complete the course with excellent skills for photographing all types of artwork. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status.

ART-497: Senior ExhibitionSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Senior exhibition is a culminating practicum experience that combines the exploration of professional practices in gallery and museum exhibition design and gallery management, as well as learning how to curate a body of work to be installed in a gallery.  This course is required for Art Education and Studio Art majors.  Art programming appropriate for art education, gallery and/or museum education will be researched and applied in their senior exhibition.  Self-promotion strategies and materials will be developed for an artist’s gallery talk for the exhibition.  Studio fee assessed.  Prerequisites: ART 382 and senior status, and ART 482 for Studio Art majors.

ART-498: Honors Thesis in ArtSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to seniors or qualified juniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows programs majoring in art. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper, artistic object or performance, and an exhibition or presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the art department faculty. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-110 (for studio-based projects only), ART-221 and ART-222.

ART -499: Junior & Senior Research in ArtSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to junior and senior majors and minors, or others with permission.  In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper or artistic object or performance and an exhibition or presentation.  The precise nature of the culminating activity is dependent upon the artistic field and inquiry of study as deemed appropriate by the faculty mentor.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required.  May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisites: ART-101, ART-110 (for studio-based projects only), ART-221 or ART-222.

ART-735: Teaching and Methods: Art PreK – 5Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The relationship between creative behavior and child growth through the visual arts is developed through research, practicum situations, and extensive early field experience. Methods for teaching exceptional children are also studied. Curriculum development is an integral part of the class. Twelve hours of studio art must be completed prior to registering for this class. Offered in rotation with ART-734, ART-736. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-221 or ART-222.  Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

ART-736: Teaching and Methods: Art in Grades 6-12Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of teaching methodologies appropriate for middle and high school students through research, practicum situations, and extensive early field experiences. Attention is given to adolescent development and its effect on creative visual development and the need for visual expression. Art health hazards, computer competencies and curriculum development are among topics covered. Twelve hours of studio art must be completed before registering for this course. Studio fee assessed. Offered in rotation with ART-734 and ART-735. Prerequisites: ART-221 or ART-222.  Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

ART-920: Directed Individual StudySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

ART -930: Community InternshipSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

COM-100: Introduction to Communication StudiesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This team-taught course will include an introduction to the scientific study of various disciplines in the field of communication. These include such topics as interpersonal communication, nonverbal communication, public communication, persuasion, public relations and mass communication.

COM-215: Introduction to Public RelationsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides an overview of the field of public relations, including history of the field, current trends, and career opportunities.  Effective principles and ethical issues in public relations are illustrated through case study examples.

COM-225: Public SpeakingSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A basic introduction to communication, primarily through public speaking, that stresses organization and delivery of spoken messages. Units include informative speaking, special occasion speaking, the use of language in oral style, audience analysis, and the use of logic and critical thinking in persuasive communication.

COM-235: Applied Quantitative ResearchSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

In this course, students will learn to use quantitative data through participation in an applied research project. Students will identify appropriate quantitative data to answer a research question and then use technological tools to organize, analyze and present that data. By the conclusion of the course students will generate a tangible product showcasing their participation in this project. Also offered as HIS 235, POL 235 and SOC 235.

COM-260: Interpersonal CommunicationSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to relational communication.  The student should increase her sensitivity of communication skills by questioning habits, traditions, and current ideas and behaviors related to personal perception and communication.  Through lectures, discussion, activities, and exercises, students will attain the knowledge and skills to become more effective communicators.  They will also increase their awareness of everyday communication behaviors.

COM-290: Introduction to Mass CommunicationSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the field of mass communication that deals with the examination of radio, newspapers, magazines, film, television and the internet. The course includes historical backgrounds of each division, career opportunities, current trends, and predictions. It is designed to enhance student appreciation of the various components of mass media.

COM-295: Career Planning and PortfolioSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is designed to help new communication majors get established in the program by; 1) introducing the department’s academic portfolio process, 2) developing students’ academic course plans and 3) coaching students in their creation of personal and professional goals. This seminar also introduces research on emotional intelligence (EQ) and explores how EQ is connected to personal wellness and professional success. Learners will participate in an individual assessment of emotional intelligence and use the results along with Strengths Finder to develop goals focused on success in college and beyond. Prerequisite: COM majors only.

COM-299: Communication Research ProjectSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will conduct an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the mentor is required for registration. Prerequisite: COM-330.

COM-300: Small Group CommunicationSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Theory and practice of effective communication in small groups,  including stages of group development, role emergence, leadership functions, decision making strategies, conflict management, and the significance of power.

COM-316: PR TechniquesSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In this course, students will  learn a range of tools PR practitioners use in their day-to-day activities in preparing materials for print, broadcast and online media. Students will also gain skills in managing media relations, crisis situations, and event planning.

COM-320: Media LawSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the history and development of media law in the United States since the early 1900s.  Readings and lectures include the First Amendment, libel law, copyright protection, different regulations regarding print and electronic media, regulation of obscene and erotic material, the Freedom of Information Act, the regulation of advertising and telecommunication regulation.  Covered topics include, to some degree, the role of ethics and morality as they apply to current media practices such as industry mergers and censorship issues.

COM-330: Communication Research MethodsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the basics of research in the field of communication, students learn a variety of research methods including both qualitative and quantitative methods as well as gain hands-on experience in the research process. This course will better prepare students for upper-level communication courses by familiarizing them with the language and process of research done in the field. The course gives students the skills needed to successfully complete their own research for their senior thesis.

COM-350: Business and Professional CommunicationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The nature of communication theory and practice in business and professional settings.  Development of individual, dyadic, group, and organizational communication proficiencies.  Supervisory/subordinate and peer communication, active listening, group communication, and presentational speaking. Pre-requisite: COM-225.

COM-360: Writing for the MediaSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The theory and practice of writing for print and broadcast media on an introductory level.  Areas of study involve writing for newspapers, magazines, radio news, television news, documentaries, film, and public relations. The course is taught in a seminar-workshop environment.

COM-365: Digital Media ConvergenceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Convergence is the blending of text, sounds, still and motion images in the media environment to create integrated media. This course features units on visual literacy, photo editing, audio processing, video editing and web publishing. Students learn theories of audio and visual aesthetics and produce individual content for the web.

COM-370: Nonverbal CommunicationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Theory and research in nonverbal communication, including environment, space, physical appearance, body movement, eyes and facial expressions, and social cues.  Nonverbal communication in personal, workplace, and cultural settings.

COM-374: Forgiveness and CommunicationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A course focusing on the theories of interpersonal relationships by exploring the developmental, maintenance and deterioration stages. Explores both verbal and nonverbal messages, listening, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: Must be a junior/senior.

COM-375: Gender CommunicationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Effects of gender on the interpersonal communication process. Explanations of gender differences, communication about women and men via language and media, and interpersonal communication.

COM-380: Interactive & Social MediaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course focuses on developing Social Media content for information sharing, branding, and marketing. Along with readings and discussion of research regarding interactive and social media, students will develop their own social media presence and writing.

COM-390: Intercultural CommunicationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course examines communication from perspectives grounded in four premises: that culture happens through communication; that by understanding culture and how it shapes communication, we come to understand communication better; that intercultural communication can happen visibly as well as invisibly; and that knowing about communication and about culture can (sometimes) make intercultural communication go more smoothly.

COM-400: Special Topics in CommunicationSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Seminars will investigate a specific topic from a communication perspective, and address the various communication contexts that are the basis of current pedagogy in the field.  These contexts include rhetorical criticism, mass communication, interpersonal communication, and organizational communication.  Examples of specific topics include conflict management, persuasion, and mediated communication.  May be taken on multiple occasions when topics vary.

COM-410: Guided Senior ProjectSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered

In conjunction with a faculty instructor,  the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to seniors who are majoring in Communication. Prerequisite: COM-330and senior standing.

COM-415: PR Cases & CampaignsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

As a capstone experience, students engage in service learning to create a campaign client-based project in a nonprofit setting. Prerequisite: COM-310.

COM-425: Media, Culture & SocietySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A critical look at the role of contemporary mass media in our society.  It examines the relationship of communication media and popular culture. Topics include media mergers, obscenity and indecency issues in television and radio, “reality” TV programming, current advertising and public relations issues, messaging and imaging in the media, and changes in FCC regulations.

COM-450: Relational CommunicationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An advanced course focusing on the theories of interpersonal relationships by exploring the developmental, maintenance, and deterioration stages. Explores both verbal and nonverbal messages, listening, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: COM-260.

COM-475: Interpersonal CapstoneSession(s): Spring | Course Offered

This course will provide students with an in-depth study of the research conducted on relational conflict, forgiveness and reconciliation. Building on broad research skills, this course will offer students advanced skills to conduct research, synthesize results and present research findings. Students will then propose a research project as part of their course final project. Prerequisite: Interpersonal Concentration students only.

COM-480: Communication InternshipSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Supervised experience in business or governmental institutions where work is related to student interest in communication discipline.  Provides students with the opportunity to gain practical, professional experience in conjunction with their academic development. Limited to junior or senior majors in the Communication department with a  2.000 or higher GPA. For 3 hours credit, the student must work 120 hours total over the course of the semester in a single location in an approved site.

COM-495: Senior SeminarSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is the culminating senior experience for majors with the goal of helping students transition to career and graduate school. The course is designed to build critical understanding of the major theoretical traditions in communication and apply these theories to everyday life. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

COM-498: Honors ThesisSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An honors thesis involves a scholarly scientific project selected by the communication major in consultation with her advisor and subject to departmental approval, which will involve conducting a pilot study focusing on her area of specialization. Research, observation, writing and interpreting results will all be conducted by the student. In addition, the student is required to present her thesis orally in an appropriate setting to an audience.

COM-499: Communication Research ProjectSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a communication faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration.  Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing and by permission.

CS-156: Web Site Design & ManagementSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

This course requires extensive use of an HTML editor and a web design package to create web pages and web sites. Students will also learn site planning management. This will include learning to plan web sites and planning and assessing visitor involvement. Specific topics and techniques include: tables, frames, forms, cascading style sheets, use of animation and sound, and image creation and manipulation. Additional topics will include dynamic content, JavaScript, XML, file management, file transfer protocol and web site evaluation.

DAN-110: Beginning Dance TechniqueSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Designed for students who have little or no prior dance training, this course is an introduction to basic dance movements and technique principals common to ballet, jazz, and modern dance. This course teaches foundational skills of alignment, movement articulation, weight transfer, locomotion, and execution of dance sequences. Fulfills Physical Learning requirement of general education. May be repeated up to two credit hours.

DAN-149: Tap ISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A beginning level study of tap dance technique including traditional vocabulary, contemporary vocabulary, development of style, improvisation, fundamentals of music, polyrhythms and choreography. Appropriate for students with no previous tap experience.

DAN-151: Ballet ISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A basic study of ballet including its vocabulary, technique, history and performance.  Appropriate for beginning-level students.

DAN-152: Folk and Square DanceSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to international folk dances, American square dances and contemporary Country-Western dances.  Appropriate for all levels. Also offered as PED-152.

DAN-153: Modern ISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A basic study of modern dance including warm-up, alignment, technique, history and performance.  Appropriate for beginning-level students.

DAN-154: Jazz ISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A basic study of jazz dance including warm-up, isolations, technique and history.  Appropriate for beginning-level students.

DAN-155: African DanceSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A basic study of the movement vocabulary and technique of many of the cultural, social, and ritual dances of Africa. The class will be accompanied with traditional African percussion music. Appropriate for beginning-level students.

DAN-156: World Dance TechniqueSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A basic study of the movement and culture of dance techniques found throughout the world. Techniques studied will include, but not be limited to, Latin, Indian, and Asian dance forms. Each semester course offered will focus on one technique and will be selected by the Dance Program.

DAN-159: Movement ImprovisationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An experiential study of the expressiveness of one’s own movement vocabulary based on the skill of moving spontaneously.

DAN-160: Perspectives in DanceSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course introduces students to various styles of dance technique, professional practices, professional opportunities, dance composition, dance production, and writing about dance. Dance techniques will be explored at a low-intermediate level, therefore experience in one or more styles of modern, ballet, and/or jazz is recommended.

DAN-200: Dance in SocietySession(s): Fall; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Through a broad survey of different genres of dance, students will gain an appreciation of the way this art form reflects social and historical experiences.  The course will include lectures, readings, and opportunities to see dance through video, observations and live performances.

DAN-248: Yoga for DancersSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

This course provides a thorough foundation in the physical, breathing and mindfulness practices of yoga as a means to augment and enrich dance training. Utilizing yoga postures and vinyasa flow, dancers will train their bodies in a balanced way, thus gaining muscular strength and flexibility in areas of the body under-addressed in conventional dance training. This enables fully integrated movement, increases range of motion and helps prevent injury. Through mindfulness practices, the dancer develops mental concentration needed for class, rehearsal and stage performance. Prerequisite: Dance experience required.

DAN-249: Tap IISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A post-beginning level study of tap dance technique including traditional vocabulary, contemporary vocabulary, development of style, improvisation, fundamentals of music, polyrhythms and choreography. Appropriate for students with some training in tap.

DAN-251: Ballet IISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A low-intermediate level study of ballet technique. Appropriate for post-beginning ballet dancers or intermediate/advanced dancers with or without ballet experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-252: Participation in Choreographic ProjectsSession(s): Fall; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This is an opportunity for dance students to gain rehearsal and performance experience by working with choreography students who are enrolled in DAN-356, Dance Composition II.  Students will learn, rehearse, and perform in assigned compositional studies.  Rehearsal time outside of class will be required. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: DAN-159.

DAN-253: Modern IISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A low-intermediate level study of modern dance technique. Appropriate for post-beginning modern dancers or intermediate/advanced dancers with or without modern dance experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-254: Jazz IISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A low-intermediate level study of jazz dance technique. Appropriate for post-beginning jazz dancers or intermediate/advanced dancers with or without jazz dance experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-256: Dance Composition ISession(s): Fall; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An introductory course to the basic elements of solo modern dance choreography, including the use of space, time, energy, abstraction, motif and development, basic form, and the selection of music. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: DAN-159.

DAN-258: Mind/Body IntegrationSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A unique approach to movement and postural re-education through increasing body awareness, breathing techniques, and stress reduction techniques. Students will learn to identify and correct inefficient movement patterns and establish better mechanical balance of their skeletal structure.  No prior movement experience needed.

DAN-259: Improvisation IISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A course designed to involve further exploration of spontaneous movement. In the process of honing improvisation skills, students will refine their understanding of improvisation as a medium for both performance and for self-understanding.  May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: DAN-159.

DAN-260: Movement AnalysisSession(s): Fall; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Every Year

This class integrates the understanding of concepts within Labanalysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals with the development of intermediate-level modern dance technique. Students will discover the fundamental aesthetic and functional elements of human movement, working toward the thorough embodiment and accurate observation of these elements in dance activities. Learning methods will include discussions, readings, experiential-based movement, explorations, observations, and technical practice of modern dance.  Prerequisites: Intermediate-level ability in dance technique as evidenced by completion of a 200-level dance technique course or through consultation with the instructor.

DAN-261: Music for DanceSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A study of the basic principles underlying the relationship between music and dance. Topics covered will include musical notation, musical terminology, basic accompaniment, teacher/accompanist relationships, and relationships between choreography and music. Students enrolling in the course should have rudimentary experience with dance/movement.

DAN-290: Production for DanceSession(s): Every Third Semester | Course Offered Alternate Years

An introduction to the process and practice of lighting design, sound design, costume design, stage management, backstage operations, and front of house procedures for dance productions with particular focus on dance in arts education settings.  Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between production practices and the artistic process.  Prerequisites:  Not recommended for Freshmen.

DAN-297: Methods of Research in DanceSession(s): Spring; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An introductory course that surveys modes of inquiry in current dance scholarship. Specific attention is given to research design, methodological approaches and theoretical frameworks in dance research. Recommended to be taken sophomore year. Prerequisites: DAN-160 and ENG-111.

DAN-299: Dance ResearchSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An introduction to theories, methods and ethics of aesthetic inquiry. Students will formulate an original research project that will culminate in a research paper and/or performance work. This course is open to majors and minors and others with instructor approval.

DAN-349: Tap IIISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An intermediate level study of tap dance technique including traditional vocabulary, contemporary vocabulary, development of style, improvisation, fundamentals of music, polyrhythms and choreography. Appropriate for students with substantive tap experience.

DAN-351: Ballet IIISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced-intermediate level study of ballet technique with focus on the fine tuning of physical and performing skills. Appropriate for advanced dancers with at least some ballet experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-352: Dance RepertorySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is designed to provide opportunities for student dancers to work with faculty choreographers in the creation of a performance piece for a dance concert. Emphasis is placed on developing performance skills and engaging in the choreographic process from inception to completion. Appropriate for intermediate and advanced dancers.

DAN-353: Modern IIISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced-intermediate level study of modern dance technique with focus on the use of dynamics, phrasing, strength and range. Appropriate for advanced dancers with at least some modern dance experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-354: Jazz IIISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced-intermediate level study of jazz dance technique with focus on the fine tuning of physical and performing skills. Appropriate for advanced dancers with at least some jazz dance experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-356: Dance Composition IISession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

The study of modern dance choreography for groups. Using improvisation, assigned movement problems,  and viewings of 20th-century modern dance choreography, students will learn the process of crafting the basic elements of choreography into group form.  Prerequisite: DAN-256.

DAN-358: Movement Studio for SomaticsSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This techniques class integrates the understanding of somatic principles with the development of intermediate-level modern dance technique. Students will discover ease and efficiency in movement, develop movement virtuosity, adopt practices to prevent injury, and expand their ability to express a wide range of movement dynamics. In deepening one’s mastery of modern dance, the application of somatic practice promotes integrating physical, emotional,  anatomical, and aesthetic understanding through conceptual and experiential practice. Learning methods will include discussions, readings, experiential-based movement explorations, hands on guidance, and technical practice of modern dance. Prerequisites: Intermediate-level ability in dance technique as evidenced by completion of a 200-level dance technique course or through consultation with the instructor.

DAN-359: Western Theatrical DanceSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A survey of the development of western theatrical dance from the 19th century to the present, with particular emphasis on 20th century ballet and modern dance in the United States. Through visual and verbal texts, lecture, discussion, and critical response writings, students will become familiar with major artists, their philosophies, and the social contexts in which they worked.

DAN-360: Movement Structure and FunctionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course expands upon the study of aesthetic and functional elements of human movement begun in  DAN-260, Movement Analysis. In DAN-360, Movement Structure and Function we focus on conceptual and experiential understanding of basic anatomical, mechanical, and somatic principles that underlie dance technique. Through readings, discussions, movement explorations, observations, imagery visualizations, and technical practice of modern dance, we will develop knowledge of anatomical function and deepen kinesthetic awareness. Prerequisite: DAN-260.

DAN-449: Tap IVSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced level study of tap dance technique including traditional vocabulary, contemporary vocabulary, development of style, improvisation, fundamentals of music, polyrhythms and choreography. Appropriate for students with extensive training in tap.

DAN-451: Ballet IVSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced level study of ballet technique with focus on the refinement of physical and performing skill. Appropriate for advanced dancers with at least some ballet experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-453: Modern IVSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced level study of modern dance technique with emphasis on the use of dynamics, phrasing, strength and ranges. Appropriate for advanced dancers with at least some modern dance experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-454: Jazz IVSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An advanced level of study of jazz dance technique with emphasis on the rhythmic phrasing, range and performance. Appropriate for advanced dancers with at least some jazz dance experience. Dance majors and minors may repeat for credit.

DAN-456: Meredith Dance TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A performing company which encourages exploration of the creative process through student choreography, as well as the performance of works by faculty and guest choreographers. Auditions are held the first week of classes. Instructor’s consent required.

DAN-457: Pedagogy in Dance TechniqueSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An opportunity for students to gain practical experience in teaching.  Students will work one-on-one with a dance faculty member on topics that may include, but are not limited to, structure of a class, student/teacher interaction, anatomy of concepts and movements, verbal and visual imagery, conveying technical and qualitative ideas, and group versus individual feedback. Prerequisites: DAN-159, DAN-260.

DAN-460: Dance PracticumSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An opportunity for students to gain practical experience in such areas as somatics, arts administration, video for dance, and others. All course specifications must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. Course may be repeated for credit.

DAN-461: Dance Practicum in PerformanceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An opportunity for students to gain practical experience in performance through rehearsing, contributing to the choreographic process, and reflecting on performance roles in a dance to be performed in a formal concert. All course specifications must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. Course may be repeated for credit.

DAN-462: Dance Practicum – ChoreographySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An opportunity for students to gain practical experience in choreography through casting, creating, rehearsing, and producing a dance to be performed in a formal concert.  All course specifications must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. Course may be repeated for credit.

DAN-463: Dance Practicum – Technical TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An opportunity for students to gain practical experience in technical theatre for dance by working on a production team as a stage manager, light board operator, sound board operator, or backstage crew for one or more dance concerts.  All course specifications must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. Course may be repeated for credit.

DAN-464: Dance Practicum – Private Studio TeachingSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This practicum is designed as a field teaching experience in private studio teaching.  Emphasis is placed on students gaining experience in observing, assisting, teaching, and evaluating teaching skills. Students will also research marketing, communication, advertising, and performance production within their practicum experience.  All course specifications must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. Pre-requisite: DAN-761. Pre- or Co-requisite: DAN-457. Pass/Fail grading only.

DAN-480: Internship in Performing Arts AdministrationSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A supervised experience in arts administration with an approved arts organization, government agency, or arts event production team. Areas of focus can include, but are not limited to, office management, event production, organization development and advancement, grant writing, marketing and promotion, audience development, and advocacy, etc. Through this internship students will gain professional experience and will connect their applied experience with the knowledge and skills studied in their discipline. Student will fulfill 40 hours per credit hour as approved by the professor. Pre-requisite: Limited to junior or senior majors in dance or minors in Arts Management with a 2.00 or higher GPA.

DAN-498: Honors Thesis in DanceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to theories, methods and ethics of aesthetic inquiry. Students will formulate an original research project that will culminate in a research paper and/or performance work.  This course is open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the dance faculty.

DAN-499: Dance ResearchSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to theories, methods and ethics of aesthetic inquiry.  Students will formulate an original research project that will culminate in a research paper and/or performance work.  This course is open to senior majors and minors and others with instructor approval.

DAN-580: Internship in Professional PerformanceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides an academic connection to and context for students in a supervised internship with a professional or semi-professional dance company as either company assistant, apprentices, or full company members. Students will work 40 hours per credit hour as part of the company in identified performance areas including but not limited to rehearsal preparation, rehearsal, performance preparation, performance, and post production. Prerequisite: Admission to Certificate in Professional Performance Program in dance.

DAN-590: Advanced Practicum in Dance PerformanceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An advanced experience in dance performance designed for students performing dance repertory by faculty or professional choreographers in on-campus or off-campus venues, or by students in professional venues such as the American College Dance Festival.  Students must work 40 hours per credit hours in rehearsal, rehearsal preparation, performance, and post performance reflection. Prerequisite: Admission to Certificate in Professional Performance Program.

DAN-761: Theory & Approaches to Dance EducationSession(s): Fall; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A focus on the theoretical foundations for dance education. Students come to understand the relationship between theory and practice of dance education through observations, reflection, and discussion.  Attention is given to the relationship between the theories of teaching and the methods used as they relate to stated goals. Prerequisites: DAN-160, DAN-159, DAN-260.  Offered every third semester.

DAN-762: Methods of Teaching Dance, K-12Session(s): Spring; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of dance in public school settings with a focus on teaching methods. Content includes observations, writing lesson plans, exploring and experiencing teaching approaches, and examining methods of evaluation.  Prerequisites: DAN-761. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

DAN-763: Reflective TeachingSession(s): Fall; Every Third Semester | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A course designed to provide the student with directed field experience in teaching dance. Course content includes developing lesson plans, guided teaching experiences, and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on critical reflection about teaching and learning. Prerequisites: DAN-761, DAN-762 and admission to licensure program. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

DAT-430: Selected Topics in Dance and TheaterSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course provides an opportunity for students to focus in depth on a specific topic relevant to theory and/or practice within Dance and Theatre. Topics may include but will not be limited to cultural and societal issues, the body as an artistic instrument, current trends in the field, technology, creative practice, and critical response. Topics are on rotation and may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: THE-114 and/or DAN-160 plus 6 hours completed in Dance or Theatre.

ENG-090: Review of Writing FundamentalsSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A review of the concepts of traditional grammar and punctuation, with ample opportunities to practice proofreading skills, and a refresher course in constructing paragraphs and writing short essays as preparation for freshman composition.  Counts as 3 hours credit toward the semester course load and a full-time student status but does not count as college credit. Pass/Fail.

ENG-111: Principles of WritingSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Instruction and practice in writing well-organized compositions with a review of grammar,  punctuation, and sentence structure.  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of information literacy through required library modules.  Students must pass ENG-111 with a C or  better in order for it to fulfill the prerequisite requirement for other courses in the department.

ENG-200: Critical Reading and WritingSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Continued instruction and practice in reading, writing, and critical thinking with particular emphasis on analysis and interpretation. Further emphasis on information literacy through written assignments and required library modules. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-204: Colonial/Postcolonial LiteratureSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course explores global literature in the context of empire. Readings focus upon literary and cultural dialogues that shape national identity during and after colonization. Colonial and postcolonial texts are read together to show the evolution of culture through narrative. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-211: Survey of British Literature ISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of selected British works from the Old English period through the eighteenth century, this course introduces students to the early classics of English literature and helps place those works in their social and historical contexts. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-212: Survey of British Literature IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

ENG-215: Survey of American Literature ISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of selected major American writers from the colonial period to 1865, including poetry, fiction, essay, history, and autobiography. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-216: Survey of American Literature IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of selected major American writers from 1865 to the present, including poetry, fiction, drama, essay, history, and biography. Prerequisite:  ENG-200.

ENG-220: Creative NonfictionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course combines critical reading, informal reflection, and formal writing on a topic of current intellectual or community interest. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-230: Writing for Campus PublicationsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A course that requires students to serve as staff writers for the campus newspaper and for the literary magazine and to sell ads, work on layouts, and distribute publications across the campus.  Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-231: Introduction to Creative WritingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course is intended to help the beginning writer learn and practice the craft of writing in several different genres.  Critical and expressive skills are sharpened through the practice of writing creative essays, short fiction, and poetry, and also through written and oral critiques of student work and analysis of the techniques of established essayists, fiction writers, and poets. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-235: Writing PoetrySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A course in the writing of poetry.  Contemporary and traditional poetry of various cultures will be examples and guides.  Students will write, experiment, and criticize. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-236: Writing FictionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Narration from the writer’s perspective.  Includes analysis of contemporary fiction and the writing of fiction. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-240: Introduction to FilmSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of film and how to analyze it, including aesthetic, genre, and auteur approaches.  The films will include work from the silent period to the present by both American and European directors. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-242: Romantic ComedySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of drama, fiction, and film, mostly British and American that have helped to create and sustain this popular twentieth-century tradition. The works will include at least three Shakespeare comedies, one or two Restoration or  eighteenth-century comedies, a novel by Jane Austen, plays by Shaw and Wilde, and a  contemporary comic novel; and a film a week, chosen to balance movies from the first and the second halves of the sound era. Prerequisites: ENG-200.

ENG-245: Introduction to JournalismSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An introductory course in news, feature, and editorial writing. Topics to be examined include the role, history, and production of newspapers. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-247: Publishing and EditingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A course in editorial skills for working with a wide range of publications. Stylistic editing, substantive editing, and production editing. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-250: Text and ImageSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course offers an introduction to theory and practice of text/image relationships in specific communication contexts.  Students will study the ways in which texts and images work together to create meaning in various written and electronic documents, and they will design print and electronic documents.  This course aims to prepare professional communications minors to contribute to communication projects and teams in the workplace.

ENG-270: Literary Research/Critical TheorySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the research tools in English studies and a practicum in research methods including finding sources, recognizing different critical approaches, creating an annotated bibliography, and introducing quoted or paraphrased material correctly. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-275: Advanced GrammarSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A systematic and rigorous examination of traditional grammar, including the study of elements of sentence structure and applications to proofreading and language conventions appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context of written and oral communication.  This course explores usage problems and focuses on fundamental issues underlying all errors of grammatical usage. Required for 6-9 communication skills and 9-12 English licensure students. Prerequisite: ENG 111. (Not offered Spring 2016)

ENG-299: Introduction to Research in EnglishSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research project that will culminate in a paper and, if appropriate, a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required to complete registration. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-300: Special Topics in EnglishSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A focused study of a period, genre, movement or theme not covered by the department’s standard course offerings.  May include literature of a geographic or cultural region within or outside the United States, advanced study of a particular author or artistic movement, or investigation of a theme or issue across genres, periods or nationalities. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-310: Creative Writing WorkshopSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course develops skills in many different areas of craft, with the goal of creating effective and original works of writing.  This is a workshop course, meaning the primary text and focus of our evaluative discussion is student writing. Students will write multiple finished pieces, meeting regular deadlines, and will practice offering substantive revisions as well as line edits.  Active participation in workshop discussion is mandatory. This course may be taken more than once. Pre-requisite: ENG 231 or instructor permission.

ENG-320: Young Adult LiteratureSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A course in literature for young adults, with emphasis on classics and trends in realistic fiction or problem novels, historical fiction, science fiction and fantasy, nonfiction, and poetry geared toward young adult audiences. A brief overview of classic chapter books in children’s literature serves as a backdrop.  This course likewise incorporates trends and issues in young adult literacy and pertinent critical stances. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-330: African-American WritersSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A survey of African-American literature from slave narratives to recent works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-335: Contemporary World Literature in TranslationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A study of 20th and 21st-century literature from Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America, including novels, short stories, autobiography, and drama.  Readings provide perspectives of different cultures and a variety of artistic modes. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-340: Development of the British NovelSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of the development of the British novel from its origins to the beginning of the 20th century.  The novels to be studied will represent a variety of forms and styles and will include writers such as Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and others. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-350: Modern DramaSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of modern theatre from 1875 to the present, this course will look at the development of drama through playwrights and their works. Beginning with Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, and Shaw, the class will explore important twentieth century plays and conclude with contemporary drama.  Work will include substantial reading and writing, with viewing and reviewing of performances. Also offered as THE-350. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-351: Old EnglishSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of Old English language and a reading of a history of the English language.  Readings of selected prose and poetry in Old English. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-352: ChaucerSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of Chaucer’s poetry with a few selections from other Middle English writings. Supplementary study of etymology of English words and supplementary reading in background material. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-353: History of the English LanguageSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A course in the historical development of the English language from Proto-Indo-European through the present, including phonology, morphology, semantics and dialect.  We will pay particular attention to the historical and social influences on the language and on those who speak and write it. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-355: ShakespeareSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of selected English history plays and early comedies. Supplementary reading in non-dramatic works of Shakespeare and a few major pieces of criticism. Special attention to live and filmed performances. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-356: ShakespeareSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of selected tragedies, late comedies, and romances. Supplementary reading in non-dramatic works of Shakespeare and a few major pieces of criticism. Special attention to live and filmed performances. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-358: Professional WritingSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A sequence of writing assignments designed to provide experience in writing for different audiences and in different formats, including a  proposal, an academic paper, a review, a how-to piece, and an opinion piece. A brief review of grammar and proofreading. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

ENG-359: Seminar in American Women WritersSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A study of important modern American women writers that focuses on a variety of genres. The seminar format offers opportunity for personal expression and independent research.
Prerequisites: ENG-200, ENG-270.

ENG-360: Seminar in Southern WritersSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A study of fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and autobiographies by Southern American writers. Topics include family. Social institutions, race, religion and the importance of place. The seminar format offers opportunity for personal expression and independent research.
Prerequisites: ENG-200, ENG-270.

ENG-361: Topics in Professional WritingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course draws upon the specialized expertise of the instructor and focuses upon one type of writing used in professional settings.  Topics include public relations, business, research, and promotional writing.  Students will study strategies and contexts for the selected topic and generate original writing projects and presentations.  Prerequisite: ENG-111. This course may be taken more than once under rotating topics.

ENG-362: Contemporary American FictionSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A study of American short fiction and novels from 1970 to the present, including important literary movements such as postmodernism. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-363: Topics in Creative WritingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course draws upon the specialized expertise of the instructor and focuses upon one type of writing prominent in current publishing, such as autofiction, flash writing, screenwriting, young adult literature, or graphic novel. Students will study strategies and contexts for the selected topic and generate original writing projects in the selected form. This course may be taken more than once under rotating topics. Prerequisite: ENG-111

ENG-364: 20th Century Poetry in EnglishSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of 20th-century poetry in the English language, with concentration on some of the major poets and principal schools of poetry, and with briefer study of a wide range of contemporary poets and their works. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-365: English Poetry of the Romantic PeriodSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A study of Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats, with selections from other poets of the Romantic period. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-367: English Literature of the Victorian PeriodSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A study of selected British works from the Victorian period.  This course introduces students to a variety of genres and helps place these works in their litery, historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ENG-200

ENG-368: English Literature of the 18th CenturySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of major works of Swift, Pope, Boswell, and Johnson with additional reading from other authors illustrating the age and significant literary forms. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

ENG-410: Manuscript WorkshopSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

In this seminar course, students begin the assembly of a unified manuscript. This is a workshop course, meaning the primary focus of evaluative reading and revision is student writing. Construction of the manuscript must meet regular deadlines, and active participation through editorial review and group discussion is required. The seminar format offers additional opportunities for personal expression, such as open or staged readings of works in progress, as well as for independent research. This course may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: ENG 231.

ENG-495: Seminar in European LiteratureSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Representative epics, dramas, and novels of continental literature studied in relation to English literature. Prerequisites: ENG-200, ENG-270.

ENG-496: Honors Manuscript ProjectSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Under the direction of a faculty member, a student will complete the assembly of her final writing thesis, making revision choices through directed conference sessions with 496/497 or 410 peers and through one-on-one discussions with a faculty director, focusing on the effectiveness of the manuscript as a whole. Projects for more than one credit hour will be presented orally as well, and Honors manuscripts will also be substantially longer. Prerequisites: ENG 231 and ENG 410.

ENG-497: Advanced Manuscript ProjectSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Under the direction of a faculty member, a student will complete the assembly of her final writing thesis, making revision choices through directed conference sessions with 496/497 or 410 peers and through one-on-one discussions with a faculty director, focusing on the effectiveness of the manuscript as a whole. Projects for more than one credit hour will be presented orally as well, and Honors manuscripts will also be substantially longer. Prerequisites: ENG 231 and ENG 410.

ENG-498: Honors Research ProjectSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Under the direction of a faculty member, a student will conduct an original close reading of a literary work or works informed by a substantial body of critical works on her topic.  Generally, students are advised to limit themselves to one to three works and/or authors.  All projects will culminate in a research paper. Projects will be presented orally as well.

Prerequisites: ENG-200 and ENG-270.

ENG-499: Research ProjectSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Under the direction of a faculty member, a student will conduct an original close reading of a literary work or works informed by a substantial body of critical works on her topic.  Generally, students are advised to limit themselves to one to three works and/or authors. All projects will culminate in a research paper.

Prerequisites: ENG-200, ENG-270.

ENG-764: The Teaching of EnglishSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A pre-professional course aimed at identifying the goals of English teachers and exploring different methods of reaching these goals. The student will begin building a file of teaching materials, including lesson plans, unit plans, and a plan for a year. This course is taken the semester before student teaching and should be taken after most if not all of the ENG requirements for a 9-12 license in English have been successfully completed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: EDU-436.

FRE-206: Introduction to Francophone CulturesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Every Year

A continuation of FRE-205 and exploration of the rich cultures of French-speaking countries, especially those outside of France. FRE-206 aims to enhance the student’s linguistic proficiency through practice of the four skills (speaking, writing, listening and reading). Oral presentations on the Francophone world. Independent language laboratory work required each week. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRE-205 or equivalent.

GEO-203: Geographic Information Systems (GIS)Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides students with the experience of finding and analyzing a variety of geographically referenced data, and then presenting them in graphical and statistical formats in order to answer research questions from everyday life.  This process will include spatial reasoning, problem definition, and appropriate applications for planning and decision-making.

LEG-400: Legal SurveySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An overview of the legal principles and procedures in major areas of the law, including civil procedure, torts, criminal law, contracts, real property, domestic law, wills and estates, and corporations. Open to juniors and seniors only. Permission from the Director of the Paralegal Program is required to enroll.

LEG-401: Legal ResearchSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Legal bibliography and research methods.  Included are court reports, statutes and digests; legal encyclopedias, treatises and periodicals; computer research; legal citation form; Shepard’s citations; introduction to legal writing.  Open to juniors and seniors only. Permission of the Director of the Paralegal Program is required to enroll. Prerequisite: LEG-400.

LEG-402: Law Office ManagementSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Students will gain an understanding of the role of the paralegal in the law office.  Students will gain a thorough knowledge of the N.C. Rules of Professional Conduct and their applicability to attorneys and paralegals.  Students will be able to identify ethical issues a paralegal may encounter and determine the appropriate response.  Students will become familiar with a variety of law office procedures and management techniques.  Topics include the definition, role and responsibilities of the paralegal; confidentiality; conflicts of interest; unauthorized practice of law; professional negligence; developing forms and systems; time keeping and billing; tickler systems; communications skills.  Students are expected to be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook.  Prerequisite/corequisite: LEG-400.

MUA-040: Beginning Class PianoSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered

Introduction to fundamentals of the keyboard. Familiar songs, sight-reading, transposition, chords, ensemble playing.

MUA-044: Preparatory PianoSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Repertoire may range from beginning materials to more advanced repertoire appropriate to the individual student.

MUA-050: Beginning Class VoiceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Class lessons in voice will provide the non-major student an introduction to the fundamental techniques required to develop a stable and healthy singing voice. Students will explore the roots of vocal identity, breathing system, posture, initiating tone, vocal registration, optimizing tone quality, learning and performing a song. No previous vocal/choral experience necessary.

MUA-054: Preparatory VoiceSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Repertoire may range from beginning materials to more advanced repertoire appropriate to the individual student.

MUA-068: Guitar ClassSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Beginning instruction in folk guitar. Basic chords, notations, rhythm. No previous guitar experience necessary; guitars furnished.

MUA-090: String and Percussion TechniquesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of the pedagogies of string and percussion instruments and strategies for teaching them in a classroom setting.

MUA-091: Brass and Woodwind TechniquesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of the pedagogies of brass and woodwind instruments and strategies for teaching them in a classroom setting.

MUA -205: Composition IISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Composition in various forms for voice, chorus, individual instruments and combinations of instruments. Instruction in private lessons or in groups.

MUA-244: PianoSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

J.S. Bach – A prelude and fugue from WTC, or two contrasting dance movements from a suite; a complete sonata by a Classical composer; a character piece from the Romantic period; a composition such as an etude or toccata from the 20th century; a piece composed since 1950.

MUA-245: OrganSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Bach preludes and fugues of the first master period, chorale preludes, trio sonatas; works of Mendelssohn, Franck, and other romantics; selected 20th century and pre-Bach repertoire; service-playing, improvisation.

MUA-246: HarpsichordSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

MUA-254: VoiceSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Technical work of the freshman year continued; scales and staccato exercises.  Moderately difficult songs by composers of romantic and contemporary literature. French and German pronunciation.

MUA-264: ViolinSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Scales and arpeggios in three octaves; Mazas Etudes Speciales, Kreutzer etudes; sonatas of Corelli and Handel; concertos by Rode, Viotti, and Kreutzer.

MUA-265: ViolaSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

MUA-266: CelloSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

MUA-267: Double BassSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

MUA-268: GuitarSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Continued work with technique; Segovia, diatonic scales; compositions by Sor, Milan, Tarrega, DeVisee.

MUA-274: FluteSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

MUA-275: ClarinetSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

MUA-276: OboeSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

MUA-277: SaxophoneSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

MUA-278: BassoonSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

MUA-284: TrumpetSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

MUA-285: French HornSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

MUA-289: PercussionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

MUA-290: Sophomore RecitalSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A solo recital (which may be shared by two or three performers). Prerequisites: 4 student recital appearances, approved by the faculty in the student’s applied music area, and a hearing at least two weeks prior to the recital. Recital fee assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-405: CompositionSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-444: PianoSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-445: OrganSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-446: HarpsichordSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-454: VoiceSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-464: ViolinSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-465: ViolaSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-466: CelloSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-467: Double BassSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-468: GuitarSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-474: FluteSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-475: ClarinetSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-476: OboeSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-477: SaxophoneSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-478: BassoonSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-489: PercussionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-490: Graduation Recital (Performance majors)Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A 50- to 60-minute recital including music at senior level to be offered during the fall or spring of the final year of study. The student’s research will be distributed at the recital. The recital fulfills the Graduation Recital requirement for the Bachelor of Music degree with a major in performance.  Performance majors only. Recital fee assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUA-491: Graduation Recital (B.A. or Music Education Majors)Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A 20- to 60-minute recital, including music at the appropriate level of advancement, to be offered during the fall or spring of the final year of study.  The student’s research will lead to two documents associated with the recital: 1) program notes 2) a theoretical and historical analysis of the works and a discussion of how the learner has generated new insights or interpretations that foster reflection and self-understanding. The recital fulfills the Graduation Recital requirement for the Bachelor of Music degree with a major in music education or for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music.  B.A. or music education majors only. For the Bachelor of Arts candidate, a culminating project which combines research and performance may be substituted for a solo or shared recital. This substitution may be made upon recommendation of the faculty. Recital fee assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of MUS 295 – Sophomore Assessment Conference

MUE-134: Meredith ChorusSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to all students without audition. Gives approximately two performances per semester on and off of the campus. Students learn to advance their choral performance skills. A wide variety of music is programmed.

MUE-136: Accompanying ClassSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

All students whose principal applied study is piano or organ are expected to fulfill at least two semesters of their ensemble requirement in accompanying. Two credit hours of accompanying class are required for credit in accompanying, or for accompanying a recital. Students are urged to take this class as early in their studies as possible.

MUE-139: Handbell ChoirSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Handbell ringers perform on and off campus. Students must be able to read music. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-231: Wind EnsembleSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

Rehearsal and performance of works taken from standard ensemble literature; open to all qualified students by arrangement with the instructor. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-232: Flute EnsembleSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Rehearsal and performance of works taken from standard ensemble literature; open to all qualified students by arrangement with the instructor. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-233: Chamber Music EnsembleSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Rehearsal and performance of chamber music, selected to match the abilities of the students enrolled. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-236: AccompanyingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

All students whose principal applied study is piano or organ are expected to fulfill at least two semesters of their ensemble requirement in accompanying. In addition, these students are expected to accompany [with or without credit] every semester, except for the two semesters that, they are in a choral ensemble. Normally, one of the following is expected for one hour of credit: a) prepare to accompany a recital for one major; b) accompany lessons, jury examinations, and student recital appearances for one major; c) accompany lessons and juries for two non-majors [the equivalent of one 60-minute or two 30-minute lessons]; or d) accompany an ensemble.  Any work beyond this must be approved by the accompanist’s principal applied instructor. Non-music majors may earn credit by accompanying lessons and juries for one 60-minute or two 30-minute lessons. Prerequisite: MUE-136.

MUE-237: String EnsembleSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Rehearsal and performance of works taken from standard ensemble literature; open to all qualified students by arrangement with the instructor. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-238: Meredith SinfoniettaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Rehearsal and performance of orchestral works, selected to match the abilities of the students enrolled. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-332: Flute QuartetSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Rehearsal and performance of works taken from standard ensemble literature; open to all qualified students by arrangement with the instructor. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-334: Meredith ChoraleSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A select group of approximately 35-45 singers who represent the College in several concerts per semester both on campus and off. A music tour is planned each spring and other off campus experiences as opportunity arises. By audition only. Instructor’s consent required. This course fulfills the General Educational experiential learning requirement.

MUE-335: Encore!Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

MUE-336: Piano EnsembleSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Study of works for piano, four hands or two pianos. Instructor’s consent required.

MUE-338: Raleigh Symphony OrchestraSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A community orchestra which rehearses and performs primarily at Meredith. Conductor’s and instructor’s consent required.

MUS-010: Recital Seminar/Repertoire ClassSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Recital and repertoire class attendance and written reflection; designed to give music students performance opportunities and experiences as well as to develop critical listening skills.

MUS-100: Elementary Theory & CompositionSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Introduction to the theory of music and its creation; fundamental aspects of melody and harmony explored in detail. Emphasis on rhythm and meter, notation, tonality, triads, composition and analysis, modulation, two-, three-, and four-voice writing, and functional harmony through dominant seventh chords. Three class hours weekly; at least one hour per week in the computer laboratory.

MUS-101: Elementary Theory & CompositionSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Introduction to the theory of music and its creation; fundamental aspects of melody and harmony explored in detail. Emphasis on rhythm and meter, notation, tonality, triads, composition and analysis, modulation, two-, three-, and four-voice writing, and functional harmony through dominant seventh chords. Three class hours weekly; at least one hour per week in the computer laboratory. Prerequisite: MUS-100.

MUS-140: Elementary Keyboard Harmony ISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Exploration of the keyboard aimed at fluency in basic chordal progressions in all keys and modes. Simple transposition of melodies stressing interval relationships and using basic accompanying patterns. Sight-reading. Methods of keyboard improvisation are introduced. Regular and accelerated sections are offered. Prerequisites: The ability to read music and some basic piano study.

MUS-141: Elementary Keyboard Harmony IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered

Exploration of the keyboard aimed at fluency in basic chordal progressions in all keys and modes. Simple transposition of melodies stressing interval relationships and using basic accompanying patterns. Sight-reading. Methods of keyboard improvisation are introduced. Regular and accelerated sections are offered. Prerequisite: MUS-140.

MUS-150: Elementary Ear-TrainingSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Introduction to sight-singing and ear-training through the basic elements of intervallic relationships, rhythm, and chord structure. Emphasis on converting notation to musical sound and musical sound back to notation. Basic conducting patterns must be mastered in conjunction with sight-singing. Use of programmed computer instruction in a lab setting to drill these skills. Students must be able to read music and to match pitch.

MUS-151: Elementary Ear-TrainingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Introduction to sight-singing and ear-training through the basic elements of intervallic relationships, rhythm, and chord structure. Emphasis on converting notation to musical sound and musical sound back to notation. Basic conducting patterns must be mastered in conjunction with sight-singing. Use of programmed computer instruction in a lab setting to drill these skills. Students must be able to read music and to match pitch. Prerequisite: MUS-150.

MUS-202: Advanced Theory & CompositionSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Review and continuation, through analysis and composition, of functional harmony. Seventh, ninth, and eleventh chords. Study of form, analysis, counterpoint, 20th century techniques. Harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MUS-101.

MUS-203: Advanced Theory & CompositionSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Review and continuation, through analysis and composition, of functional harmony. Seventh, ninth, and eleventh chords. Study of form, analysis, counterpoint, 20th century techniques. Harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MUS-202.

MUS-214: Music AppreciationSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A course designed to impart an understanding of music as an element of liberal culture and to develop the power of listening intelligently. Masterworks in music literature will be learned. No technical knowledge is required.

MUS-215: Music LiteratureSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction of music from a global perspective, to music resources such as reference materials, to aural analysis of music and score analysis. Students learn to listen actively to music from folk, popular and art traditions, both Western and non-Western. The process of writing about music will be explored as well as career opportunities in music. This course is a foundation for more advanced studies in music history and literature and is designed for music majors and students with some formal music background. Required of freshman majors; prerequisite to music history and literature.

MUS-242: Intermediate Keyboard Harmony ISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Reinforcement at the keyboard of harmonic vocabulary associated with MUS-202 and MUS-203. Emphasis on four-part texture, with controlled voice leading, through realization of abstract harmonic settings, figured bass and melody accompaniment. Development of basic functional skills, such as harmonization of melody, score reading, sight-reading, transposition, and improvisation. Prerequisite: MUS-141.

MUS-243: Intermediate Keyboard Harmony IISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Reinforcement at the keyboard of harmonic vocabulary associated with MUS-202 and MUS-203. Emphasis on four-part texture, with controlled voice leading, through realization of abstract harmonic settings, figured bass and melody accompaniment. Development of basic functional skills, such as harmonization of melody, score reading, sight-reading, transposition, and improvisation. Prerequisite: MUS-242.

MUS-252: Intermediate Ear-TrainingSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Continued development of ear-training, sight-singing, and conducting skills begun in MUS-150 and MUS-151. Prerequisite: MUS-151.

MUS-253: Intermediate Ear-TrainingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Continued development of ear-training, sight-singing, and conducting skills begun in MUS-150 and MUS-151. Prerequisite: MUS-252.

MUS-254: Language and Diction ISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The primary objective of this course is to offer the student the tools necessary to identify, pronounce, and sing in Italian, Spanish, and English, using the International Phonetic Alphabet.  Skills will be enhanced through written and spoken exercises, and through the memorization and performance of sung repertoire.

MUS-295: Sophomore Assessment ConferenceSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Normally scheduled in the fourth semester of full-time study, the conference includes a jury performance and a conference with a faculty committee. Upon successful completion of the Sophomore Assessment Conference, the student will be authorized to register for upper-level applied studies, and for junior and graduation recitals. Pass/Fail only.

MUS-299: Introduction to Research in MusicSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to freshmen and sophomores who have an interest in music and who would like to work individually with a faculty member on a project involving research, performance, or other creative endeavor in music. In conjunction with a faculty member, the student will formulate and execute a project at an intermediate level of complexity. The project will require a culminating experience involving a written report and/or a public presentation of its purpose, process, and outcomes. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. MUS-100.

MUS-300: ConductingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Students will learn basic conducting patterns, techniques, and beginning rehearsal procedures for instrumental and choral ensembles. Prerequisites: MUS-101.

MUS-301: Conducting WorkshopSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Advanced conducting techniques, score study, and rehearsal pedagogy culminate in laboratory setting with live musicians of diverse musical backgrounds and skill sets.

MUS-305: Arranging for Instruments and VoicesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A study of the characteristics of instrumentation and ranges of the voice, wind, brass, percussion, keyboard, and string instruments. This course utilizes technology in orchestration and voice-leading techniques. Prerequisites: MUS-203, MUS-151, MUS-253.

MUS-315: History of Musical Styles and Structure: Antiquity -1750Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A historical and stylistic study of music from ancient Greece through the Baroque period including analysis, composition in specific styles, performance and listening. Prerequisites: MUS-101, MUS-214.

MUS-316: History of Musical Styles and Structure: 1750 to the PresentSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A historical and stylistic study of music from the early Classical period into the 21st century. Includes analysis, composition in specific styles, performance and listening.  Prerequisites: MUS-101, MUS-214.

MUS-317: Form and AnalysisSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is designed to give a student thorough experience in observing harmonic, melodic and formal structure of music of the Common Practice Period with attention given to their use in Modern music and exceptions to these formal practices in that era. Special emphasis will be placed upon studying both the harmonic language of this period and the typical formal designs known as: sonata, theme and variation, rondo, A B A, and sonata-rondo.  The course will cover these techniques in the works of representative composers.  Additionally, the course will examine the multi-movement designs of sonatas, symphonies and chamber music.  Prerequisite: MUS 203.

MUS-333: Seminar in Music technologySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to music technology software and hardware, acoustics, digital audio, keyboard-based sequencing, and notation software.  Lab activities will place an emphasis on the operation and components of the typical MIDI and digital audio.  Students will gain a working knowledge of electronic sound systems, instrument and vocal amplification systems, recording and streaming systems, and individual and classroom music education instructional tools.  Students will complete independent projects in areas such as digital audio. music notation, sequencing, and incorporating music education technology pedagogy tools in a classroom setting.  Prerequisties: MUS 202 and MUS 203.

MUS-354: Language Diction IISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

In this course students will apply the International Alphabet to German, French, and other languages in poetry and song.  Skills will be enhanced through written and spoken exercises, and through the memorization and performance of sung repertoire.

MUS-400: Special Topics in MusicSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the literature, materials and pedagogy of her applied area. It will rotate through voice, keyboard and instrumental areas. Structure of the course will vary according to the applied area. Prerequisite: MUS-101.

MUS-450: Practicum in PedagogySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Other Year

Development of skills necessary for teaching in the applied studio through instruction of applied students, providing hands-on teaching experience under the close supervision of the instruction.  May be repeated for credit.  Prerequisite or Corequisite: MUS 493

MUS-455: Opera WorkshopSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A course focusing on preparation and performance of opera scenes or of a complete opera. This course offers singers in various stages of vocal development an opportunity to learn basic stagecraft. Emphasis on character development, ensemble acting, role preparation. Scenes and roles will be assigned, musically prepared, staged and presented in a performance at the end of each semester. Functions in collaboration with Capitol Opera Raleigh.  May be repeated for credit.

MUS-480: Professional Practices in MusicSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course will explore effective business models and practices of the private studio, community music organization, public performance, and various academic environments, according to each student’s area of interest.  Students will hone skills for positions appropriate to their concentration, including but not limited to writing a cover letter, resume, and/or curriculum vitae; creating a portfolio specific to their area of expertise and desired career path; negotiating contracts and pay rates for private lessons and public performances; and establishing an online social media presence.  Students will meet with representatives of numerous music businesses and will have the opportunity to visit music businesses to observe successful administrative and entrepreneurial elements.  Prerequisite: MUS 295.

MUS-493: Seminar in PedagogySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to individualized applied studio instruction.  Directed reading and discussion concerning technique and physiology, learning theory, and lesson planning.  Discussion of issues related to setting up a private applied studio.  Includes supervised teaching of private lessons and observation of experienced teachers.  Taught in rotation between sections for piano, vocal, and instrumental pedagogy.  Prerequisite:  MUS 101.

MUS-494: Seminar in Music LiteratureSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Other Year

Research in topics related to music literature, history, or performance selected by the instructor, individual students, or the class. Different topics each semester.

MUS-498: Honors Thesis in MusicSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Joint participation by students and faculty in the discovery, examination, and analysis of knowledge in music. The project must meet honors program thesis requirements as well as expectations of the music faculty. Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only.

MUS-499: Research in MusicSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to junior and senior music majors or others with permission. In conjunction with a music faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project at an advanced level of complexity culminating in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisites: MUS-203 and 4 credits from courses MUS-315, MUS-316.

MUS-580: Internship in MusicSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An internship in professional music designed to give students practical knowledge and experience preparing them for careers in the national not-for-profit and commercial music arena. For three hours credit students must work 120 hours in one approved professional music organization or with a private studio teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to Certificate in Professional Performance Program in music.

MUS-720: Materials and Methods in Elementary SchoolsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

Designed for music education majors, this course is based on the development of concepts through a series of sequential music activities. Attention is given to formulating a philosophy of music education, Orff, Kodaly, and Dalcroze techniques and lesson planning. Public school observation and teaching are included. Prerequisites: MUS 203, 253, 300. Pre or Corequisite: EDU-232.

MUS-730: Secondary Choral Methods and MaterialsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course is designed to provide prospective music educators with appropriate instructional techniques for middle and high school choral and general music programs. Through lecture, discussion, observations and practical application, students will learn about and incorporate skills, philosophies and techniques into their practices. Off-campus observations and teaching experiences are required. Prerequisites: MUS 270, Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU 232, MUS 203, MUS 253. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of instructor.

MUS-731: Secondary Instrumental Methods and MaterialsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Provides music education majors with pragmatic approaches and pedagogical skills necessary to teach band and strings in secondary schools. Topics include philosophy, objectives, evaluation, motivation, administration, lesson plans, sequential instruction, marching band, professional development, jazz band, alternative string ensembles, score study, teaching with modeling/singing, hiring staff, traveling and rehearsing. In addition to regular, on-campus sessions, the class spends time observing and teaching instrumental classes at public schools. Instructors arrange these off-campus sessions, but students are responsible for their own transportation. Prerequisites: MUS 203, MUS 253, MUS 720. Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU 232 Open to students admitted to teacher education program or with permission of instructor.

POL-100: American Political SystemsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to American government and politics with an emphasis on the basic constitutional structure of the government and on the political institutions that surround it. Attention given to current political events and issues.

POL-200: Law and SocietySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the nature and function of law, to the structure and operation of the court systems of the United States and to the legal professions.  Also considers current legal controversies.

POL-203: American Public PolicySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of public policies and their ethical implications.. Models and methods used by policy analysts will be studied.

POL-204: Comparative PoliticsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to the theory and practice of government in major contrasting political systems. Liberal democratic, authoritarian and developing systems are considered.

POL-205: Political Ideas SeminarSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Selected readings from original sources in the area of modern and contemporary political philosophy. Topics covered include various ideologies, ideal government, liberty, equality, individualism, and the role of women in the public sphere. Emphasis is on writing and speaking skills. Prerequisite: ENG-111.

POL-207: Campaigns and ElectionsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course is an in-depth examination of campaigns and elections. Students will learn how successful campaigns are run, how elections are conducted, as well as assisting with the composition and conducting of the Meredith Poll. Topics of the poll will vary.

POL-210: International PoliticsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to world politics. A survey of current issues and trends in major regions and the principles of interactions among nations, blocks, international organizations, and multinational corporations.

POL-235: Applied Quantitative ResearchSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

In this course, students will learn to use quantitative data through participation in an applied research project. Students will identify appropriate quantitative data to answer a research question and then use technological tools to organize, analyze and present that data. By the conclusion of the course students will generate a tangible product showcasing their participation in this project. Also offered as COM 235, HIS 235 and SOC 235.

POL-282: The Modern Middle EastSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course will address cultural, social and political issues in the Middle East since the late 19th and into the 21st century. Topics covered will include imperialism, nationalism, the creation of modern states, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian Revolution, the politics of oil, U.S. – Middle East relations, and the emergence of activist Islamic groups. Also offered as HIS-282.

POL-301: Civil LibertiesSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

The law and practice of constitutional interpretation with a focus on civil liberties and the bill of rights.  The case method and intensive discussion are used to introduce the process of legal reasoning and disciplined analytic thinking.

POL-302: Civil Rights LawSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course is an examination of the development of United States civil rights law in the areas of gender and race.  Students will read Supreme Court opinions and analyze how these decisions might be applied to modern racial and gender issues. The case method and intensive discussion are used to introduce the process of legal reasoning and disciplined analytic thinking.

POL-305: Public AdministrationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to the field of public administration. The executive branch of American government will be examined. Methods, theories, and skills of administration in the public sector will be studied.

POL-306: Nonprofit AdministrationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course will introduce students to the role that non‐profit organizations play in American life and how they intersect with government. Students will also learn about topics affecting how non‐profits are managed, including: leadership, budgeting, fundraising, and advocacy. This course offers a theoretical and practical overview of the sector.

POL-310: Women and PoliticsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course will examine the role women play in politics and the participation of women in government as voters, elected and appointed officials, and party leaders. Topics of discussion will include women in political theory, the history of women in American politics, and current gender issues.

POL-320: International Political EconomySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course examines the politics of international economic relations between countries and in the world as a whole. The course orients students with the basic underpinnings of international economic policymaking and the basic theoretical paradigms of the field of international political economy. Specific topics of discussion include the politics of international trade, the effect of globalization on the U.S. economy and political system, the role of multinational corporations and nongovernmental organizations in global politics, relations between the developed and developing worlds, and the rise of regional economic blocs.

POL-322: Public Opinion and American PoliticsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course explores the structure and dynamics of American Public opinion, providing a broad-based introduction to the forces that shape citizens’ social and political attitudes in the contemporary United States.  The content of the course will focus on three major areas: definitions of public opinion and theories of opinion formation, how public opinion is influenced and how it in turn influences governmental policy, and public opinion in specific areas of the contemporary American political scene.

POL-330: Modern US Foreign PolicySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

A study of global issues involving the United States vis-a-vis Europe, the former Soviet Union, Latin America, Africa, Middle East, and Asia. May be taken for credit in political science or history. Also offered as HIS-330.

POL-331: Environmental Politics & PolicySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course will examine the politics and policy of environmental issues both in the United States and globally. We will study the forces and constraints that shape policy at local, state and national levels of government. We will also examine the issues and problems of the global environment and international policy being developed to address those issues. Students will examine and assess proposed solutions to the problems.

POL-334: Research Design and MethodsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides a broad overview of the nature of inquiry in political science and is intended to give students an understanding of how to do empirical research. Students will finish the course knowing how philosophy of science, research design, and statistical and causal inference are understood in the discipline of political science. To be taken during semester before POL-498/9.

POL-340: State & Local Political SystemsSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

This course provides a survey of politics and policy at the state and local levels of government. Institutions, processes, and behaviors of governments and political participants will be studied. The federal system will be examined from the viewpoint of states and localities.

POL-351: Political LeadershipSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

What does it take to be an effective political leader? How can you become a political leader—at the local, state, or even national level? This course examines theories of effective political leadership. It also helps students develop the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary for contemporary political leaders.

POL-367: Lobbying and AdvocacySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

The course will cover the history and current practices of legislative lobbying and public issue advocacy. The students will learn to prepare legislation and lobby for its passage, as well as how to move public opinion through advocacy. Students will learn how to build effective political coalitions and conduct policy campaigns.

POL-370: World Politics SimulationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course will introduce students to the origins, function, structure and issues facing the contemporary International Organizations such as the United Nations and prepare a student delegation to participate in a simulation such as a Model United Nations conference, a Model Arab League conference, or an online world politics simulation among other venues. Participation in the conference or simulation is a requirement for the course. Students will earn 3 credits the first time they complete the course. The course may be repeated for 1–2 hours of credit.

POL-380: Political Science InternshipSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course exposes students to the workplace environments in which political scientists and practical politicians function; puts “flesh on the bones” of the theory of political science that students learn in the classroom; demonstrates how the ideals of political science sometimes inform and sometimes are transformed by actual practices in the field.  May be repeated for credit.

POL-401: Moot CourtSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course will prepare students to participate in moot court competitions, which simulate the experience of arguing a constitutional law case before the Supreme Court. Students will gain hands-on experience in legal research, critical thinking, and effective argument. Prerequisites: POL-301 or POL-302 recommended.

POL-450: Politics PracticumSession(s): Summer | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course will involve traveling to either Washington, DC or political conventions in order to see and experience politics in action, with a particular focus on the importance of democratic engagement.  Convention trips will focus on themes of the current election, while Washington, DC trips will involve a current topic in political discourse.  Topics will be chosen in accordance with faculty and student interest and may include current events, current trends in research, and/or professional practice.  May be repeated for credit but no more than three hours may be applied to POL elective credit.  Prerequisite: POL 100.

POL-480: Advanced FieldworkSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course is a capstone experience for the Political Science majors and is an opportunity for them to use their political science training to understand the interplay between theory and methods and the actual world of political organization and movements. Students will complete a placement with a community or government agency involved in a political campaign or other activity, as approved by the instructor. All students will utilize political science theories, literature, methods and data to explore the phenomena they encounter in their fieldwork. Findings of the semester long project will be presented to political science faculty, students, and the broader Meredith Community.
Prerequisite: POL-380 or permission of instructor.

POL-498: Honors Thesis in Political StudiesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

A research and seminar course required of Honors Scholars and Teaching Fellows in which each student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and an oral presentation. The director of the research project must approve a preliminary research proposal during the semester before the student takes this course, as must the appropriate director(s) of Honors and/or Teaching Fellows. The project must meet Honors and Teaching Fellows requirements as well as those of the History and Political Science Department. This course substitutes for the POL-499 requirement. Prerequisites: Students must complete one WI course and POL-334 or LEG-401, or permission of instructor. A student who completes the POL-498 Research Seminar as a prerequisite may undertake a second elective POL-498 or POL-499 research project on her own with an individual faculty director without attending the seminar a second time.

POL-499: Senior ResearchSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course is a capstone experience for Political Science majors in which each student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper. The director of the research project must approve a preliminary research proposal during the semester before the student takes this course. Prerequisites: Students must complete one WI course and POL-344 or LEG-401, or permission of instructor. A student who completes the POL-499 Research Seminar as a prerequisite may undertake a second elective POL-499 research project on her own with an individual faculty director without attending the seminar a second time.

PSY-320: Abnormal PsychologySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of the major forms of behavioral pathology and current therapies. Topics covered include anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, affective disorders, schizophrenic disorders, and chronic brain syndromes.  Prerequisite: PSY-100.

RES-102: World ReligionsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An exploration of major eastern and western religious traditions including, but not limited to, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In addition to looking at the historical development of such traditions, this course addresses issues concerning current religious practice and the role of major religious traditions in contemporary society.

RES-103: Biblical Literature and HistorySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of the canonical literature of the Jewish and Christian traditions. This course will explore how this diverse body of literature relates to its social and historical contexts. The focus will be on acquiring tools from a variety of academic approaches to reading the Bible. This course will enable students to understand how interpretive choices have been made in the reading of biblical texts and to reflect on how diverse ways of interpreting the Bible have shaped culture and continue to do so.

RES-104: Religious Ethics and Social IssuesSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This is an introductory course in ethical reflection which explores contemporary social issues from a variety of religious and philosophical traditions. Issues covered pertain to personal concerns such as sexuality, marriage, and reproduction, as well as broader societal issues regarding our economic lives and the environment.

RES-200: Introductory Topics in Religious and Ethical StudiesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

An introductory study of selected topics within the area of religious studies as determined by faculty expertise and student interest. Topics may take a thematic, historical or comparative approach within the following areas: religion and culture, religion and society, religious ethics, religious thought and sacred texts. The course may be repeated for credit.

RES-201: Philosophy and the Meaning of LifeSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

An examination of issues common to human experience, such as the nature of reality and the self; theories of knowledge and values; and concepts of fate, free will and justice.

RES-220: Ethics of Love and JusticeSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course is an introduction to the historical development of ethical thought in the western philosophical and religious traditions. It is organized around the central themes of love and justice as addressed by major thinkers from the ancient past to the present. Students will explore various interpretations of the nature and demands of justice in conversation with the different roles that love and emotion are seen to play in shaping ethical commitments and practices.

RES-221: Comparative Religious EthicsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

The course focuses on methodological issues associated with comparison in the academic study of religion and theological approaches.  The role of comparison in interfaith dialogue will be emphasized throughout the course.  Examples from a variety of religious traditions about relevant social issues will be used to reiterate methodological concerns and to expand student knowledge of the variety of approaches to moral and ethical decision making in different religious traditions.

RES-250: Religion and Moving ImagesSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course explores religious meaning in moving images (film or television).  It will consider a wide variety of sources – from independent to mainstream Hollywood blockbusters, to television shows and mini-series – and will provide students with background knowledge of a variety of ways religious meaning is constructed and explored in films and television.  After introductory readings on film theory, students will critically assess the form and content of films and/or television shows selected from different eras, cultures, or religious perspectives to explore how the moving image can give rise to religious meaning.

RES-253: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: A ConversationSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

Judaism, Christianity and Islam trace their roots to one biblical ancestor: Abraham. This course delves into a comparative study of the beliefs, practices, and social concerns of the Abrahamic religions and examines constructive methods of interfaith dialogue.

RES-254: Introduction to Asian ReligionsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course introduces the major religions of India, China, and Japan, including (but not limited to) Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Students will develop a cross-cultural understanding of religion by engaging in a comparative study of beliefs, practices, and sacred texts of these Asian traditions.

RES-267: Christian Origins: From Cult to EmpireSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

A study of the development and diversity of early Christian life and thought as reflected in literature spanning from the New Testament letters of Paul to the writings of St. Augustine in the fifth century. Topics will include the spread of Christianity and the formation of the early church; persecution and martyrdom; heresy and orthodoxy; women’s roles; social issues; asceticism and sainthood.

RES-268: Women and the BibleSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

A study of the status of women in the Old and New Testament cultures, the understandings of women in biblical theology, and the role of women in the events of biblical history.

RES-280: Religious and Ethical Studies InternshipSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course consists of an internship in fields related to religious or ethical studies or both. The student will evaluate the experience under the guidance of an RES faculty member. An internship proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Pass/Fail only.

RES-283: Women, Religion & EthnographySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course explores women’s attitudes, beliefs, and practices within their religious heritages through written descriptive studies based almost entirely on Fieldwork research.  Ritual, leadership roles and religious experiences of women across a wide range of cultures will be examined.

RES-284: Sin, Satan, and EvilSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of beliefs, images, and stories about sin and evil in the religious traditions of Judaism and Christianity, focusing around the figure of Satan and patterns of belief and disbelief in Western religious history.

RES-285: Religion and LiteratureSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course investigates the presence of religious concepts and themes in a variety of literary forms, as well as the presence of literary themes and devices in religious works. Course readings will draw from different time periods and cultures and include myth, history, parable, short stories, essays, oral narratives, poems, and novels. This course meets the general education literature requirement.

RES-299: Introduction to Research in Religious and Ethical StudiesSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research project that will culminate in a paper and, if appropriate, a presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration.

RES-306: Religion and Pop CultureSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course explores the intersection of religion and pop culture, focusing on religion in pop culture and pop culture as religion.  The relationship between religion and culture is explored through a variety of theoretical lenses with examples being drawn from American pop culture (TV, music, internet, and film).  Students will be challenged to read popular culture “texts” through a critical lens that takes into account issues such as ideology, Americanization, and racial, gendered, and sexual identities.

RES-344: Bioethics and SocietySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course explores the ethical implications of topics related to wellness and health from the perspective of practitioners, patients, and researchers. Topics typically include gender, sexuality and reproduction; end of life issues and care; mental health; and research ethics.

RES-345: Environmental EthicsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to environmental ethics and their practical application to current environmental concerns, such as population, consumption and waste, climate change, food ethics, sustainability, and responsibility to future generations. Particular attention will be given to the ethical challenges of weighing competing interests and claims.

RES-346: Anthropology of ReligionSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course focuses on the ways in which religion and human culture intersect. We will look at such themes as myth, symbol, magic and ritual and see how they contribute to the formation of human societies. Students will engage in a local field research project to learn how anthropologists study religion. Also offered as SOC-346.

RES-351: Jesus and the GospelsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course examines the varied and multiple ways that Jesus is portrayed in the New Testament gospels and other Christian gospels. The modern quest for the historical Jesus is a focal point of this course, and students will examine a variety of historical, literary and theological problems posed by the gospel texts and the quest. This course meets the general education literature requirement.

RES-352: History of Christian Thought and EthicsSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course examines both historical development and contemporary themes in Christian thought and ethics. How have Christian beliefs about God, humanity, love, and justice influenced moral teaching on significant social issues including economic interests, race, gender and ecology? What are the ethics of individual human action, and what is the role of the church?

RES-379: Religion and Globalization in the AmericasSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Alternate Years

This course will investigate the interconnections among religion, economics and politics in the Americas during four significant historical moments: conquest, slavery, independence/ industrialization, and the crises of the mid 20th century.

RES-385: Europe in the Middle AgesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course will survey major developments in western Europe from roughly 400 CE to 1300 CE.  It will use primary and secondary sources to explore the growth of a distinctly European civilization upon its Judaeo-Christian, classical and Germanic roots, and will trace the expression of this civilization through its political, religious and educational institutions; its former religious thought and vernacular literature; its art, architecture and music; and its interactions with different cultures both within and beyond its borders. Specific topics covered will include the Germanic invasions, monasticism, the conversion of Europe, the growth of the manorial and feudal systems, scholastic thought in the universities, heresy and the crusades, the growth of representative government and others. Also offered as HIS-385.

RES-387: Age of Renaissance/ReformationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course will work primarily through class discussion of primary sources to understand the changes in outlook expressed in the Renaissance, the Reformation and the Scientific Revolution between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries. In particular, it will focus upon the transition from medieval toward modern attitudes in areas such as historical and scientific thought, political and educational theory, philosophy, art, music and religious thought and practice. It will also address the economic, social and political variables that underlay these changes in intellectual life, as well as the impact that these ideas had upon European society. Students will be encouraged to explore individual interests from their own major fields and personal backgrounds. Also offered as HIS-387.

RES-400: Selected Topics in Religious and Ethical StudiesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

A study of selected topics within the area of religious studies as determined by faculty expertise and student interest.  Topics may take a thematic, historical or comparative approach within the following areas: religion and culture, religion and society, religious ethics, religious thought and sacred texts. The course may be repeated for credit.

RES-480: Senior InternshipSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This capstone course consists of an internship in fields related to religious or ethical studies or both. Under the guidance of an RES faculty member, the student will apply theories and methods from these disciplines to actual work in the field, evaluate her experience, and give a formal presentation. An internship proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration.Open to Junior and Senior RES majors. Pass/Fail only.

RES-498: Honors Thesis in ReligionSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and conduct a research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements and conform to the thesis guidelines of the Department of Religious and Ethical Studies. Open to Honors students and Teaching Fellows during their junior or senior year. Prerequisite: 12 credits in RES or by permission of the instructor.

RES-499: Research in Religious and Ethical StudiesSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Open to Junior and Senior RES majors.

SOC-100: Principles of SociologySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to the concepts, methods and theories employed by sociologists to understand societies, social institutions, and the myriad expressions of group life. The course explores the cultural contexts of human behavior to
explain individual and group interaction, social mobility and inequality, relations framed by class, gender and race, and patterns of socialization, deviance and social change.

SOC-220: Gender and SocietySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year, Varies, Contact Department Head

What does sex have to do with gender? What does gender have to do with social systems? This course explores these questions by looking at the ways in which sociologists have theorized and written about gender. Students will explore what it means to understand gender as a social and cultural construct as well as the impact that these constructions have on the lived experiences of individuals in society. Additionally the course will examine the complex ways in which gender intersects and interacts with other facets of our social identities including race, class and sexual orientation.

SOC-231: Social ProblemsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This examination of American Society places an emphasis on the institutional bases of social problems and conflict as well as the policies designed to address these problems. Topics include poverty, racism, environmental threat,  crime and violence, and other contemporary challenges. Attention is consistently directed to the influences of these social problems on women’s lives as well as the ethical dilemmas and debates surrounding the solutions to these problems.

SOC-235:Session(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

In this course, students will learn to use quantitative data through participation in an applied research project. Students will identify appropriate quantitative data to answer a research question and then use technological tools to organize, analyze and present that data. By the conclusion of the course students will generate a tangible product showcasing their participation in this project. Also offered as COM 235, HIS 235 and POL 235.

SOC-236: CriminologySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course explores questions about the criminal law, criminal conduct, the risks of criminal victimization and prevailing crime control policies. Theories developed to explain why individuals offend and why crime rates vary are examined in light of research findings, so that students gain a thorough understanding of crime and its causes. These ideas are applied to conventional street crime as well as to organized crime and elite crime.

SOC-240: Introduction to Forensic StudiesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course is intended to offer students an overview of various elements of the criminal investigation process, from police detective work to forensic science processes.  We will use a sociological perspective to examine such topics as: homicide investigation, cold case files and police investigative techniques and an introduction to forensic analyses including fingerprinting, ballistics, forensic accounting, cyber forensics and DNA processes.  Students will learn about changes over time, investigation techniques and science applications in the criminal justice system and how these changes have affected political, social and economic interests in society.

SOC-242: Deviance and SocietySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course is based on the premise that deviance is a socially constructed phenomenon. This means that the attributes, behaviors and conditions humans label ‘deviant’ vary over time and place, as do societal reactions to them. Students will be introduced to agents of social control, both formal and informal, as well as the role such control and power differentials plays in defining, labeling, and sanctioning deviant behavior. The material covered in the course examines theories of deviant behavior, how social scientists study deviant behavior, how deviant behavior is socially constructed, how people manage deviant identities, how relationships operate in deviant subcultures and countercultures, and the relationships between deviant subcultures and mainstream culture.

SOC-260: Cultural AnthropologySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Understanding the power of culture in shaping our lives depends on knowing the ways of life displayed all around the world. This course introduces students to the discoveries of anthropologists as they have lived among preliterate and preindustrial people, and as they apply their signature methodologies to culturally distinctive communities in today’s world. Comparing how a range of cultures address the challenges of social existence sets the stage for enlightening dialogue.

SOC-299: Introduction to Research in SociologySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Open to freshmen and sophomores who have an interest in sociology and who would like to work individually with a faculty member on a project involving research from a sociological perspective. The student will formulate and execute a research project at an intermediate level of complexity and present results to an appropriate public audience. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-332: Human SexualitySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The research literature on sexual interests, behaviors and relationships is reviewed through study of the changing practices and perceptions of sexuality in America. Topics include the cultural construction of sex, the process of learning to be sexual, sexual deviance, the influence of marriage, and the interplay between sex and power in our society. Recognition of both risks and rewards associated with sexuality provides the context for studying controversial policies in society. Also offered as HED-332.

SOC-335: Race and Ethnic RelationsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Patterns of relationship among racial and ethnic groups in the United States are analyzed. This course explores inequalities of wealth, power, and status along with the persistence of racism, movements to advance civil rights and efforts by groups to maintain social boundaries. Current trends in intergroup relations are discussed to explore how changing demographic racial patterns may affect future definitions of race and ethnicity. Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-337: CorrectionsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A study of the criminal justice system; police, attorneys, courts, judges, jails, prisons, parole. Attention is given to conflicting punishment philosophies and practices. Studies of inmate society are highlighted in this survey of America’s attempts to correct the crime problem. Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-338: Sociology of FamiliesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course will provide students with an overview of the family from a sociological perspective. Students in the course will examine transformation of the family across time as well as its position as both a private and public institution. Topics include defining a family, gender and power, courtship and marriage, parenting, divorce and remarriage, work, and family violence. Particular attention is placed on the roles of women in the family and the ways in which families impact the lived experiences of the women in them. Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-340: Sociology of AgingSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

As the elderly population increases what challenges do these individuals face and what impact will they have on society? Students in this course will examine the physical, psychological and sociological dimensions of the aging process in order to gain insight on these questions. Topics include retirement, poverty and old age, Social Security and Medicare debates, long term care and end of life decisions, and issues related to the growing elderly population in the United States. Prerequisite: at least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-342: Juvenile DelinquencySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course examines the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency, measurement issues and the various sociological and other relevant social science theories of the causes of this phenomenon. Policy implications of these theories and the current research in the field and historical trends in juvenile delinquency are discussed and evaluations of treatment and prevention programs in the local community as well as the larger society are examined.  Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-343: Sociology of MurderSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course will analyze homicide from macro and micro sociological perspectives. We will critically analyze the phenomenon of homicide and the reactions to it both broadly (macro) and deeply (micro). Using sociological imagination to understanding homicide from a critical perspective in which the relationship between the lives of individuals and the larger social forces that help to shape their lives will be identified. We will focus on political, economic and cultural forces including gender and race that impact on homicide and how individuals in society view and react to different types of homicide. We will discuss the consequences of homicide for both individuals and society, and different types of possible intervention strategies based on different theoretical approaches to the socio-scientific study of murder. We will explore reasons, and possible implications, for the fascination surrounding homicide in the United States. We will examine the laws, the courts, and how law enforcement investigate homicide cases.

SOC-344: Visual SociologySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

In this course we will explore how visual methods – mainly photography and film – are used to examine society and culture. At the core of our course is a focus on two themes: (1) how to use visual methods to capture and interpret sociological phenomena, and (2) the impact that visual images and representations have on individuals, groups, and society. Throughout the course, we will also consider how visual images construct, shape, and alter our reality. You will be introduced to a range of visual methodologies used by sociologists and other social scientists, including documentary photography, photo essay, photovoice, and documentary filmmaking. Some other themes of the course include: ethics and privacy in documentary work, using images for social change, participatory research, and changing visual media. Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-346: Anthropology of ReligionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course focuses on the ways in which religion and human culture intersect.  We will look at such themes as myth, symbol, magic and ritual and see how they contribute to the formation of human societies.  Students will  engage in a local field research project to learn how anthropologists study religion. Pre-requisite: One 100-level RES, course or by permission of instructor. Also offered as RES-346.

SOC-348: Sociology of ZombiesSession(s): Summer | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course will examine the current popularity of TV shows and movies about Zombies. What social concerns does this popular culture phenomenon reflect—fears about the government response to pandemics, self-defense, or just our general nervousness about death? The course will analyze the first two seasons of the TV show, The Walking Dead in terms of the effect on society and group formation in the aftermath of a major pandemic. We will discuss issues about when violence is acceptable, the ways that group dynamics in survival situations are presented, and the gender, social class and race issues acted out among the primary cast members.  What happens in a crisis that is so dramatically social and what is acceptable behavior in order to survive?

SOC-360: Media, Self and SocietySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

What is ‘the media’ and how can it impact the ways in which we see the world and ourselves in it? This course will examine these questions as we examine the roles that various media forms play in our society, particularly in regards to issues of identity across lines of race, class, gender and sexuality. Students will examine historical and theoretical aspects of the media from both sociological and cultural studies perspectives, the ways in which mainstream and alternative media construct identities, and the impact that these images have on the society in which they circulate. Prerequisite: At least 3 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-374: Social Research PrinciplesSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course will explore the logic of scientific inquiry. Throughout the course, students will explore the relationship between theory and methodology, the nature of causation, components of research design and a variety of methods for social science research. Guidance in retrieving information, reviewing and evaluating research reports, and constructing a research proposal is provided. Prerequisites: SOC-100, SOC-231or SOC-260, MAT-175.

SOC-410: Women and PoliticsSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course will examine the causes and consequences of women’s incarceration. We will use sociological and criminological theorizing to understand why and how women’s incarceration rates have increased over the last three decades. We will examine the impact this trend has on individuals, families and communities. Key topics within the course include: women’s pathways to criminal involvement; the relationship between women’s physical and sexual victimization and their incarceration; the impacts of women’s incarceration on children and families; and current efforts to re-integrate women into society post-incarceration. Although we will focus mainly on incarcerated women in contemporary culture, we will also consider other historical contexts, such as the origins of women’s “reformatories” and the evolution of women’s incarceration over time. To deepen our understanding of these issues, we will also apply an intersectional analysis to focus on how marginalized women are impacted by the criminal justice system and mass incarceration. Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in sociology or permission of instructor.

SOC-421: Gender and ViolenceSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This course will examine the intersections of gender and violence. We will use sociological theorizing to understand why, how, and when violence is gendered and assess the impact and consequences on individuals, communities, and society. Key topics within the course include: rape and sexual violence, intimate partner violence, stalking, female genital mutilation, mass shootings, war, pornography, violence against LGBTQ people, and sex trafficking. To deepen our understanding of these issues, we will also apply an intersectional analysis to focus on how different marginalized groups are impacted by gender-based violence. Although we focus mainly on contemporary gender-based violence in the U.S., we will also consider other cultural and historical contexts. Prerequisites: At least 6 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-422: Genders and SexualitiesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

Our ideas about gender – about women, men masculinity, and femininity – as well as our ideas about sexuality – about sexual activities, whom should have sex with whom – organize our social life in important ways that we often do not even notice. These ideas are either invisible to us (such that we take them for granted as “normal”) or are explained away (such that they seem like the “natural” way life works). In this course we investigate and expose those aspects of social life that often go unquestioned. We will critically examine the ways in which gender and sexuality inform and are informed by the social work in which we live; we will identify the gender and sexual hierarchies in US society; and we will look at attempts to destabilize these hierarchies.
Prerequisite: At least 6 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-430: Population DynamicsSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Trace the effects of births, deaths and migration on population size, composition and distribution around the world. Examine the effects of population changes on the environment, the world’s resources, and on global security. Socioeconomic, political and religious institutions will be explored and the status of women around the world will be related to demographic change. Demographic trends in the United States are evaluated in the context of global influence.

SOC-431: Sociology of InequitiesSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Explanations for social inequalities are considered along with current research on class, status, power and social mobility. Both national and international patterns of wealth and poverty are inspected to explain “who gets what and why.” Inequalities of households, of population groups and of nations as they participate on the global stage receive specific treatment. Prerequisites: at least 6 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-440: Selected Topics in SociologySession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Customized by the professor to reflect specialized areas of knowledge or new advances in the field, this course introduces students to compelling publications and/or media that will extend their grasp of sociological analysis.  Selections spotlight issues associated with active public dialogue with the objective of discovering how sociology speaks to those issues.  Course numbers advance as topics shift to favor additional enrollments as desired.  Prerequisite:  At least 6 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-442: The Color of CrimeSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course examines the roles of minorities as offenders, victims, and employees in the criminal justice system.  An assessment of statistics, research, and the literature as it relates to minorities and crime will be included. Public perceptions of race and crime and the interactions of police, courts and juries in terms of the race of victims and perpetrators will be examined. Research on racial bias in jury decisions, sentencing, and the death penalty will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: 6 hours in SOC.

SOC-443: Women and CrimeSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered

This course focuses on the experiences of women in the criminal justice system. The study of crime throughout our history has focused overwhelmingly on males and this has often resulted in hiding the experiences of women. We will examine how gender shapes women‘s experiences as victims, as offenders and career professionals in law enforcement. The experiences of women in prison and the effect on their families will be examined. The intersections of race and social class will be examined as well. Prerequisite: 6 hours in SOC.

SOC-444: Social InteractionSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course introduces the basic sociological concepts underpinning the study of social interaction. This content is grounded in the sociological subfield of social psychology and microsociology.  After exploring the foundational questions, concepts and theories of social interaction, students will examine the role that socially constructed identities play in producing social interaction, looking at patterns of interaction through the lenses of gender, race, class, age and sexuality. The course will examine the interplay between various levels of social interaction, particularly between the individual and the institutional settings of social life. Prerequisite: 6 hours in SOC or permission of instructor.

SOC-446: Drugs and SocietySession(s): Summer | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

The purpose of this course is to analyze the organization and consumption of drugs in the United States. Both legal and illegal drug use will be examined in terms of consumption and legal issues as well as social effects on individuals, families and communities. The politics and economics of both pharmacological and criminal justice institutions and drugs will be examined. Prerequisite: 3 hours in SOC.

SOC-449: Sociology of the BorderSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course focuses on the border between the US and Mexico, a border that is over 2,000 miles between two countries which are very different. The course will examine the push/pull factors that have led to immigration from Mexico, and some of the changes in that situation in recent years. The role of the border patrol in regulating the border and dealing with crime and the unique culture created along the border with the mix of cultures will be examined. Topics include the drug trade, violence against women, the economic realities of businesses on both sides of the border and finally the current politics of immigration in both the US and Mexico. Prerequisite: 6 hours in SOC or permission of instructor.

SOC-480: Community InternshipSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

The internship is a learning experience involving work in a community, criminal justice or criminological setting.  Interns are expected to gain valuable work experience as well as relevant knowledge which will add to their overall understanding of the field of sociology or criminology.  Internship positions must center on learning new material over the course of the semester and interns are expected to participate in ongoing training and development. Students in Criminology of the Double major or Sociology and Criminology must do a placement that connects to the Criminology field. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: At least 6 hours in the sociology field.

SOC-489: Social TheorySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

From the origins of sociological thinking to the current controversies regarding social action and social structure, explanations developed by sociologists to describe and to demystify society are studied and applied. Ideas advanced by Durkheim, Marx and Weber are followed by extensions and alternatives up to and including the Frankfurt School, Feminism and Post Modernism. Prerequisite: at least 6 credit hours in SOC.

SOC-495: Professional DevelopmentSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This career/graduate school preparation course for the Sociology or Criminology major is an opportunity for students to make plans for their futures after graduation. Students will complete a variety of exercises and oral presentations meant to prepare them for graduate school or a job in public service, law enforcement, the non-profit sector or the private sector.
Prerequisites: Open to Sociology or Criminology majors only. Must have senior standing or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: SOC 496 or permission of the instructor

SOC-496: Research CapstoneSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

This capstone course for the Sociology or Criminology major is an opportunity for students to use their sociological imaginations to formulate solutions to the problems that face our world today. All students will utilize sociological or criminological theories, literature, methods and data to explore a macro-level social problem chosen by them or the sociology faculty. Findings of the semester long project will be presented to sociology faculty, students, and the broader Meredith community. Prerequisites: SOC 374, and either MAT-175 or MAT-248. Open to Sociology or Criminology majors only. Must have senior standing or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: SOC 495 or permission of the instructor

SOC-498: Honors Thesis in SociologySession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a sociology faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the sociology faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. Prerequisites: 3 credit hours in SOC, SOC-374, and either MAT-175 or MAT-248.

SOC-499: Research in SociologySession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

In conjunction with a sociology faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisites: 3 credit from SOC, SOC-374, and either MAT-175 or MAT-248.

SPA-101: Elementary Spanish ISession(s): Fall; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

Introduction to modern spoken Spanish. English will be used in the classroom for orientation purposes only. Independent language laboratory work required each week.

SPA-102: Elementary Spanish IISession(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A review and continuation of SPA-101. English will be used in the classroom for orientation purposes only. Independent language laboratory work required each week. Prerequisite: SPA-101.

SPA-205: Intermediate Spanish ISession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

A review and continuation of SPA-102, and gradual introduction of graded readings. Independent language laboratory work required each week. Prerequisite: SPA-102.

SPA-206: Intermediate Spanish IISession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A continuation of SPA-205. Emphasis on the reading and discussion in Spanish of texts of moderate difficulty. Independent language laboratory work required each week. Prerequisite: SPA-205.

SPA-207: Spanish Beyond the ClassroomSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A course in conversational Spanish which focuses on increasing a student’s oral proficiency at the intermediate level. Emphasis is placed on the proper pronunciation of the language and on listening and speaking. The class also includes a community-based learning component and service hours spent in the community. It may be repeated once for credit through an approved program of study abroad. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA-206 or equivalent.

SPA-299: Introduction to Research in SpanishSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Working with a faculty mentor from the department, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an intermediate level of complexity. In her project, the student will investigate an aspect of Spanish or Hispanophone literature, culture or civilization of personal interest and, as a culminating experience, prepare a paper or other research project whose outcomes or conclusions she also proposes and discusses in a public forum. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. Research performed in connection with study abroad is strongly encouraged. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisites: 3 credits from SPA at Level 200.

SPA-300: Life and Study AbroadSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Intensive study and homestay in a Spanish-speaking country. Credit awarded according to departmental guidelines. Permission of department required to enroll. Pass/Fail grading only.

SPA-302: Topics in Language and CultureSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course is offered only in connection with the department’s programs of study in a Spanish-speaking country. Since instruction is in Spanish, the course carries as a prerequisite the completion of second-year language study. The course may entail instruction before, during, and after the experience abroad. Credit is awarded according to the following guidelines: Completion of assigned readings: 1 hour; Completion of a paper or journal: 1 hour; Participation in a series of organized visits: 1 hour. Depending on the objectives of the foreign study program, directors may require any combination of the above elements, but in no case will more than three credit hours be awarded for the course. SPA 302 may be repeated once for credit through an approved program of study abroad. Pass/Fail grading may be elected by the student. Instructor’s consent required. Prerequisites: SPA-206, SPA-207.

SPA-303: Identities of SpainSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

Students in this course explore the history and diverse cultures of Spain from antiquity to the consolidation of the nation, ending with the study of the contemporary social, cultural, and political make-up of Spanish society. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPA-207 or equivalent.

SPA-304: Identities of Latin AmericaSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Students in this course explore the history and diverse cultures of Latin America from Pre-Columbian and colonial times to independence, ending with the study of the contemporary social, cultural, artistic, and political make-up of its societies. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA-207.

SPA-305: Spanish Phonetics and PhonologySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course focuses on students’ pronunciation, intonation, and oral proficiency. One hour of non-credit language laboratory required each week. May be taken without prerequisite courses with permission of instructor. Prerequisites: SPA-206, SPA-207 or equivalent.

SPA-306: Written Communication in SpanishSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Study of complex grammar structures.  Designed to improve students’ writing skills.  Required of all majors and minors in Spanish.  Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA-207 or equivalent.

SPA-307: Spanish in the CommunitySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course focuses on developing oral proficiency at the advanced level. Students will engage in conversations about numerous topics relevant to the Spanish-speaking community in the US and abroad. They will learn to express abstract ideas about the intricacies of culture and global issues. All students will be required to complete service-learning hours and reflect on how the experience connects to class topics. Open to juniors and seniors or to other students with special permission of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. SPA 307 may be repeated once for credit through an approved program of study abroad. Prerequisite: SPA-306.

SPA-308: Discovering Literature in SpanishSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course introduces students to basic techniques for approaching and examining different literary genres in Spanish.  Selected readings include poetry, short story, and drama. Recommended as an introduction to literature.  Required of all Spanish majors.
Prerequisites: SPA-206, SPA-207 or equivalent.

SPA-310: Spanish for Social ServicesSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course is designed to provide students with the linguistic tools and cultural knowledge to allow them to successfully work in a variety of professional social service settings. Topics will include, but not be limited to the following: welfare, Social Security, government subsidies, employment training programs, Medicaid, childcare and elder care.  Through engaging activities and assignments students will gain awareness of social issues affecting the Spanish-speaking community while developing their ability to use their language skills in a professional setting.  Prerequisites: SPA-207 or placement at the 300-level.

SPA-311: Spanish for BusinessSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

An advanced-level course to orient students’ functional use of Spanish to the world of business from a Hispanic cultural perspective. Students will report on current events, trade accords among nations and intercultural issues in the workplace. Prerequisites: Successful completion (grade of C or better) of Intermediate Spanish II (SPA-206) is required and Advanced Composition and Grammar (SPA-306) is preferred. Students who wish to take Business Spanish without having completed SPA-306 should seek the permission of the instructor.

SPA-321: Language and SocietySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course explores the relationship between language and society. Through the study of linguistic communities, students will examine the various contexts in which communities use language to express their identity and social behavior, including the sociocultural rules of appropriate language use. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 207.

SPA-331: Spanish and Latin American FilmSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course is designed to help the student improve oral and written communication in Spanish and to become familiar with major Hispanic films, directors, and actors and their contributions to cinematic art. Through the medium of film, students will develop a deeper awareness of Hispanic culture and of global affairs. Prerequisite: SPA-206, SPA-207 or equivalent.

SPA-332: From Page to Stage: experiencing Literature Beyond the TextSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

In this course students will explore the various ways that literature from the Spanish-speaking world can be reimagined through performance.  This not only means seeing performances both virtually and in person, but also staging them in a number of different settings.  Prerequisites: SPA-306, placement at the 300-level, or special permission from the instructor.

SPA-335: Special Topics in Literature and CultureSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

Intensive study of related authors, a particular group or generation, a movement, a genre, and/or a particular work. Topics and texts relevant to Spanish, Latin American and/or U.S. Latino contexts. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Topic is announced each time the course is offered. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPA-308.

SPA-336: Traveling Home: Literature By/For US LatinasSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course explores the many borders (gender, language, class, race, etc.) Latina writers cross as they negotiate what it means to be both Hispanic and U.S. American without really belonging anywhere.  Students will read a wide variety of texts in Spanish and English, ranging from novels and essays to memoirs and graphic novels.  The course is conducted in Spanish with English used whenever applicable.  Prerequisites: SPA-306, placement at the 300-level, or special permission from the instructor.

SPA-337: Exploring/Constructing Identities in Latin America through Literature, Music and DanceSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Literature, music and dance – although different artistic genres – are closely related as essential parts of the construction of national, regional and racial identity in Latin America.  This course will explore the fluid boundaries between the three genres and their fundamental role in identity construction.  Prerequisites: SPA-306, placement at the 300-level, or special permission from the instructor.

SPA-385: Basic Concepts of Spanish TranslationSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course aims to increase the student’s reading proficiency in Spanish and writing skills in both Spanish and English through grammar review, practice, vocabulary expansion, and translation from and sometimes into the foreign language. Content includes basic principles of translation, translation skills and techniques. A variety of general and semi-technical texts in Spanish will be studied. Course includes guest speakers, weekly independent assignments in translation, and a final translation research project. Class will be conducted in English and Spanish. Prerequisites: SPA-306 or permission of the instructor.

SPA-386: Advanced Spanish Translation PracticeSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This course aims to apply advanced proficiency in reading and writing to translation both from and into the target language. Content applies and expounds upon principles from SPA 385, including translation theory, skills and techniques, language levels, lexicography, transposition and equivalence. A variety of semi- and technical texts in the target language will be read in depth. Course includes guest speakers, weekly independent assignments in translation, and a final translation research project. Class sessions and lectures will be conducted in English and Spanish. Prerequisites: SPA-385 or permission of the instructor.

SPA-387: Basic Concepts of InterpretingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

This is a practical and theoretical introduction to interpreting in professional and community settings such as health care, human services and education.  The course includes theory and practice in the modes on interpretation, interpreter ethics, roles of the interpreter, memory development and note-taking skills, as well as exposure to specialized topics and terminology. Prerequisites: SPA-306 and SPA-385, or special permission from the instructor; SPA-207 and SPA-307 recommended.

SPA-475: Community Internship: Field HoursSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

This is a supervised experience in which the student uses her Spanish skills in a professional setting.  Possible placements may include not-for-profit agencies, companies, governmental agencies and schools (excluding student teaching). Students must work 40 hours at the internship for each credit hour they wish to earn for SPA-476. Prerequisite: SPA-306 or placement at the 300-level.  Must complete SPA-476 in same term or following term.

SPA-476: Community Internship: Critical ReflectionSession(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year

This course is designed to help the student critically reflect on her experiences at her internship.  She will consider challenges at her internship, the realities of the Spanish-speaking communities where she works, and develop possible solutions to improve the services offered at her placement.  SPA-475 is a prerequisite or co-requisite.  May be repeated for a total of six hours of credit.  Pass/Fail grading only. Permission required from the department head.    Prerequisite: SPA-306 or placement at the 300-level. Must complete SPA-475 in same term or previous term.

SPA-498: Honors Thesis in SpanishSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Working with a faculty mentor from the department, the honors student investigates an aspect of Spanish language or Hispanophone literature, culture or civilization of personal interest and prepares a paper or other research product whose conclusions or outcomes she also proposes and discusses in a public forum. Weekly meetings. It is expected that the honors student will spend at least ten hours per week on her thesis. Fulfills honors thesis requirement. Research performed in connection with study abroad is strongly encouraged. Prerequisites: 15 credits from SPA at Level 300 or above.

SPA-499: Junior and Senior Research in SpanishSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

Working with a faculty mentor from the department, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity. In her project, the student will investigate an aspect of Spanish or Hispanophone language or literature, culture or civilization of personal interest, and, as a culminating experience, prepare a paper or other research project whose outcomes or conclusions she also proposes and discusses in a public forum.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Research performed in connection with study abroad is strongly encouraged. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisite: 12 credits from SPA at Level 300 or above.

THE-101: Performance PracticaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The practicum is designed to give the student practical theatre experience through production, performance or front of house work.  Practica may be taken a maximum of eight times for credit.

THE-102: Performance PracticaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The practicum is designed to give the student practical theatre experience through production, performance or front of house work.  Practica may be taken a maximum of eight times for credit.

THE-103: Production PracticaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The practicum is designed to give the student practical theatre experience through production, performance or front of house work.  Practica may be taken a maximum of eight times for credit.

THE-104: Production PracticaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The practicum is designed to give the student practical theatre experience through production, performance or front of house work.  Practica may be taken a maximum of eight times for credit.

THE-105: Front of House PracticaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The practicum is designed to give the student practical theatre experience through production, performance or front of house work.  Practica may be taken a maximum of eight times for credit.

THE-106: Front of House PracticaSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The practicum is designed to give the student practical theatre experience through production, performance or front of house work.  Practica may be taken a maximum of eight times for credit.

THE-114: Introduction to TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the art of theatre through an exploration of Aristotelian dramatic theory, the principles of acting, directing, and design; and major events in theatre history.  A student experiences theatre through the analysis of dramatic literature and criticism as related to play attendance.

THE-150: Voice and ArticulationSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A course designed to develop flexibility and expression in the human voice, it is intended for, but not limited to, students who wish to have a career in which strong verbal skills are important. Units include phonetics, accent reduction (Standard American English), projection, resonance, articulation, breathing, vocal anatomy and vocal variety.

THE-214: Creative DramaticsSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

Creative dramatics is an area of study which involves drama experiences (pantomimes, improvisations, movement, songs, and games) which are process-not product-oriented for the growth and development of students rather than for the entertainment of the audience. This course includes lectures, readings, and practical opportunities for experience. Observations in area elementary schools and the development of a resource file are required.

THE-224: Acting ISession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

The beginning acting student is introduced to the theories and practical skills of the Stanislavski system including relaxation, concentration, warm-up techniques, and improvisation exercises. Participation in scene study and monologue work as well as applying the basics of scoring are explored. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-245: StagecraftSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

A study and application of the technical elements of theatre production.  Major emphasis will be given to scenic construction and materials used in technical production. Laboratory hours will be arranged for practical experience in scenic arts and crafts. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-246: Lighting and SoundSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to the basics of electricity, as they apply to theatre, and a survey of the fundamental lighting and sound processes and equipment. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: THE-245.

THE-247: Costume and MakeupSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to the basics of costume and makeup design and the processes of costume construction and makeup applications for the stage through practical laboratory experience. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: THE-245.

THE-299: Research in TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in an original research project with a faculty mentor. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-316: History of Theatre Classic-RomanceSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

The course will guide the student through the cultural exploration of the origin and development of theatre, dramatic literature and its structure and genres, dramatic theory, the principles of performance, and techniques of production (including costuming, scenic design, and company structure), from the beginning to about 1870. Western and non-western theatre history will be examined. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-317: History of Theatre Modern-ContemporarySession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

The course will guide the student through the cultural exploration of the development of modern theatre, contemporary dramatic literature, modern dramatic theory, the principles of performance, and techniques of production (including costuming, scenic design, and company structure), from 1870 to the present. Western and non-western theatre history will be examined.  May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent.  Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-324: Acting IISession(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year

Using the work done in Acting I as a foundation, this course focuses on the advanced acting theories of Stanislavski, including sense and emotion memory. Through scene work and monologues, the student explores more complicated characterizations, difficult dramatic genres, and the audition process. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of four times. Prerequisite: THE-224.

THE-335: Scenic Design and PaintingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

The course will explore the art of scenic design and painting. The student will be exposed to the process of drafting, rendering and building three-dimensional models for stage settings. She will also practice the techniques used by scenic artists to paint backdrops and faux finishes for the theatre. May be taken without prerequisite courses with instructor’s consent. Prerequisites: THE-114, THE-245.

THE-350: Modern DramaSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A study of modern theatre from 1875 to the present, this course will look at the development of drama through playwrights and their works. Beginning with Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, and Shaw, the class will explore important twentieth century plays and conclude with contemporary drama. Work will include substantial reading and writing, with viewing and reviewing of performances. Also offered as ENG-350. Prerequisite: ENG-200.

THE-370: PlaywritingSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

An introduction to the basic tools of playwriting, students will explore the fundamentals of writing for the stage through formal and informal exercises. They will learn how to use constructive criticism to improve their work and the work of others. The semester will culminate with a performance of staged readings of the students’ projects.

THE-390: Audition and InterviewSession(s): Spring | Course Offered Even-Numbered Years Only

This course is intended to instill professional behaviors, better auditioning techniques, and polished interview skills to upper level Theatre majors. A team taught course of study, Performance students will hone their auditioning skills under the instruction of various instructors and invited guest artists in the industry. Design and technical students will undergo rigorous portfolio building, training and review by various instructors and invited guest artists. Interview skills will also be a focus for both populations.
Prerequisite: THE 114

THE-424: Acting III Meisner TrainingSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

Building on the skills learned in Acting II, the advanced acting student will deepen her understanding of the craft of acting through the study of the Meisner approach.
Prerequisite: THE 324

THE-425: DirectingSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

Basics of casting, staging and play analysis are reviewed. Scenes are presented in class. A one-act play must be produced for public performance. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-480: Internship: Area of SpecializationSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course consists of an internship in theatre management, or in production and an evaluation of the experience under the guidance of an on-campus instructor. The student will work with a theatre company or an arts organization to explore contemporary theatre practices. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-490: Project: Area of SpecializationSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

A project, selected by the theatre major in consultation with her adviser, will be completed that will focus on her area of specialization (performance, production, management, etc.).

THE-496: Seminar in Musical TheatreSession(s): Fall | Course Offered Odd-Numbered Years Only

Study of the history of musical theatre; analysis of musical scripts and characters; performance of scenes and excerpts. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-498: Honors Thesis in TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An introduction to theories, methods, and ethics of aesthetic inquiry.  In conjunction with a  faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a research paper and/or performance work. A “Research Course Information Form” completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. The research project must meet Honors Program Thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the Theatre faculty. Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only.

THE-499: Research in TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course will provide opportunities for juniors and seniors to participate in an original research project with a faculty mentor. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisite: THE-114.

THE-580: Advanced Internship in TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

This course provides an academic connection to and context for students in a supervised internship with a professional or semi-professional theatre company as performers, designers, or production crew or staff. Students will work 40 hours per credit as part of the company in specified areas. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Certificate in Theatre Program.

THE-590: Advanced Practicum in TheatreSession(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year

An advanced practicum in professional theatre designed to give students practical knowledge and experience preparing them for careers within the national not-for-profit and commercial theatre. Students must work 40 hours per credit in Musical Theatre, Theatre Performance or Design/Technical Theatre with an approved professional theatre company. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Certificate in Theatre Program.

THE-735: Methods of Teaching TheatreSession(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head

This course provides basic instruction in teaching methods for theatre, using behavioral, instructional objectives as the basis for development. Students will develop a philosophy of teaching theatre; organize units and lesson plans; question, criticize, and reformulate assumptions about the nature of their work through reflection on their own teaching methods. Prerequisite: THE-214. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.
 


Curriculum requirements and course descriptions are subject to changes with each catalogue.

Contact Information
Sarah Roth
Dean, Arts & Humanities
230 Joyner Hall
snroth@meredith.edu
(919) 760-8541