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The relationship between creative behavior and child growth through the visual arts is developed through research, practicum situations, and extensive early field experience. Methods for teaching exceptional children are also studied. Curriculum development is an integral part of the class. Twelve hours of studio art must be completed prior to registering for this class. Offered in rotation with ART-734, ART-736. Studio fee assessed. Prerequisites: ART-221 or ART-222.  Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

A study of teaching methodologies appropriate for middle and high school students through research, practicum situations, and extensive early field experiences. Attention is given to adolescent development and its effect on creative visual development and the need for visual expression. Art health hazards, computer competencies and curriculum development are among topics covered. Twelve hours of studio art must be completed before registering for this course. Studio fee assessed. Offered in rotation with ART-734 and ART-735. Prerequisites: ART-221 or ART-222.  Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

A study of dance in public school settings with a focus on teaching methods. Content includes observations, writing lesson plans, exploring and experiencing teaching approaches, and examining methods of evaluation.  Prerequisites: DAN-761. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

A course designed to provide the student with directed field experience in teaching dance. Course content includes developing lesson plans, guided teaching experiences, and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on critical reflection about teaching and learning. Prerequisites: DAN-761, DAN-762 and admission to licensure program. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

This course provides an in-depth study of the theories, research and instructional methods associated with reading and learning processes across the different content areas of the curriculum. Special emphasis is given to adolescent learners and the literacy tools essential for life-long learning, including critical thinking, problem-solving and digital literacy skills.

This course explores major theories and models for understanding how children and adolescents learn; seeks to understand the complex interaction among biological, sociocultural, and psychological factors that influence learning; applies this knowledge about learning to learning and teaching in schools; and investigates the interplay between school culture and students' cultures and the implications for student achievement. The course begins with a sharp focus on the students as an individual learner, then centers on the individual working with a teacher, and finally centers on the learner in cultural context. Explanations of structural barriers to student achievement are examined including stereotype threat, curriculum-home communication mismatch, the privileging of certain approaches to learning, and solutions for teachers are investigated. The importance of close observation of children/adolescents and careful consideration of actual student achievement data in sociocultural context are stressed. Field experiences required.

One challenge that teachers face is how to work with a broad range of cultural, linguistic, and intellectual differences among their students. This course will examine differences and similarities among students and explore sociocultural and structural influences on student achievement. It will address the questions, “Who are the students in the classroom?” and “What must teachers consider when planning and implementing instruction for all of their students?”  The course will focus on basic concepts related to addressing student needs through differentiation, inclusion, and teaching English as a Second Language. Field experiences required.
 

This course is designed to give teachers the knowledge and skills to create and maintain effective learning environments. One important aspect of classroom management, behavior management, will be given particular focus. Teachers will understand how to implement positive behavior support (PBS) to help their students learn and engage in appropriate behavior. Field experiences required. 

This course will critically examine the role of technology in the K-12 classroom and incorporate the basic technology tools of teachers, their application and the ethics associated with the profession Field experiences required. 

Designed to provide a full-time experience at the appropriate grade level within the area of specialization. Internships are offered in the areas of Elementary Education (K-6), English as a Second Language (K-12), or Special Education (K-12).  The candidate engages in a variety of supervised instructional activities, with gradual induction into full-time teaching responsibilities. The candidate will be supervised by both a cooperating teacher in a public school classroom and a college supervisor from the Meredith faculty.All program requirements must be met prior to enrollment. Co-requisites: EDUG-795. Fee assessed. 
 

A capstone seminar taken concurrently with the graduate internship. This course is designed to strengthen the professional skills of reflection as related to instructional practice, assessment and evaluation of student learning, and analysis of personal and effective classroom practices. Emphasis is placed on the five areas of the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards. Pass/Fail. Fee Assessed.  Co-requisites: EDUG-790.
 

Creative dramatics is an area of study which involves drama experiences (pantomimes, improvisations, movement, songs, and games) which are process- not product-oriented for the growth and development of students rather than for the entertainment of the audience. This course includes lectures, readings, and practical opportunities for experience. Observations in area elementary schools and the development of a resource file are required. (Spring, as needed) 

This course provides basic instruction in teaching methods for theatre, using behavioral, instructional objectives as the basis for development. Students will develop a philosophy of teaching theatre; organize units and lesson plans; question, criticize, and reformulate assumptions about the nature of their work through reflection on their own teaching methods. Prerequisite: THE-214. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

Thank you for your Interest!

You can connect with a graduate admissions counselor in a variety of ways—choose the one that’s most convenient for you. We look forward to hearing from you!

gradeducation@meredith.edu
(919) 760-8316


Strong Story | Larissa Byrant

After graduating with her MAT, Larissa Bryant, ’13, was well prepared to become a teacher and to have a positive impact on her students’ future.


After graduating with her MAT, Larissa Bryant, ’13, was well prepared to become a teacher and to have a positive impact on her students’ future.

Contact Information  
207 Ledford Hall
(919) 760-8316
gradeducation@meredith.edu
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