An introduction to biological concepts designed for non-science majors. This course presents the central principles of biological theory: Cell structure and metabolisms, reproduction, genetics, biodiversity, ecology and evolution in relation to current issues. The course provides students with an understanding of the living world through the process of science. Three lecture hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-145. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO 105/145 or BIO 110/151.

An introductory biology course designed for students with interest in pursuing a major in science. This course provides a rigorous scientific basis for the central concepts of biology and prepares students with a foundation for further study. Areas of study include biochemical aspects of cells, eukaryotic cellular structure, principles of cellular reproduction, mechanisms of inheritance, and processes of energy production and utilization. Three lecture hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-151. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-105/145 or BIO-110/151.

An introductory laboratory designed for non-science majors. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the principles considered in BIO-105. Topics include cellular structure, respiration and photosynthesis, ecological, relationships, DNA structure and function, cellular reproduction, genetics, and evolution. Meets two hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-105. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-105/145 or BIO-110/151.

An introductory laboratory designed for students with interest in pursuing a major in science. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the principles considered in BIO-110. Topics include cellular structure, respiration, photosynthesis, DNA structure and function, cellular and organismal reproduction, and genetics. Meets two hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-110. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-105/145 or BIO 110/151.

An introduction to terminology used in the health professions. This is an on-line, self-paced course covering root words, suffixes, and prefixes commonly used in healthcare professional settings. Students will be guided through development of a medical vocabulary and use of this knowledge to analyze primary literature in the medical field and present of medical information.

The course will provide exposure to professions related to the life sciences, physical sciences and environmental sustainability.  Using student identified Strengths from StrengthsQuest, students will develop the professional skill sets to start a career path in various science and sustainability fields.  Employment opportunities at all levels (technician, field specialist, human resources, sales, marketing, education, writing, advocacy, management, coordinator, etc.) in nonprofit, government, academic, and private sector industries will be discussed.  Also offered as CHE-201.  

This course introduces students to concepts of inter-professional education as it is being practiced in the field of healthcare.  Students will be guided through reflection on ethical and practical issues of a career in the healthcare field.  Students will review requirements and application processes for a variety of careers including medical, dental, physician assistant, veterinary, as well as the many allied health programs. Additional topics covered include study of the variety of healthcare professions, avenues of application, professionalism, personal statements, and developing an academic plan.  This is a seminar course with speakers and discussion format.

A course that delves into the role of women in science throughout history. Students will examine relationships of women to society in general and to science as it evolved through changing societies. The lives of an assortment of women who contributed to scientific advance will be examined. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: any laboratory science.

Recent advances in biology and medicine are creating many new and complex social issues and conflicts.  Developing a community of concerned responsibility to resolve these issues requires an understanding of the underlying biological principles involved and of the various potential solutions.  Through a series of selected topics Biology and Society will present the pertinent basic biological concepts and will foster discussion of values and issues involved in making personal decisions about each topic. Prerequisite: any lab science course.

This course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, systematics, and ecology of land plants as well as fungi and algae. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151. Corequisite: BIO-241.

An interdisciplinary field biology course with focus on tropical ecosystems, natural history, and conservation.  The ecological complexity of the tropics, the patterns of species diversity and the types of species interactions that characterize these systems are discussed, as well as how these ecological processes are affected by human activities.  The approach is experiential with emphasis on developing scientific skills of observations, analysis, and critical thinking, and applying them to field research.  Study abroad course.  Prerequisites:  BIO-110 and BIO-151; or other Lab Science upon permission by instructor.

A comparative phylogenetic study of protozoans and animalians.  For each taxon structural and functional consideration will be given to the systems of maintenance, activity, and continuity. The course will also emphasize the ecology, behavior, and evolution of each group. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151.  Corequisite: BIO-242.  Three lecture hours per week.

Application of scientific principles to the study, conservation and management of the environment with emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving used to study this broad field. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-265.

Laboratory study of plants to illustrate and supplement lecture material presented in BIO-211. Laboratory exercises will deal with life cycles and morphology of the major groups of the plant kingdom, anatomy and morphology of higher plants, and experiments in plant physiology.  Three laboratory or field trip hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151. Corequisite: BIO-211.

Laboratory studies include specific reference to classification, structure, function, ecology and phylogeny of the major animalians.  Special emphasis is placed on the observation of living animals.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151.  Corequisite: BIO-222.

The fundamental unit of life is the cell; therefore, cell biology forms the base upon which all modern biology and medicine is built. This course provides advanced study of microscopy and associated techniques such as freeze-fracture, fractionation, centrifugation, immunofluorescence, and cell fusion.  Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells will be covered but the course will emphasize eukaryotic cells. Topics covered will include:  cell chemistry, bioenergetics, enzymes, membranes, transport across membranes, endomembrane system, cell junctions, respiration, photosynthesis, cell cycle, cell division, information flow, gene regulation and expression, cytoskeleton, motility, contractility, signal transduction, cellular aspects of the immune response, and the cellular aspects of cancer. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141.

A study of the emergence and history of life on earth.  Emphasis is put on the mechanisms that result in evolutionary change at the cellular, population, and ecosystem level.  Areas covered include genetics, population ecology, speciation, and extinction. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.

The microscope and microscopy [techniques] are central to the development and practice of modern biology.  This course provides a historical outline of microscopy and a review of its modern techniques.  Topics included are phase-contrast, interference, fluorescence, confocal, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. One practicum hour per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.

A presentation of current methods in plant tissue culture.  Discussion and research experiments to develop understanding and expertise in such areas as:  sterile technique, plant propagation, nutritional effects, isolation and fusion of protoplasts, and other current plant tissue culture techniques.  Three practicum hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.

A course presenting many of the central principles of pharmacology and the mechanisms of drug action on biological systems.  Areas of study include drug development, dose-response relationships, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites BIO 110/151, CHE 111/141

Students will apply biological, chemical, and geological techniques to investigate environmental processes and how these processes are impacted by humans.  Class time will be spent in the laboratory and field. One three-hour lab meeting per week.  Co-requisite: BIO 225

A research development and seminar course in which freshman and sophomore level students will be introduced to processes and mechanisms for conducting original laboratory, field, or library based research.  Students are required to present their findings orally and in written form.  May be repeated for credit for a maximum of four semester hours. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.

This course is an introductory course in biostatistics, with a strong emphasis on statistical applications in public health and environmental research. This course will provide students with statistical tools for the analysis and presentation of data, and will stress interpretation of statistical results from health science literature. Course topics will include: sampling and study design, graphical presentation of data, simple hypothesis testing, repeated measures analysis, and regression modeling. Students will develop analytical computing and data presentation skills using the statistical package ‘R’. Also offered as PHS-301. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151 and MAT-175 or MAT-248.

Medical Ethics will introduce students to a variety of ethical and moral issues facing medicine and health care providers today. Through the use of lecture and activities/discussions based on sound biological/scientific principles, students will be able to: articulate an ethical issue, assemble necessary science-based information for making ethical decisions in a biological context, identify possible courses of medically-appropriate action and develop a morally and medically acceptable solution by synthesizing science-based information. Prerequisite: BIO 110/151

This course is designed to give students exposure to the fundamental concepts of human immunology. Course topics include the history of the discipline, innate and adaptive immunity, antigen recognition, B-cell and T-cell maturation and selection, the complement cascade response and control and manipulation of the immune system. Special topics on human immune diseases, including autoimmunity and immunodeficiency, will be discussed.  Additionally, the course will explore practical applications of immunology in laboratory, diagnostic and public health settings. Prerequisites: BIO 110/151, BIO 251, CHE 111/141, CHE 112/142

A combined lecture-laboratory course.  The microanatomy of mammalian tissues and organs at both the light and electron microscope level are surveyed.  Histology by its nature is highly visual, therefore, lecture and laboratory work will be integrated into a unified format. Students are introduced to the basics of microscopy and microtechnique, and are responsible for tissue and organ recognition and critical interpretation. Students are given a comprehensive set of prepared slides for detailed study. Three lecture-laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242.

A combined lecture-laboratory course.  This course is a comprehensive investigation of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites with special emphasis to those of medical and veterinary importance.  The techniques of parasitology are covered including egg sedimentation, life cycle studies, animal necropsy, and the use of taxonomic keys. Students are given a comprehensive set of prepared slides for detailed study. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242.

A course in the comparative morphology of protochordates and vertebrates.  The sequence of study includes protochordate origin, vertebrate origin, vertebrate diversity, early embryology, and the comparative morphology of vertebrate organ systems.  The evolutionary and developmental history of vertebrates will be of major importance. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242. Corequisite: BIO-345.

Study of the structure and function of the major tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body.  Three lectures per week. Corequisite course: BIO-342. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348, BIO-322/342.

A comprehensive study of the principal processes involved in vertebrate cells, tissues, and organ systems, including circulation, respiration, excretion, acid-base and fluid balances, digestion, reproduction, and muscle-nerve coordination and integration.  Anatomy is studied as necessary to understand the functions of the different systems.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite: BIO-343. 

A study of the interactions between plants and animals and their environments.  The effects of environmental factors on living systems are considered at the individual, population, and community levels.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, (MAT-181 or MAT-191).  Corequisite BIO-346.

A course designed to provide a general understanding of the structure and function of bacterial cell types along with the application of bacteriology to certain medical, food, environmental and industrial processes.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-251, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite: BIO-344.

A lecture course on the functional anatomy of human cells and tissues, organization of the body, the integument, the skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sensory structures. The perspective of the course is on the relationship between structure and function, homeostasis and diseases as a result of homeostatic imbalances. Three lectures per week. Corequisites: BIO-348. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348 or BIO-322/342.

A lecture course on the functional anatomy of the endocrine system, reproductive system, digestive system, respiratory system, circulatory system and excretory system, including fluid and electrolyte balance and acid-base balance. The perspective of the course is on the relationship between structure and function, homeostasis and diseases as a result of homeostatic imbalances. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: BIO-338, BIO-348. Corequisite: BIO-349

Students examine the structures of the human body by use of models, charts, and dissection of preserved and fresh animal organs.  Also, experiments are used to demonstrate functional aspects of the major organ systems.  Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-322. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348, BIO-322/342.

Includes experimentation in cellular physiology, blood analysis and circulation, respiration, excretion, and neuromuscular function.  Some dissection of preserved and fresh animal organs is required as necessary to understand organ functions.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite: BIO-323.

A series of laboratory exercises chosen to acquaint students with procedures used in studying bacteria, including aseptic technique, culturing methods and staining techniques.  Students isolate strains from natural habitats and also carry out exercises associated with food and medical microbiology.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-251, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142. Corequisite BIO-334.

A vertebrate dissection course.  A comparative systems approach is used in the detailed dissection of the lamprey, dogfish shark, mudpuppy, and cat.  The course also includes the microscopic and gross examination of hemichordates and protochordates.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-222, BIO-242. Corequisite: BIO-321.

Laboratory studies of ecosystems to supplement lecture material presented in BIO-326 and illustrate some techniques involved in current ecological studies.  Laboratory exercises will combine studies of plant, animal, and environmental interactions with experimental manipulations of selected ecosystems.  Three laboratory or field trip hours per week. Prerequisites:  BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, (MAT-181 or MAT-191). Corequisite BIO-326.

Students examine the functional anatomy of cells and tissues with light microscopy, the integument, the skeletal system, histology and development of bone, histology and anatomy of muscle, articulations and body movement, functional organization, anatomy and histology of the nervous system and sensory structure including integument, nose, tongue, ear and eye. Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: BIO-308. Students can only receive credit for one of the following: BIO-338/348, BIO-322/342.

Students examine the functional organization, anatomy and histology of the endocrine system, reproductive system, digestive system, respiratory system, circulatory system and urinary system, including taking physiological recordings from several systems and interpreting the recordings. Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-338, BIO-348. Corequisite: BIO-339.

This course provides experience in the techniques required for research in the aquatic environment. Aspects of organism identification, habitat classification, water chemistry, and sampling techniques will be included.  One three-hour field meeting per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142, MAT-175 or MAT-248.

This course provides experience in the techniques required for research in the terrestrial environment.  Aspects of organism identification, community classification, soil study, and sampling techniques will be included.  One four-hour field meeting per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142, MAT-175 or  MAT-248.

An upper level seminar course that focuses on one of the major modern biological themes. One seminar hour per week. Prerequisite courses: Completion of 16 hours in the sciences.

The course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory and use of the techniques of scanning electron microscopy. The course is for students from a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to biology, chemistry, art, and human environmental science. Topics include history of SEM, electron optics (gun, lenses, probes, current), electron beam interactions (scattering and volume), image processing and optimization, critical point drying, and sputter coating. Designed as an instrumentation course it is necessary that students gain hands-on knowledge  of the SEM by completing a project. Each student will prepare a poster of her project results for presentation on the Celebrating Student Achievement Day. Three hours of instruction per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, or BIO-105/145. Junior or Senior status required. Enrollment must be limited to 10 students.

A course designed to provide an understanding of the principles of classical, population, and molecular genetics and the relationship of these principles to human heredity, agriculture, evolution, and selected environmental problems. BIO-461 is a corequisite for Biology majors. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151.

A study of the chemistry of biological systems including metabolic interrelationships, reaction rates, control mechanisms, and integration of these reactions within the structural framework of the cell. Also offered as CHE-436. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241. 

The second part of a 2-part course in Biochemistry, this advanced course is designed to prepare students for graduate study and careers in the fields of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. The course will present topics in modern Biochemistry including bio-molecular structure, enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, biosynthesis of bio-molecules, and culminate with a discussion of special topics such as cellular signal transduction. Three lectures per week. Also offered as CHE-438.
Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241, CHE-222/242, BIO/CHE-436.

A collection of laboratory exercises designed to provide practical exposure to some of the general principles and methodology of biochemistry. Techniques include photometry, polarimetry, electrophoresis, centrifugation, and various chromatographic techniques. Also offered as CHE-446. Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151,
BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241. Corequisite: BIO/CHE-436.

This course will cover the basic techniques used in molecular biology and biotechnology. The course has both lecture and laboratory components in which fundamental concepts and techniques will be presented and then practiced. The laboratory skill introduced in this class would be useful for students interested in pursuing graduate studies or employment in research laboratories, and those interested in environmental or health issues. Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151, BIO-251, CHE-111, CHE-141, CHE-112, CHE-142.

Collection of laboratory exercises designed to provide practical exposure to some of the general principles considered in BIO-431. Laboratory work will be based upon a number of organisms including bacteria,  fungi, higher plants, fruit flies, and man. Three laboratory hours per week.  Prerequisites: BIO-110, BIO-151. Corequisite: BIO-431.

A Pre-Health Post-Baccalaureate seminar course in which students will conduct literature research on current health issues facing society.  Students will present their findings in both an oral and written format. Prerequisite: enrolled in Pre-health Post-baccalaureate Certificate Program

This is a research and seminar course in which junior or senior level students who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs conduct original laboratory, field, or library based research.  Students are required to present their research orally and in written form. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as expectations of the biology faculty. Prerequisite: BIO-299 or permission of instructor.

Senior research is a research and seminar course in which junior and senior level students conduct original laboratory, field, or library based research. Students are required to present their research orally and in written form. Prerequisite: BIO-299 or permission of instructor.

Fundamental concepts of chemistry, emphasizing stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, and chemical bonding.  Three class hours per week.  High school chemistry or  CHE-100 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course. Corequisites: CHE-141. Students must pass CHE-111 with a C or better in order for it to fulfill the prerequisite requirement for CHE-112.

A continuation of fundamental concepts with emphasis on kinetics, equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, and descriptive chemistry. Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: CHE-111 with a grade of C or better, CHE-141. Corequisite: CHE-142.  Students must pass CHE-112 with a C or better in order to fulfill the prerequisite requirement for other courses in the department.

Laboratory experiments designed to supplement the work in CHE-111. Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: CHE-111.

Laboratory experiments designed to supplement the work in CHE-112 including qualitative and quantitative analysis.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-111/141. Corequisite: CHE-112.

This course will provide exposure to professions related to the life sciences, physical sciences and environmental sustainability. Using student identified Strengths from StrengthsQuest, students will develop the professional skill sets to start a career path in various science and sustainability fields. Employment opportunities at all levels (technician, field specialist, human resources, sales, marketing, education, writing, advocacy, management, coordinator, etc.) in nonprofit, government, academic, and private sector industries will be discussed.  Also offered as BIO-201.

Essential principles, reaction mechanisms,  structures and stereochemistry of carbon compounds.  Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-111 with a grade of C or better, CHE-141, CHE-112 with a grade of C or better, CHE-142.  Corequisite: CHE-241.

A continuation of CHE-221, emphasizing reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and physical methods of structure determination. Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-221/241. Corequisite: CHE-242.

This course will study the sources, reactions, transport, and effects of chemical species in the atmosphere, soil, and water. The major 76 anthropogenic pollutants and their effects on the environment will also be studied. Prerequisites: CHE 111/141 with a grade of C or better.

Experimental techniques in synthesis and reactions of organic compounds.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-111/112, CHE-112/142. Corequisite: CHE-221.

Experimental organic chemistry with emphasis on qualitative analysis of organic compounds using chemical tests and instrumental analysis. Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: CHE-222.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original laboratory research. Students will submit their findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to spend two to three hours per week in the laboratory and one to two hours per week outside the laboratory for each semester hour credit. CHE-111 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course.  Course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of three semester hours. Also offered as PHY-299 and GEO-299.

A study of the principles and techniques of chemical analysis including volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and electroanalytic methods.  Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: CHE-112 with a grade of C or better.

Instrumental analysis covers the theory and methods for the separation, identification and quantitation of chemical species known as analytes in chemical samples. Students will explore the basic tools and language of analytical chemistry and the current trends in analytical instrumentation. The theory and application of spectrophotometric, chromatographic and other instrumental techniques will be explored with an emphasis placed on sample preparation. Students taking the course will be challenged to identify and quantify unknown analytes present in a sample. The course includes three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-112 and CHE-221.

Special topics in chemistry such as instrumental analysis, advanced organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, industrial chemistry, or chemometrics. Instructor's consent required.

A study of the states of matter, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, and reaction rates.  Three lectures per week.  Prerequisites: CHE-112 with a grade of C or better, MAT-181 or MAT-191 with a grade of C or better, and PHY-207 or PHY 211.

A study of the modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, and spectroscopy. Also offered as PHY-430. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHE-112 with a grade of C or better, MAT-212 with a grade of C or better, and PHY-208 or PHY 212.

A study of the chemistry of biological systems including metabolic interrelationships, reaction rates, control mechanisms, and integration of these reactions within the structural framework of the cell.  Also offered as BIO-436.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241.

The second part of a 2-part course in Biochemistry, this advanced course is designed to prepare students for graduate study and careers in the fields of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. The course will present topics in modern Biochemistry including bio-molecular structure, enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, biosynthesis of bio-molecules, and culminate with a discussion of special topics such as cellular signal transduction. Three lectures per week. Also offered as BIO-438. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE- 112/142, CHE-221/241, CHE-222/242, -BIO/CHE-436.

Laboratory experiments in thermochemistry, equilibria, and kinetics with emphasis on mathematical treatment of data and technical report writing. Corequisite: CHE-420.

Laboratory experiments to accompany the theoretical studies of atomic and molecular structure, and chemical bonding and spectroscopy in CHE-430. Corequisite: CHE-430.

A collection of laboratory exercises designed to provide practical exposure to some of the general principles and methodology of biochemistry. Techniques include photometry, polarimetry, electrophoresis, centrifugation, and various chromatographic techniques.  Also offered as  BIO-446.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241. 
Corequisite: CHE-437.
 

A study of advanced concepts of theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry with relevant biochemical examples.  CHE-222 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course. Prerequisites: CHE-221/241.

This course consolidates the knowledge of chemistry acquired through coursework and provides a bridge to students' post-graduation experience. Students will explore current trends in the field through discussion with peers, written assignments, and oral presentations. Familiarity with chemical research literature and real-world applications of chemistry will be a major focus of the course. Performance will be evaluated based on quality of participation, assignments, and one major presentation. Through reading and discussion, students will not only learn of potential career applications of the Meredith experience, but also prepare to effectively communicate in the professional arena. May be taken for credit more than one semester.

Open to senior chemistry majors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the chemistry faculty. Prerequisite: CHE-299 or instructor approval.

Open to junior and senior chemistry majors or others by permission.  In conjunction with a  faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A  research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of three semester hours. Prerequisite: CHE-299 or instructor approval.

Discussion of the ethical and legal issues created by the introduction of information technology into everyday life. Codes of ethics for computer users. Topics may include, but are not limited to, information ownership, individual privacy, computer crime, communications and freedom of expression, encryption and security. 

Introduction to and development of skills in the creation and use of spreadsheets. The student will also learn how to set up and create graphs from spreadsheets and to create macros. Extensive use of microcomputer software such as Excel.

This course is a continuation of CS-120. Students will learn how to use Excel as a practical business tool with in-depth use of formulas and functions and efficient worksheet and workbook design. Some topics in Excel databases and the creation of simple macros will also be covered. Prerequisite: CS-120 or competency in spreadsheets.

Creating a database structure, entering and updating data, generating reports based on querying the database. This course includes a project. Hands-on use of software such as MS Access.

This course requires extensive use of an HTML editor and a web design package to create web pages and web sites. Students will also learn site planning management. This will include learning to plan web sites and planning and assessing visitor involvement. Specific topics and techniques include: tables, frames, forms, cascading style sheets, use of animation and sound, and image creation and manipulation. Additional topics will include dynamic content, JavaScript, XML, file management, file transfer protocol and web site evaluation.

A course in programming in the high-level programming language of SAS which is used extensively in business, government, and education. By the end of the course the student will be able to immediately apply her skills in real-life programming solutions. Applications in data gathering and manipulation, report generation, and elementary statistical procedures. No previous programming experience is required. Prerequisite: computer literacy. Prior experience in statistics is recommended.

Students learn how a computer works and how to make it work as they design, code, debug and document programs to perform a variety of tasks. This course is intended for students who have not programmed a computer before, but may also serve as an introduction to Java (or other language) even if the student DOES know some programming. 

A continuation of programming concepts with an emphasis on object-oriented fundamentals (abstractions, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism) and more advanced programming projects. Industry best practices will be discussed. Prerequisite: CS-190 with a grade of C or better.

This course focuses on the server side of client server programming for the Web, especially database programming. There will be a study of fundamentals of databases including normalization and security, and students will apply this knowledge to real web database applications. Current tools: JavaScript (prerequisite), PHP  (a programming language), SQL (Structured Query Language). Prerequisites: CS-140, CS-156, and CS-190 with a grade of C or better. .

An introduction to programming in Visual Basic. Emphasis will be placed on the event-driven, graphical nature of Visual Basic, as opposed to procedure-oriented programming. Topics include form layout, event-driven Windows programming concepts, variables and data types, objects and properties, control structures, file management, accessing databases, linking applications, Web page development from a Visual Basic application, and developing and using ActiveX controls. This course is intended for those with programming experience. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor's consent. Prerequisite: CS-190.

An introduction to various topics chosen from combinatorics, propositional logic and graph theory. Topics include counting techniques, permutations and combinations, induction and recursion, Boolean algebra, planarity, minimal paths and minimum spanning trees. Recommended for middle grades and secondary mathematics licensure students. Also offered as MAT-262. 

This course will provide opportunities for freshman and sophomores to participate in original research in computer science. Students will submit findings in a formal written report and/or will give a presentation. Students will be expected to work approximately three hours per week on the research project for each semester hour of credit. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.

Topics include the sequential and linked allocation of lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Students gain maturity by writing complex algorithms and through studying run time analysis and program integrity. Prerequisite: CS-212 with a grade of C or better.

The fundamentals of logic design, the organization and structuring of the major hardware components of computers. Prerequisite: CS-190 with a grade of C or better.

The main theme of the course is solving problems and creating opportunities with technology in an organizational setting. Topics include how information systems affect and are affected by organizational goals and strategies; basic overviews of the components of an information system; hardware, software, data storage and retrieval, and network communications; the Internet; the information systems development process; and systems development as planned organizational change. Prerequisite: Completion of the General Education fundamental computer skills competency requirement.

In the ever shifting and related fields of operating systems and networking, this course teaches the fundamental aspects of computing systems including security, memory management, job scheduling, synchronization, client-server programming and distributed programming. There will also be significant hands-on application of principles in the lab. Prerequisites: CS-212 with a grade of C or better.

This course is about visualizing models on the computer screen, including 2D and 3D images, perspective, shading, animation and stereo. The course will use and study numerical models of such interesting phenomena as geometric objects, fractals, trajectories and propagation of waves. Prerequisites: CS-212 with a grade of C or better.

A computer-oriented study of analytical methods in mathematics. Topics include solving non-linear equations, least squares approximation, interpolating polynomials, numerical differentiation, and numerical quadrature. Also offered as MAT-360. Prerequisites: CS-190 and MAT-212.

Introduction to the principles of design, coding,  and testing of software projects; the software development cycle; and managing the implementation of large computer projects. Students undertake a large team project. Prerequisites: CS-230 and CS-301.

A seminar course for computer science majors. Students will research and present current developments and topics in computer science. Post-graduation opportunities will be explored and preparation for these opportunities will be discussed. Course open to juniors and seniors only. Prerequisites: 12 credits from CS.

Topics of current interest in computer science not covered in other courses. Prerequisites vary with topic studied.

Supervised experience in business, governmental, or non-profit institutions where work is related to student interest in computer science.  Limited to Computer Science majors with a minimum GPA of 2.00 in the major and 12 hours in computer science.  Can be repeated for a total of 3 credit hours.  Pass/fail grading only.  Instructor consent required.

With a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The research project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the computer science faculty. Enrollment limited to seniors or second semester juniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.

With a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and/or a presentation. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in Computer Studies or others with permission of the department. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six hours.

A general introduction to data analysis that covers a broad selection of methodologies for working with data.  Topics will be chosen from sources of data, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, cleaning and preparing data, inference, and regression.  Students will use statistical analysis technology.  Particular topics related to analyzing data, such as ethics and communication of results, are highlighted.  Prerequisites: MAT-175 or MAT-248.

Implementation of principles and techniques of data science, including advanced programming projects.  Topics will be chosen from data visualization, data wrangling and cleaning, regression, classification, and clustering.  Industry best practices, such as ethical decision-making and communication of results, will be discussed.  Prerequisites: DS-200 and CS-190.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original research in data science.  Students will submit findings in a written report and/or will give a presentation.  Students will be expected to work approximately three hours per week on the research project for each semester hour of credit.  May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.

Topics chosen from current topics in data science.  Prerequisites vary with the topics studied.  May be repeated for credit.

With a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project in data science that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  The research project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the faculty mentor.  Enrollment limited to seniors or second semester juniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs who are minoring in Data Science.

With a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original data science research project that will culminate in a paper and/or a presentation.  Open to juniors and seniors minoring in Data Science or others with permission of the department.  May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six hours.

A research development for freshmen and sophomore students majoring in Environmental Sustainability.  This course will expose students to research methodologies and opportunities to conduct original research in their area of concentration for the major using laboratory, library, or other discipline specific methodologies.  Students will be required to produce written and oral reports on their research.  May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.

This is a research course in which junior and senior level students who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows programs conduct original research.  Students are required to present their work in written and oral form.  The project must meet Honor Program thesis requirements as well as expectations of the sponsoring faculty.

Senior research is a research course in which junior and senior level students conduct original research in their area of concentration for the major.  Students will employ the methodologies of the area of concentration, either laboratory, field, literature or other methodologies.  Students are required to present their research in written and oral form.  It is recommended that students take EVS-299 prior to enrolling in EVS 499.  Course may be repeated for up to 6 credit yours.

An introduction to the atmospheric, hydrologic, and geologic processes by which the physical environment of our planet is continuously reshaped and reformed.  With corequisite lab counts as a laboratory science for general education requirements. Corequisite: GEO-240.

This course provides students with the experience of finding and analyzing a variety of geographically referenced data, and then presenting them in graphical and statistical formats in order to answer research questions from everyday life.  This process will include spatial reasoning, problem definition, and appropriate applications for planning and decision-making.

A systematic survey of major world regions with emphasis on climates, land forms, resources and economics.  Also includes discussions on political ties and position in world trade. Counts as a social science elective for general education requirements.

An introduction to the nature, origin,  processes and dynamics of the atmosphere that result in weather variability and climate change and their impact on human activity. Knowledge of algebra required, but a calculator is not required. Prerequisites: One laboratory science course (BIO-110/151, CHE-111/141, GEO-200/240, or PHY-211/241).

Field and laboratory exercises involving the atmospheric, hydrologic, and geologic processes by which the physical environment of our planet is continuously reshaped and reformed. One full-day field trip is required. A lab fee covers the field trip cost. With corequisite course counts as a laboratory science for general education requirements. Corequisite: GE0-200.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original laboratory research. Students will submit their findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to spend two to three hours per week in the laboratory and one to two hours per week outside the laboratory for each semester hour credit. GEO-200 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course. May be repeated for a total of three credit hours.  Also offered as CHE-299 and PHY-299.

This course is an introduction to the inter-relationships among the physical, chemical, and biological processes and the large variety of resources of the physical world. Consequences from natural phenomena and, increasingly, human activities that use various resources, give rise to a number of environmental problems.  Potential solutions to these problems will be discussed. Prerequisites: CHE-111/141 or GEO-200/240.

Open to students in the department of Chemistry, Geoscience and Physics who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. In conjunction with a faculty mentor,  the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the students and the faculty mentor are required to complete registration. The project must meet the Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the departmental faculty. Prerequisite: GEO-200/240 or GEO-203.

Open to junior and senior geoscience minors or others by permission. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of three semester hours. Prerequisite: GEO-200.

This course is designed as a preparation for college algebra and other 100-level mathematics courses covering the following topics: the real number system, exponents, roots, radicals, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations and inequalities, graphing quadratic equations, and word problems. Counts as two credit hours toward course load and full-time student status but does not count as college credit.

This course emphasizes reasoning and communicating to clarify and refine thinking in practical areas of life. Students will gain confidence in their ability to apply their mathematical skills to applied problems and decision making. Topics will be chosen from: set theory, probability, financial mathematics, visual representation of information, geometry, voting methods and graph theory.

For prospective elementary teachers. Introduction to mathematical concepts, their understanding and communication. Topics include an introduction to problem solving, set operations and their application to arithmetic, numeration systems, arithmetic, and measurement. Emphasis is on developing a deep understanding of the fundamental ideas of elementary school mathematics. Does not apply towards the math/science general education requirement for graduation.
 

This class is intended for students who are preparing to take calculus. Trigonometry will be defined using the unit circle approach, with emphasis on the geometry of the circle. Classical right triangle trigonometry will be studied, along with trigonometric identities and equations, the laws of sines and cosines, and graphs and properties of the trigonometric functions and their inverses. Additional topics from algebra will include logarithmic and exponential functions. A graphical approach will be utilized throughout, with an emphasis on solving application problems. Students will develop skills in basic trigonometry and its applications, with an emphasis on modeling with functions and other algebraic skills necessary for the study of calculus. Not open to students who have credit for MAT-180 or MAT-191.

A general introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, designed for non-mathematics majors.  Topics include elementary probability, distributions, estimation of population parameters, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Students will use statistical analysis technology. This course is not recommended for mathematics majors.
 

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence that integrates Precalculus and Calculus I topics. The course includes the study of the geometric and analytic properties of algebraic and transcendental functions. The course will examine limits, continuity, and derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions.  Applications of differentiation include motion and related rates. Credit not given for both MAT-180 and MAT-191. Prerequisite:MAT-170 or placement.

This course is the second of a two-semester sequence that integrates Precalculus and Calculus I topics. The course continues the study of the geometric and analytic properties of algebraic and transcendental functions. The course will explore applications for differentiation including optimization and graphical analysis of functions, as well as the theory of integration and basic integration techniques. Applications of integration include area. Credit not given for both MAT-181 and MAT-191.  Prerequisite: MAT-180.

A study of functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, and the integral. Applications of differentiation and integration include maxima, minima, marginal cost and revenue, rectilinear motion, and areas. Students will use technology for exploration and problem solving. May be taken without prerequisite courses with department's permission. Credit not given for both MAT-180 and MAT-191 or for both MAT-181 and MAT-191. Prerequisite: MAT-170 or placement. 
 

A continuation of the calculus of functions of one variable. Topics include volumes of rotation, transcendental functions, integration techniques, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and infinite series. Students will use technology for exploration and problem solving. May be taken without prerequisite with department's permission. Prerequisite: MAT-181 or MAT-191.
 

A study of vectors in two and three dimensions, vector algebra, vector functions, vector calculus and multivariable calculus. This includes three-dimensional analytic geometry, partial differentiation and multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, Green's Theorem, Divergence Theorem, Stokes's Theorem and applications. Students will use technology for exploration and problem solving. May be taken without prerequisite with department's permission. Prerequisite: MAT-212.
 

A study of vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, and their applications. Students will use technology for exploration and problem solving.  Prerequisite: MAT-181 or MAT-191.

An introduction to statistics for mathematically inclined students, focusing on the process of statistical investigations. Observational studies, controlled experiments, sampling, randomization, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, significance tests, confidence intervals, one-and two sample inference procedures, linear regression. Statistical software will be used throughout the course. Credit in this course is not given to students who already have credit for MAT-175. Prerequisite: MAT-181 or MAT-191.
 

This course is a study of logic and an introduction to various techniques of mathematical proof, including direct proof, indirect proof, and proof by induction. Students will be involved actively in the construction and exposition of proofs from multiple representations – visually, numerically, symbolically – and will present their reasoning in both oral and written form.  Topics covered include sets and basic properties of the integers, rational numbers, and real numbers. Throughout the course, students will explore strategies of problem-solving and active mathematical investigation.  After completing this course, a student would have an appropriate background for upper-level theoretical mathematics courses.  Prerequisite: MAT-212, or Corequisite: MAT-212 with permission of the instructor.
 

The second course intended for prospective elementary teachers continues an in-depth introduction to mathematical concepts focusing on student understanding and communication. Topics include geometric concepts (shape and space, area and volume, transformations and symmetry), algebraic concepts (patterns, equations, and functions), and statistical concepts (designing investigations, gathering & analyzing data, and basic probability). The course will utilize investigative activities and instructional technology. Emphasis is on developing a deep understanding of the fundamental ideas of elementary school mathematics and transitioning from inductive to deductive reasoning. Does not apply toward the math/science general education requirement for graduation. Prerequisites: MAT-160 and (MAT-175 or MAT-181 or MAT-191). Does not apply toward the mathematics major or mathematics minor.
 

An introduction to various topics chosen from combinatorics, propositional logic and graph theory. Topics include counting techniques, permutations and combinations, induction and recursion, Boolean algebra, planarity, minimal paths and minimum spanning trees.  Recommended for middle grades and secondary mathematics licensure students.  Also offered as CS-262.  

Students work in teams to explore via computer various mathematical concepts. The experiment-conjecture-proof technique allows students to experience some of the excitement of discovering mathematics. During the lab period, the teams interact in a cooperative setting and discuss the meaning of what they are learning. All of the labs contain dynamical graphical displays which enhance the students' understanding of the topics studied. At the end of each experiment, students submit a written report describing their findings. Prerequisites or Corequisites: MAT-181, MAT-191, MAT-212 or MAT-213.
 

This course is a seminar intended for students interested in a major in mathematics. Students will be exposed to various areas of mathematics as well as a brief history of mathematics; students will give short presentations about these topics. Co-curricular opportunities as well as career and graduate school opportunities will be discussed. Students will create materials such as cover letters and resumes. Prerequisites: MAT-212 and sophomore standing

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original research in mathematics. Students will submit findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to work approximately three hours per week on the research project for each semester hour of credit. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.
 

A course emphasizing Euclidean geometry and introducing hyperbolic, elliptic, and transformational geometries. Students will use methods of discovery, construction, and proof to study geometric systems. Prerequisite: MAT-250.
 

The study of probability and statistical inference. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical development of probability distributions, discrete, continuous, and multivariate, and the sampling distributions used in statistical inference.  Prerequisites: MAT-212 and either MAT-175 or MAT-248.
 

A continuation of introductory statistics which includes one- and two-sample inference, two-way tables, simple and multiple regression, and analysis of variance. Applications of these topics will be drawn from business, the social and natural sciences, and other areas. Students will use statistical analysis technology. Prerequisite: MAT-175 or MAT-248.

A study of distribution-free statistical methods. Estimation and hypothesis testing procedures that make relatively mild assumptions about the form of population distribution. Analysis of qualitative (nominal level) and rank (ordinal level) data. Inference for proportions, one- and two-sample location, dispersion, trend, one- and two-way layouts, rank correlation, and regression. Students will use statistical analysis technology. Prerequisite: MAT-175, MAT-248, or PSY-200.
 

A study of first order differential equations, linear differential equations of higher order, Laplace transforms, and applications. Students will use a computer package. Prerequisite: MAT-212.
 

A computer-oriented study of analytical methods in mathematics. Topics include solving non-linear equations, least squares approximation, interpolating polynomials, numerical differentiation, and numerical quadrature. Also offered as CS-360. Prerequisites: CS-190 and MAT-212.
 

A study of mathematical models used in the social and natural sciences and their role in explaining and predicting real world phenomena. The course will emphasize the development of the skills of model building and will address the use of various types of models, such as continuous, discrete, deterministic, and statistical models. Prerequisites: CS-190, MAT-213, and MAT-248.
 

A rigorous treatment of the foundations of calculus. A study of the algebraic and topological properties of the real numbers; one-variable calculus, including limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, and series of functions. Prerequisites: MAT-213 and MAT-250.
 

A study of general algebraic systems. Topics covered will include relations, mappings, groups, rings, and fields. Group theory is emphasized. Prerequisite: MAT-250

Topics chosen from mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. Prerequisites vary with the topics studied. May be repeated for credit.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The research project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the mathematics faculty. Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only. Second semester juniors may enroll with permission of the faculty mentor.
 

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and/or a presentation. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in mathematics and to others by permission of the department. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six credit hours.
 

Introduces licensure students to the philosophy and objectives of mathematics education. The course will focus on the content of school mathematics and examine closely both state and national recommended standards of school mathematics curricula. The emphasis of the course will be on developing a deep understanding of school mathematics and pedagogical content knowledge – the mathematical knowledge for  teaching. Technologies appropriate for conceptual understanding of mathematics will be introduced. A  related field component will be required at a local school site. This class is open to students applying to or accepted in the teacher licensure program; others by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: MAT-250.
 

A continuation of the study of the philosophy and objectives of mathematics education, emphasizing the methods and materials needed for teaching mathematics in the middle and secondary schools. The course will focus on the selection of worthwhile mathematical tasks, planning for instruction, and assessment of student learning. An emphasis will be placed on technology. Students must demonstrate their skills in planning, teaching, assessing, and making instructional decisions based on formative evidence. Field component will be required at the internship site. Instructor's consent required.
 

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in research in mathematics education. Students will submit findings in a formal written report and will give, if appropriate, a presentation. Students will be expected to work approximately three hours per week on the research project for each semester hour of credit. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.
 

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The research project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the mathematics faculty. Open to seniors in the Honors and Teaching Scholars Programs only; students must also be completing the licensure program. Second semester juniors may enroll with permission of the faculty mentor.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project that will culminate in a paper and/or a presentation. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in mathematics who are also completing the licensure program and to others by permission of the department. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six credit hours.

This is an introduction to the field of public health that educates students in the interdisciplinary field of public health. Students are introduced to concepts of epidemiology, public health tools of informatics and policy, social and behavioral aspects of public health, environmental and social determinants of morbidity and morality, healthcare and political systems, and health disparities. Through the use of case studies of current public health issues, students will examine scientific aspects of disease, effects of population behaviors, socioeconomic and cultural influences, health education, health policy and management on the overall health of diverse populations. 

This course is an introductory course in biostatistics, with a strong emphasis on statistical applications, in public health and environmental research. This course will provide students with statistical tools for the analysis and presentation of data, and will stress interpretation of statistical results from health science literature. Course topics will include: sampling and study design, graphical presentation of data, simple hypothesis testing, repeated
measures analysis, and regression modeling. Students will develop analytical computing and data presentation skills using the statistical package 'R'. Also offered as BIO-301. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151 and MAT-175 or MAT-248.

Epidemiology provides students with a quantitative methodology for assessment of risk in diverse populations. Relationships of disease and risk of disease in diverse populations is discussed with applications to case studies. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151 and PHS-101.

The internship is a culminating experience for the Public Health major. Public Health majors will work with community partners to engage in volunteer experiences that assist the community partner and provide students with exposure to issues in public health practice. Students will apply concepts learned in core courses to a project that will serve the community partner and demonstrate the student's understanding of the field of Public Health. Open to Public Health majors and minors only. Prerequisites: PHS-101, PHS/BIO-301, PHS-302.

A study for the non-science major of the fundamental principles of physical science with emphasis on their relevant applications. This course may not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements.

This course is designed to introduce students to the science of astronomy and its importance as an influence on our view of human-kind.  Topics include the history of astronomy, the motion of celestial objects, models of the solar system, comparative planetology, stars, and life in the universe. Conceptual comprehension of basic astronomy is reinforced through student-guided class discussions, group problem solving, and student presentation. A strong background in algebra is required for this course.  

This is a first semester introductory physics course. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, gravitation, momentum, and energy with emphasis on applications in the biomedical field. Prerequisite: a course in pre-calculus, including algebra and trigonometry, or equivalent. Corequisite: PHY-247.

This is the second half of a two-semester introductory physics sequence. Topics include fluids, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity, and magnetism with emphasis on application in the biomedical field. Prerequisites: PHY-207/247. Corequisite: PHY-248.

This is a first-semester calculus-based general physics course. Topics include mechanics, kinematics, vectors, forces, Newton's Laws of Motion, gravitation, work, energy, momentum, and conservation laws. Problem solving is an essential part of the course. Classroom engagement activities are used to enhance problem-solving skills and to guide students toward a coherent comprehension of physics. High school physics is strongly recommended as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: A C or better in MAT-181 or MAT-191. Corequisite: PHY-241.

This is the second half of a two-semester calculus-based general physics sequence. Topics include fluids, oscillatory motion, waves, sound, optics, electrostatics, electricity, and magnetism. Problem solving is an essential part of the course. Conceptual understanding is reinforced through interactive classroom activities, including group problem solving and discussion questions. Prerequisite: PHY 211 with a Grade of C or permission of instructor, PHY241. Corequisite: PHY-242.

This course involves experimental studies in mechanics, kinematics, gravitation, forces, momentum, and energy. The laboratory develops skills with basic sensors and measurement of physical quantities. Students work in small groups to record numerical data, assess measurement uncertainty, discuss concepts, and interpret results. Lab reports are assigned to help develop skills in scientific writing and communication. Corequisite:  PHY-211.

This course involves experimental studies in fluids, oscillatory motion, sound, basic electricity, electron charge, and optics. The laboratory develops skills with basic sensors and measurement of physical quantities. Students work in small groups to record numerical data, assess measurement uncertainty, discuss concepts, and interpret results. Lab reports are assigned to help develop skills in scientific writing and communication. Corequisite: PHY-212.

This course involves experimental studies in mechanics, kinematics, gravitation, forces, momentum, and energy. The laboratory develops skills of measurement of physical quantities. Students work in small groups to record numerical data, assess measurement uncertainty, discuss concepts, interpret results, and communicate results. Corequisite: PHY-207

This course involves experimental studies in fluids, oscillatory motion, sound, basic electricity, electron charge, and optics. The laboratory develops skills of measurement of physical quantities. Students work in small groups to record numerical data, assess measurement uncertainty, discuss concepts, interpret results, and communicate results. Corequisite: PHY 208

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original laboratory research. Students will submit their findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to spend two to three hours per week in the laboratory and one to two hours per week outside the laboratory for each semester hour credit. PHY-211 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite for this course. Course may be repeated for a total of three hours credit. Also offered as CHE-299 and GEO-299.

A study of the modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding and spectroscopy. Also offered as CHE-430. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHE-112/142, PHY-212/242, (MAT-181 or MAT-191).

Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the students and faculty mentor are required to complete registration. The project must meet the Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the departmental faculty. Prerequisite: PHY-212/242.

Open to junior and senior science or mathematics majors or others by permission. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of three semester hours. 

A course for students seeking teacher licensure in science [6-9] or comprehensive licensure in [9-12].  Students are introduced to the specific methods used in science teaching.  Both the theoretical and the practical aspects of teaching science in the middle and secondary schools are stressed. Information on safety practices is given. Emphasis is placed on the importance of demonstration and laboratory work in science classes, on effective use of technology, on understanding and making effective use of objectives, and on individualizing science instruction.

Contact Information
Liz Wolfinger
Dean, School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences; Professor of Biological Sciences
178 Science/Mathematics Bldg.
wolfingere@meredith.edu
(919) 760-2279