The history, philosophy, and practice of observing, documenting, and analyzing children's behavior within an ecological framework will be presented.  Specific observational techniques to assess adult-child and child-child interactions, assessment of play, and environmental assessment will be presented.  Students will develop an assessment portfolio for individual children. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, PSY-210 or PSY-310.

An examination of biological and environmental factors and their interactions as they impact the development of young children, and may interfere with typical growth and development. The effects of various risk factors, developmental delays or disabilities on patterns of development in the physical, cognitive, language, social-emotional, and adaptive domains will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on low-incidence disabilities. Field experiences required. Prerequisites: PSY-210, or PSY-310, PSY-312, CD-234. Prerequisite or corequisite: CD-340.

This seminar gives students the opportunity to investigate current professional literature and integrate content from multiple courses and field experiences focused on meeting a  wide variety of individual needs in early childhood environments. Student-led discussions will focus on applying principles of universal design, inclusion, and developmentally appropriate accommodations for children with disabilities and delays. Students will be introduced to Individualized Education Programs and will practice developing appropriate goals and objectives for children. Prerequisites: PSY-210 or  PSY-310, PSY-312, CD-234, CD-334. Prerequisite or corequisite: CD-340. Corequisite: BK-341.

This course focuses on the development of reading and writing processes from birth through kindergarten and how technology can be integrated across the curriculum. This course gives students a deeper understanding of the theory, research and recommended practices behind emergent literacy,  focusing on the development of reading and writing. Students will develop an initial electronic teaching portfolio and will conduct literacy and technology activities in inclusive preschool and kindergarten settings. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, BK-337 and CD-345.

This course will focus on the application of developmental theory to curriculum planning and developmentally appropriate practice; on linking assessment and curriculum planning; and on adapting and evaluating curriculum to promote the inclusion of young children of various developmental abilities. Students will examine the underlying theory related to the development of an integrated curriculum for young children and the various strategies that can be employed to develop a comprehensive curriculum.  Specific ideas and strategies for planning and implementation will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of practicum each week. Prerequisites: BK-337, CD-345.

Supervised clinical internship with infants and toddlers with and without disabilities under the direction of a cooperating teacher with faculty supervision. Full-time teaching assignments with weekly seminars. Course fee assessed. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, CD-345, BK-337, BK-341, BK-342. Corequisites: BK-465, CD-434.

This seminar will introduce students to the function of interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary teams and the primary disciplines involved in the delivery of services to young children and their families.  The role of the professional in assessment, planning, intervention, and case management will be examined as will the mechanisms whereby these services are coordinated, and the strategies for implementing interdisciplinary, and multi-disciplinary and transdisciplinary programs will be discussed. Issues related to ethics and professional conduct will be discussed. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, CD-345, CD-434, CD-438, BK-337, BK-341, BK-342. 

In this professional seminar, students will explore the role of teacher as leader and advocate by examining current research and recommended practice in BK teaching and leading. Topics will include professional learning communities,  Recognition and Response (Response to Intervention for early childhood), preventing overrepresentation of racially diverse students in  early intervention, working with children and families who are English language learners,  issues in BK curriculum, service-learning with young children, using digital technology, and career paths in birth-kindergarten. In  collaboration with the instructor,  cooperating teachers and principals, students will select readings, lead discussions and host the seminar one time each in their students teaching sites. In addition, students will construct and lead a service-learning project with their pupils, and will lead one professional discussion or activity with the faculty in their schools. Students will reflect on their teaching and leadership. Corequisite: EDU-490.

A study of the behavior and development of young children two through eight years of age. Students will participate in the care, guidance, and education of a group of young children in an early childhood classroom. Content includes major developmental theories and research applications. Students are to register for a separate off campus practicum (sections as 234L). Three hours of lecture and three hours of practicum each week.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and questions in Child Development. This course will provide an introduction to research methods in social science and child development. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: CD-234.

Children undergoing hospitalizations and medical treatment have unique developmental, emotional, social, and educational needs.  Child life specialists are trained members of health care teams who focus on addressing the needs of these children and the needs of their families.  This course will introduce students to topics that are central to child life profession, such as helping children and families cope with acute and chronic illness, preparing children for medical procedures, standards and ethics, and coping with grief and loss. It will also focus on how the use of therapeutic play can reduce the stress of hospitalization, and examine how illness can impact children’s development. Prerequisites: CD 234, PSY 210 or PSY 310 or by permission of instructor

This course will provide the theoretical foundations of infant-toddler development as students examine the current research relevant to the growth and development of very young children from a multidisciplinary perspective.  Students will participate concurrently in a field experience in a program serving infants and toddlers. Three hours of lecture and three hours of practica each week. Prerequisite: CD-234.

A functional course designed to help the students achieve an understanding of various family structures and interpersonal dynamics.  Students will examine theories of family structure, of family function, and of interpersonal and close relationships that can be applied to their personal and professional lives.

This course emphasizes strong teacher-child relationships as a foundation for child development in all domains.  Students will learn and practice positive interaction strategies to promote young children's development and learning. The course also focuses on how interactions with adults and peers and the structure and organization of indoor and outdoor environments influence the development and learning of children. Students will learn to support and facilitate children's play as the major context for development and learning, create inclusive indoor and outdoor environments, and meet diverse individual needs through sensitive interactions and environmental design.  Weekly field experiences required.  Prerequisite: CD-234.

Students will design and implement activities that integrate multiple developmental areas and levels of ability that are in accordance with the guidelines of developmentally appropriate practice. Placements will be in early education programs that provide services for children with and without disabilities. Instructor's consent required.  Course fee assessed. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, and BK-337.

This course will analyze the needs of families from a global perspective. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the family will be examined in various cultures, focusing on family structures, gender roles, socialization practices, health issues, and risk and resiliency factors. Major trends that affect families worldwide will be examined. 

Methods of developing, implementing, and evaluating curriculum experiences that are developmentally based for both infants and toddlers with and without disabilities, will be addressed. Program issues that relate to the needs of infants and toddlers and their families will be examined. Three hours of field experiences per week. Instructor's consent required. Course fee assessed. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, CD-345.

A study of administration and the role of leadership in programs serving young children. Primarily through project and portfolio work, students will demonstrate competency in understanding the role of developmental theory in establishing and developing programs; the practical needs of programs in terms of staffing,  financial management, licensing, environmental design, equipping and furnishing classrooms; working with parents and governing boards; and assessment and development of teaching staff. Health, safety, and nutritional concerns will also be addressed.  May be taken without prerequisite course with permission from the instructor. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340.

An overview of current information related to working with families of young children. Family and social systems theories and research provide a foundation for an ecological transactional view of families of diverse structural and sociocultural backgrounds. The emphasis of the course is on providing family-centered services that support and strengthen the family unit. Field experiences required.  Prerequisites:  CD-234, CD-334, and BK-337.

This course will trace the history and supporting theoretical bases of early education and early childhood special education in the United States. Models of early education and early intervention will be examined from a national perspective. Current trends and legislation at the state and national level will also be investigated. Program models designed to serve the needs of economically disadvantaged and at-risk children and families will be a focus of examination. Observations of programs that exemplify different models may be conducted during the semester. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340.

Supervised student teaching will provide an in-depth opportunity for students to plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction for young children.  Student teaching is co-supervised by a cooperating classroom teacher and a member of the Child Development faculty. In addition to 300 contact hours spent in the classroom, students will meet weekly to discuss, analyze, and evaluate their field experiences. Students need to have four consecutive days when they can participate in the classroom on a full-time basis.  Course fee assessed. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, BK-337, CD-340, CD-345, and BK-445.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the child development faculty.  A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration.  Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research project investigating topics and questions in Child Development.  This course will provide an introduction to research methods in social science and child development. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, BK-337.

Guide to freshmen teaching scholars for a successful first year in the college career. Includes strategies for making a successful transition to the academic and personal demands of life as a college student. Second semester includes focus on contemporary school issues and licensure areas preparing students for public school, community, campus and other activities.

This discussion-oriented course guides sophomore teaching scholars to the awareness of both societal and educational issues dealing with diversity. Also included is information about teaching in North Carolina public schools: admission to the teacher education program, the PRAXIS test and initial licensure programs for elementary and secondary programs.

For junior teaching scholars, this course includes educational issues dealing with leadership styles and characteristics. Students will experience and discuss leadership characteristics in the school community as they interact with assigned mentor teachers and other school personnel in their licensure fields. Integrated into this course is information about teaching in the North Carolina public schools, including
performance-based licensure.

Senior teaching scholars will build on the junior year experiences of establishing a professional relationship with the assigned classroom teacher mentors. Seminars involve a professional development series in which the student will gain a broader understanding of cultural concepts, tools of inquiry, and structure of the discipline taught through classroom activities and experiences.

Guide to freshmen teaching scholars for a successful first year in the college career. Includes strategies for making a successful transition to the academic and personal demands of life as a college student.  Students will also focus on contemporary school issues and licensure areas preparing students for public school, community, campus and other activities.

Using the tools of critical thinking and Nussbaum's capabilities approach (and others), students in this course will analyze professional educators' codes of ethics, their own autobiography of school experience, and current issues in education. Through observations in schools, students will get an introduction to some of the dilemmas of practice and policy in education.

Students will study the education system in Italy as well as the larger culture of Italy that informs the educational context.  Students will also discuss Montessori and vocational education as they relate to the more general approaches to schooling. This seminar will enable students to critically examine their assumptions regarding school and schooling, building upon previous coursework in EDU 232, 234, and methods classes. Through course readings, special trips, guest speakers, and travel to Sansepolcro, Italy students will see a different perspective on education. We will have school visits, meetings with teachers and families, and experiences within the city of Sansepolcro to help us understand education from this perspective. Course meetings prior to departure will also focus on preparation for the trip and all that we will experience in country.  Prerequisite: Admission to the Teaching Fellows Program and/or the Education Department.

This course provides undergraduates an introduction into the nature of the work of educators. A hybrid course, it focuses on the roles and responsibilities of educators in elementary, middle, and high school settings. Students will experience a series of informational and reflective activities related to teaching.

A study of public education from a cultural/historical foundations approach including an understanding of American educational goals. Focus is on history of education in the United States as well as current issues in education from multiple perspectives.  A small group semester-long project that involves the development of a plan to improve schooling is a major focus for this course. In addition, there are other specific off-campus observations and a tutoring assignment that require a considerable time commitment outside of class both during the day and the evening. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

This course is designed to involve students in the study of the psychological principles that affect how learning occurs and the classroom application of those principles to teaching.  Insight will be gained into the teaching/learning process by participating as observers in local schools for a minimum of 5 hours during the semester, as well as through a minimum of 5 hours working with small groups of children to extend their learning. Through these observations and small group experiences, students will develop a perspective into the teaching-learning process by exploring the role of the teacher, and studying the nature of the learner in the learning environment. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Foundations, vocabulary and concepts in dance, music, theatre and visual arts will be introduced to students through demonstration, practice and reflections. The value of the arts as a way of learning will be emphasized, as will oral and written communication skills.  Students will participate in experientially based learning laboratories in all four arts disciplines and apply these skills to the elementary school classroom. Co- or Pre-requisite: EDU-234.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original research in education.  Students will be expected to work approximately three hours per week on the research project for each semester hour of credit. Their work will culminate in a formal written report and/or an oral presentation. A “Research Course Information Form” completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration.

The “foundational” elementary mathematics methods course, the course focuses on the development–and continuous assessment–of primary grade students' mathematical thinking and understanding of number, operations, measurement, algebraic thinking, and geometry. It includes an introduction to mathematics education in the elementary school (theoretical foundations, critical issues, curriculum, communicating with parents, tools & strategies, and continuing professional development for teachers). Comparisons and connections are made between the development of early literacy and mathematics skills in children. Specific strategies for helping students with diverse learning needs (ELL, learning disabilities, academically gifted) extend their understanding of mathematics are included. Approximately eight hours of daytime focused field experiences (observations, teacher interview, student interviews, & individual tutoring) at a partner school in a K-2 classroom are required. Prerequisite: MAT-160 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: EDU-310. This course if for students completing a K-6 licensure.

Students will gain an awareness of current and emerging technologies for the classroom, and develop practical skills in using these technologies in the classroom. Recent developments in educational software, the Internet, and computers will provide students with an array of technologies for educational enrichment. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

This course will address the research, theory and instructional practices related to teaching literacy.  Specific attention will be paid to language acquisition (first and second language) and early literacy development.  Candidates will engage in culturally responsive teaching through a comprehensive, balanced literacy program that includes integrating early literacy strategies, a wide variety of multicultural texts, work analysis, vocabulary development, fluency, and comprehension support.  Candidates will learn how to conduct informal and formal literacy assessments in order to plan instruction.  Approximately eight hours of daytime focused field experiences (observations, teaching, assessments and individual tutoring) at a partner school are required.  Prerequisite: ENG-320. Corequisite: EDU-304. 

This course is an introduction to the field of teaching English as a second language and a comprehensive look at research, policies, and effective practices for students who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.  The course weaves the theories with the practice of second language education, second language acquisition, cultural diversity, content integration and assessment, literacy development, programs and policies, ESL special education, and home/school connections.  Weekly observations in local public schools are required outside of regularly scheduled class time.

A study of how middle schools, working with other institutions, can best meet the needs of the young adolescents who are experiencing significant developmental changes.  Since the onset of these changes and the rate at which they occur vary considerably, there is tremendous pressure on the individual to cope with her changing person.  The purpose of this course is to examine effective strategies that can be used to help the student make this difficult transition from elementary to secondary education.  Field experiences in local public schools required. Prerequisites or corequisites: EDU 232 and EDU 234 or by permission.

Prospective elementary teachers will become familiar with the curriculum, resources, and pedagogical practices for the teaching of social studies in the elementary school. Students will examine national and state social studies standards and integrate technology in preparation for designing learning experiences for students in primary and upper elementary classrooms. Prerequisite or Corequisite: EDU-234.

A study of the content, resources, and strategies for the teaching of science in the elementary school.  The particular needs of the early childhood and intermediate teacher will be considered. Admission to the Teacher Education program or permission of the instructor is required.

The focus in this course is on the instructional planning in mathematics based upon formative and summative assessment for large and small groups of students in the intermediate-upper elementary grade classroom.  Based upon constructivist theories, strategies and tools will be used to plan instruction that develops and extends students' understanding of number, operations, measurement, geometry, and data, algebraic thinking through reasoning, problem solving, communication, and connections. Also included are specific instructional strategies for helping students with diverse learning needs develop mathematical literacy. Approximately eight hours of focused, daytime field experiences (observations, student assessment interview, & small group instruction) at a partner school in a grade 3-5 classroom are required. Prerequisites: MAT-160 and MAT-260; EDU-304 and admission to the Teacher Education Program; Corequisite: EDU-410. This course is for students completing a K-6 license.

The course will address the research, theory, and instructional practices related to learning, teaching, and assessing literacy in the elementary classroom.  Emphasis will be given to assessing students and classes and using assessment to inform instruction, using literacy with content material, and incorporating technology and literacy.  Focus is on the teacher as decision-maker in the elementary classroom.  Candidates will learn specific strategies for helping students with diverse learning needs (ELL, learning disabilities, academically gifted) extend their understanding of literacy.  Candidates will also learn how to collaborate with school specialists and families to meet the literacy learning needs of all students.  Approximately eight hours of daytime focused field experiences (observations, student assessments, and lessons) at a partner school are required.  Prerequisites: ENG-320, EDU-310.  Corequisite: EDU-404.

This course is designed as an investigation of adolescence, including a specific focus on adolescents with unique learning needs. Drawing from research, personal experiences, the experiences of others, music, and stories, you will consider the total educative environment of adolescents; the interplay between the inner psychological challenges and outer socio-cultural challenges facing adolescents; as well as the physical, cognitive, and emotional changes that adolescence involves. Particular focus will be given to the inclusion of adolescents with learning differences in the general classroom,  including adapting instruction, assignments and assessments, as well as collaboration with other professionals and families to meet the needs of all students.  Prerequisites: EDU-234 and PSY-312 and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

An examination of literacy strategies in the context of content area instruction and teaching tools to enhance strategic learning in classrooms. Attention will be paid to information and communication technologies (ICT) and new literacies as they impact instruction and learning in classrooms and the selection and evaluation of literacy materials used to teach content. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: Methods Course.

This course is designed for candidates who are student teaching in the fall (rather than the typical student teaching in the spring semester).  It provides opportunity for candidates to apply/practice teaching knowledge and skills during a semester without any courses in Education.  During the semester following completion of the literacy/mathematics methods sequence (first courses in the spring; second courses in the fall), candidates will take a one credit class which is field based.  The practicum will provide candidates with experiences in the classroom in the areas of literacy and mathematics among others.  Field experience in local public schools is required.  Pre-requisite: Admissions to the Teacher Education Program; EDU 310 and EDU 410.

A capstone seminar taken concurrently with student teaching.  This course is designed to strengthen the professional skills of reflection as related to instructional practice, assessment and evaluation of student learning, and analysis of personal and effective classroom practices. Emphasis is placed on the five areas of the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards. Prerequisite:  Admission to the Teacher Education Program and student teaching.  Co-requisite:  EDU-490.

Capstone experience for the teacher education program.  Provides the student a semester-long field experience at the appropriate grade level(s) in a public school setting.  Development of teaching strategies that foster academic achievement for a diverse student population. Focuses on curriculum and instruction, planning, assessment, collaboration, and classroom management.  Admission to the Teacher Education Program is a prerequisite.  EDU-460 is a  co-requisite. Internship fee assessed.  Pass/Fail grading only.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. The project must meet honors program thesis requirements as well as expectations of the education faculty. Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only.

Open to junior and senior students interested in doing research in education.  In conjunction with a faculty member, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a formal written report and an oral presentation.  The student will be expected to work approximately three hours per week for each semester hour of credit.  A “Research Course Information Form” completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. Prerequisite: EDU-232 or EDU-234 (may be waived at the discretion of the faculty mentor for students not seeking licensure).

This course explores major theories and models for understanding how children and adolescents learn; seeks to understand the complex interaction among biological, sociocultural, and psychological factors that influence learning; applies this knowledge about learning to learning and teaching in schools; and investigates the interplay between school culture and students' cultures and the implications for student achievement. The course begins with a sharp focus on the student as an individual learner, then centers on the individual working with a teacher, and finally, centers on the learner in cultural context. Explanations of structural barriers to student achievement are examined including stereotype threat, curriculum-home communication mismatch, the privileging of certain approaches to learning, and solutions for teachers are investigated. The importance of close observation of children/adolescents and careful consideration of actual student achievement data in sociocultural context are stressed. Field experiences required. 

One challenge that teachers face is how to work with a broad range of cultural, linguistic, and intellectual differences among their students. This course will examine differences and similarities among students and explore sociocultural and structural influences on student achievement. It will address the questions, “Who are the students in the classroom?” and “What must teachers consider when planning and implementing instruction for all of their students?”  The course will focus on basic concepts related to addressing student needs through differentiation, inclusion, and teaching English as a Second Language. Field experiences required.

This course will critically examine the role of technology in the K-12 classroom and incorporate the basic technology tools of teachers, their applications and the ethics associated with the profession.  Field experiences required. 

A look at language as a system with particular focus on teaching English as Second Language to students in public schools grades K-12. Considers teaching implications of English grammar, phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax. Field experiences required.

An introduction to the study of functional human movement with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system to include muscle and skeletal structure identification and function, joint structure and actions, planes of motions, axes and levers and analysis of movement patterns.  Provides an orientation to the scientific basis of the health and motor-related components of physical fitness and medical terminology.

An overview of the field of physical education, sport and fitness with emphasis placed on historical, and socio-psychological foundations and their implications on today's society.  The course includes the study of subdisciplines in the field, career opportunities and future directions. Issues and ethical concerns are introduced.

This course is designed to provide practical application of fitness, wellness and conditioning concepts. The course provides a comprehensive, comparative overview of the physiological responses and adaptations of resistive training and aerobic and anaerobic exercise.  A comprehensive study of training theory and methodologies is included.

This course is an examination of various leadership considerations related to conducting lifetime physical activities.  Emphasis will be on appropriate development and implementation of community and school-based activity programs, effective use of communication, collaboration, and problem-solving skills, understanding needs and characteristics of varied participant groups, and demonstration of specialized activity content knowledge.

A course designed to provide instruction in the prevention and care of movement injuries. This course will include an introduction to athletic training, fundamentals of injury prevention and evaluation, and the management of the most common dance and sport-related injuries.  Emphasis will be placed on providing practical opportunities to develop evaluation skills and taping techniques. Open to ESS and Dance Majors only.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate an original research problem that will culminate in a review of the literature and proposed methods for the research problem selected. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours with permission of department head.

The study of the organization and administration of physical education, sport and fitness programs with emphasis on facility and personnel management as it relates to curricular, financial, physical, social, legal, and medical issues.

This course is designed to prepare the student through active participation to develop practical knowledge and skills necessary to instruct group fitness programs.  Students will learn teaching methodologies for the following types of training: basic aerobics and step aerobics, circuits, stability ball, medicine ball, tubes and bands, light free weights, flexibility, and floor exercise.

This course provides students with information about exercise testing and prescription. Students will develop the skills and technical procedures necessary to conduct exercise and sport fitness testing using a variety of technologies. Hands-on experience will be available for a variety of different fitness and health-related tests. Prerequisite: ESS-383.
 

The study of topics in the discipline of exercise and sport science as determined by faculty expertise and student interest.  Possible topics to be offered are:  psychology of movement, sociology of sport, movement and aging, and principles and theories of coaching.  A  description of the selected topic will be included in the registration schedule. May be taken for course credit more than once with a different topic. Course prerequisites will be listed as appropriate. Course open to juniors and seniors only.

This course is designed to provide an examination of principles and practices that affect the learning and development of motor skills; theories of motor learning, motor control, and development; lifespan motor development perspective related to performing motor and sport skills; and professional applications of the motor learning and development in exercise science-related fields. Laboratory and field- based experiences will be included.

A course designed to examine the body’s response and adaptation to exercise and sport and the implication of these changes for physical education and fitness programs. The course includes muscular adaptation, energy systems, and the effects of environmental factors, diet, gender, and the methods of physical training. Laboratory experiences will enable students to explore and integrate this knowledge through practical application of exercise for health and human performance.
Prerequisites: For HWE concentration, BIO 338/348 and BIO 339/349. For HPE concentration, BIO 322/342

This course designed to provide students with information about the analysis, and interpretation of research in the fields of exercise and sport science. Emphasis will be placed on comparing different research methods, statistical analysis techniques and interpretation as they relate to various topics in exercise and sport science.

A supervised field experience in a fitness, sport, or wellness-related agency.  Students will meet regularly with a college supervisor to integrate exercise and sports science knowledge with their practicum experiences. Students should make arrangements with the practicum coordinator and their advisor the semester prior to taking the practicum.  This course is limited to majors who have completed their junior year. Prerequisites: ESS-383, ESS-486.

This course provides a culminating experience for students.  The seminar format will assist students in summarizing and reflecting on experiences learned and demonstrated through their program of study.  Each student will prepare and present a professional portfolio to the department as an exit requirement. Course limited to seniors.

A study of the neuromuscular and mechanical principles of movement. This course examines the way bones and muscles work in all types of dance and sport-related activities.  Content also includes understanding muscular imbalances, physiological support systems, body types, movement behavior, and movement efficiency. Prerequisites: BIO-322/342; or BIO 338/348 and BIO 339/349.

This course will provide an introduction to the physiological basis of health and fitness assessments, methods of assessment, and exercise prescription plans required to bring about changes in the health and fitness of both healthy individuals as well as those requiring accommodation for special needs or medical conditions.  Course content will also include the business management aspects of a career in fitness program development. Prerequisites: BIO-322/342; or BIO 338/348 and BIO 339/349.

This course introduces the design and application of research methodologies in exercise and sports science. The student will formulate an original research project that will culminate in a research paper and presentation. Open to senior majors and minors; others with instructor permission.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate an original research project that will culminate in a research paper and presentation.  Open to senior majors and minors; others with instructor approval. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours with permission from the department head. Prerequisite: MAT-175, MAT-181, or MAT-191.

Study of the role health and physical education plays in child development, school curriculum, and society.  Prospective teachers will learn basic knowledge, skills, and dispositions in the fields of health and physical education to allow them to prepare developmentally appropriate lessons using the Healthful Living Curriculum.  Course includes observations and teaching experiences in a school setting during school hours.

A course designed to offer prospective physical education teachers with experience in instructional methodology appropriate at the elementary level.  Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of theory and practice in  physical education at the elementary level and understanding the role of physical education in the development of children.  Emphasis on the “movement approach” to learning motor skills, creative dance, rhythms, stunts and tumbling, movement games, and physical fitness activities is provided.  Content includes curriculum design, planning and implementing units and lessons, teaching approaches, assessment and evaluation appropriate at the elementary school level. Extensive field experiences are required. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

This course provides students with experiences in teaching and examining policies, practices, principles, instructional methodologies, and programs related to meeting the physical education needs of special populations. Includes field experiences. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

This course will provide prospective physical education teachers with opportunities to learn about, plan, and implement instructional, motivational, management, and assessment strategies to develop the healthful living curriculum, with primary focus on physical education, in the secondary school environment. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

An analysis of consumer decision making in the marketplace; government protection for the consumer; consumer credit institutions; insurance, investments, management of personal finances, retirement and estate planning.  No credit given in major for business, or economics.  Also offered as ECO-274.

Historical and theoretical perspectives, and current trends in various disciplines in Human Environmental Sciences are explored.  Students will be provided with the foundation to apply human systems theory and life course development to their area of specialization in Child Development, Family and Consumer Sciences, Fashion Merchandising and Design, and Interior Design.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and problems in Family and Consumer Sciences.  This course will provide an introduction to the methods and techniques of the discipline.  The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor.  May be repeated for a total of six credit hours.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required.

The use of human resources to promote individual and family development.  Emphasis on family life management skills from a woman's perspective.

Investigation of historic development, interdisciplinary nature, integrative approach, and ethical perspectives of Family and Consumer Sciences field of study; introduction to professional opportunities within business, education, research, and service agencies; formulation of individual career plan.

Provides a culminating experience for Family & Consumer Sciences majors seeking careers in business and community services. The internship is selected by the student through career analysis, and is conducted in cooperation with an approved internship sponsor.  The student must work 150 hours total over the course of the semester in an approved site.  Prerequisite:  FCS-424.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the family and consumer sciences faculty.  A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration.  Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Scholars Programs.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research or creative project exploring topics and problems in Family and Consumer Sciences.  The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of six credit hours.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: FCS-355.

A study of planning, implementing, and evaluating family and consumer sciences programs. Emphasis on identifying needs of learners, writing objectives, planning lessons, using a variety of teaching/learning strategies, and assessing effectiveness.  Required for secondary family and consumer sciences licensure students and food and nutrition majors. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program, nutrition majors or with permission of the instructor.

A survey of the curriculum for secondary family and consumer sciences education.  Includes a program philosophy, organization, needs assessment, advisory committees, curriculum development, vocational student organizations [FCCLA], and legislation.  Includes field experience.  Required of secondary family and consumer sciences education majors. Open to students admitted to the teacher education program or with permission of the instructor.

A study of the operations involved in the production and merchandising of apparel including fashion dynamics and product life cycle.

The practical application of basic construction techniques including pattern alterations and analysis of quality construction in ready-to-wear. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory each week.

A study of promotional techniques used in successful retail operations.  Emphasis is placed on merchandise display, fashion show production, and floor space layout.

The study of the social and psychological aspects of clothing in our society today.  The meaning of clothes in specific social situations, cultural contexts of dress, clothing as a form of nonverbal communications, and individual thought processes about clothing and appearance are studied.

Basic principles and methods used in garment structure and design with emphasis on flat pattern. Prerequisite: FMD-115 with C grade or better.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating issues and problems in clothing and fashion merchandising.  This course will provide an introduction to the methods and techniques of the discipline. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: FMD-114.

A study of retail operations including store management, buying procedures, retail organization, and merchandising mathematics. Includes laboratory application of retail functions.

A study of the history of European and American costume in relation to religious, political, technological, and artistic movements from the Egyptian period [2700 B.C.] to the 20th century. Also offered as ART-315.

The application of technical, creative, and analytical skills in developing seasonal apparel lines.  Emphasis will be placed on targeting market identification, selecting fabric and trimmings in relation to price determination, developing operation sheets, and budgeting seasonal collections.  Prerequisites: FMD-114, FMD-115.

The study of gathering, analyzing, interpreting and diffusing information for the purpose of increasing the competitive advantage for the textile and apparel branches of the fashion industry.

A study of the principles of apparel design using the draping method. Emphasis on fit, design, appropriateness, and construction techniques. May be taken without prerequisite courses with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: FMD-115 with a grade of C or better.

Exploration of basic proportions of the various fashion figures with an emphasis on female market segment. Introduction of fashion sketching techniques using various media and professional materials to communicate original design ideas. Prerequisites: ART-101 with a grade of C or better; FMD-115 with a grade of C or better; and FMD-227 or FMD-325.

A study of textile products from raw materials through manufacturing and finishing of fabrics.  Emphasis on selection and care of textiles.

This course will be a culminating experience for fashion majors. It will examine career opportunities in the fashion industry with specific emphasis on qualifications for each different job. It will examine professional etiquette, professional behavior, and best practices in the field. It will provide instruction for and the opportunity to compile a portfolio for the design OR merchandising student.

Advanced techniques in garment selection, fitting, and construction. Analysis of custom and fusible methods of tailoring. One lecture and five hours of laboratory each week.  Prerequisites: FMD-115 with a grade of C or better, FMD-227, and FMD-325.

Applications of apparel design techniques utilizing the computer to facilitate the design process. Emphasis will be placed on original garments and textile designs. Students must have computer experience. Prerequisites: FMD-115 with a grade of C or better, and FMD-227 or FMD-325.

This course applies retail strategy and merchandising principles to the day-to-day activities and responsibilities of a retail buyer. Emphasis on customer identification, sales forecasting, merchandise budgeting, assortment planning, merchandise procurement, and vendor analysis. Prerequisite: FMD-314.

An in-depth study of problems which retailers are currently facing.  Business environments are simulated for students to analyze, evaluate, and select alternative solutions which would best suit each firm studied.  Recommendations will be submitted in the form of oral and written reports. Prerequisite: FMD-314.

A study of retailing as it embraces multichannel distribution.  Course content includes the evolution, components and strategies used in multichannel retailing, as well as legal, technological and ethical issues.  Customer service, consumer behavior, social media strategies, business intelligence and supply chain issues will also be studied as they relate to alternative channels of distribution. Prerequisite: FMD 314.

As a group, senior design students will prepare and install an exhibition of their work or produce a fashion show featuring their own designs. Students are responsible for all aspects of their project including the promotion of the show or exhibit, labeling of items, securing models and/or dress forms, staging or set up, and hospitality arrangements.  Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in FMD-227, FMD-325, FMD-327, FMD-426, ART-101 and ART-110.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the clothing and fashion merchandising faculty.  A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration.  Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research or creative project exploring issues and problems in Fashion Merchandising and Design. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor.  May be repeated for credit for a total of six credit hours.  A  research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor’s consent required. Prerequisites: FMD-114 and FMD-314.

The scientific principles of food selection and preparation.  Two lectures and three hours of laboratory each week.  Lab fee assessed. Corequisite: FN-126.

An introductory laboratory designed for students with interest in pursuing a major in food and nutrition or family and consumer sciences. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the principles of foods considered in FN-124. Topics include protein denaturation/coagulation, chemical and biological leavening, and supersaturated sugars. Meets three hours per week.  Corequisite: FN-124.

Basic principles of human nutrition with emphasis on nutrients, factors which affect their utilization in the human body, and the significance of application in diets for individuals and groups.

Principles of human nutrition applied to meet the health and nutrition needs at different stages of the life cycle.  This course will cover cognitive and physiologic changes that impact nutrient needs throughout the human lifespan.  Students will begin exploring nutrition for preconception, pregnancy, and lactation, then go on to examine nutrition during infancy, toddler/preschool ages, school-age childhood, preadolescence, and adolescence.  Students will end the course looking at nutrition during aging adulthood and considering nutrition during end of life care.  Prerequisite: FN 227

This course explores traditional cultural foods from around the world for the purpose of increasing cultural competency and effective communication with others.  Foodways include but are not limited to how food is selected, prepared, and consumed.  Flavor profiles and commonly used ingredients and dishes will be studied.  Students will examine their own food culture, biases, and how these impact personal and professional interactions with others.  Sensory experiences including tastings will expose students to a variety of flavor profiles allowing students to compare and contrast flavors.  Prerequisites: FN 227.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and problems in Food and Nutrition.  This course will provide an introduction to the research methods and techniques of the discipline.  The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation.  Open to freshmen and sophomore majors in the Nutrition, Health and Human Performance department and others by permission of the instructor.  May be repeated for up to a total of six credit hours.  A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: FN-227.

Introduction to the use of food quality management in food service systems, including the application of quantity food production principles, with an emphasis on quality quantity food production, menu planning, food service equipment use, and facility design.  Prerequisite:  FN-124/126. Corequisites: FN-311 or FN-312.

Laboratory experiments designed to apply food service production and management skills in quantity food settings. This course is designated for Food and Nutrition majors to supplement work in FN-310.  Three laboratory hours per week. Lab fee assessed. Prerequisite: FN-124/126. Corequisite: FN-310.

Laboratory experiments designed to apply food service production and management skills in conventional and industrial settings.  This course is designated for Family and Consumer Science majors to supplement work in FN-310.  Three laboratory hours per week. Lab fee assessed. Prerequisite: FN-124/126. Corequisite: FN-310.

Introduction to dietary interventions focused on the treatment of common diet- and food- related health ailments.  Course topics and learning objectives will correspond to applied menu planning and hands-on food preparation complementary to the management of these health conditions.  Dietary approaches and interventions based on scientific research will be examined.  Lab fee assessed.  Prerequisite: FN 124/126.

A critical exploration of food systems and health disparities from local, regional, and international perspectives.  A special emphasis on determinants of health for underserved populations as well as nutrition services provided to the public through various agencies and organizations.  Concepts on community food security, food sovereignty, food justice, and agricultural sustainability are presented and discussed, as well as frameworks and community-based strategies to improve food security and address health outcomes.  Prerequisite: FN 227, FN 251. 

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the food and nutrition faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research project exploring topics and problems in Food and Nutrition. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for up to a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: FN-227, 8 credits from CHE, 7 credits from BIO.

A course designed to provide students with knowledge of personal and community health. Special emphasis on developing positive health attitudes and practices.

A course designed to prepare students with knowledge and skills to administer immediate care to victims of injuries and sudden illness. Students who successfully complete the course will receive American Red Cross Certification. Course fee assessed.

This course is designed to provide students with a greater understanding of the scientific basis for health status, the role of human behavior, and the impact of public policy upon health status.  Students will learn the theoretical foundations of health behavior, the principles essential to developing health literacy and the concepts relevant to health risk reduction and health promotion.

A course designed to develop understanding in the conceptual knowledge of health and fitness in the development and maintenance of human wellness. The course will allow each student to plan a program of physical activity that meets her unique needs and interests. The ultimate goal is to help students plan for a lifetime of wellness including physical fitness and healthy nutrition.

The research literature on sexual interests, behaviors and relationships is reviewed through the study of the changing practices and perceptions of sexuality in America. Topics include the cultural construction of sex, the process of learning to be sexual, sexual deviance, the influence of marriage, and the interplay between sex and power in our society. Recognition of both risks and rewards associated with sexuality provides the context for studying controversial policies in society. Also offered as SOC-332.

This course will address specific health issues that reach beyond our borders and will examine the impact and influence of communities on global health. The course will focus on three components of world health, including health disparities, nutrition, and communicable and non-communicable diseases. Students will consider these components from historical, social, cultural, political, and economic perspectives. Prerequisite: 75 hours completed upon course enrollment.

Course content will cover methods and materials of teaching health education in a variety of settings. Students will obtain the necessary skills to plan and implement a variety of health promotion lessons and methods in clinical, school, hospital or work site settings. Students will present prepared units/lessons to target populations such as: employees, students, community members or patients. A practicum is a required part of this course.

A study of architectural interiors and furnishings from antiquity to present. Relationship of architecture, art, and furniture styles to interiors. Survey of contemporary furniture designers. Also offered as ART-142.

An exploration of the basic elements and principles of interior design. Includes application of design principles to human environments. Emphasis on design solution, relevant to human needs. Introduction to architectural drawing. Six studio hours per week. Also offered as ART-144.

Continued exploration of the design process and utilizing graphic communication techniques to visually communicate design solutions.  Exploration of presentation methods and techniques.  Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: ID-144.  Prerequisite or Co-requisite ART-110. Studio fee assessed. 

Residential interior design studio. Included will be the solution of residential design problems, preparation of appropriate drawings and models, application of universal design principles and aging in place. Historic adaptation of residential spaces. Specifications of finishes, furnishings and equipment for residential interiors. Six studio hours each week. Prerequisites: ART-110, ID-243. Studio fee assessed. 

Study of psychological, physiological, social, and environmental aspects of shelter. Included will be a study of the housing needs of elderly and handicapped; cross-cultural perspective of housing; ergonomics; historic preservation; energy efficiency; and government policies influencing housing.
 

In-depth study of materials and their appropriate application used in interior design; including flooring, window treatments, wall coverings and furniture. Quality, utilization and sustainability as factors in material selection are included. Calculations of materials for flooring, soft window treatments, upholstered furniture and wall covering installations are covered.
 

Exploration of technology techniques and tools for Interior Design. Design software and internet exploration. Introduction of computer aided drafting and design. Prerequisites: ID-144; Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-243, ID-244.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and problems in Interior Design. This course will provide an introduction to the methods and techniques of the discipline. The research experience will culminate in a paper and/or presentation. Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: ID-144.
 

Application of advanced computer aided design for residential and commercial interiors. Further exploration of overlay design packages. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248. Studio fee assessed.
 

Survey of residential and non-residential systems, building materials, traditional and sustainable construction methods, and custom millwork design. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, and ART-110. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-342. Studio fee assessed.
 

Application of design solutions for commercial and residential interiors. Included will be exploration of sustainable materials, solving design problems for diverse populations, and the study of building codes. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ART-110.  Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-342. Studio fee assessed.
 

Exploration of light as a design element in interior design; lighting theory; emphasis on technical aspects of lighting; lighting calculations; lighting specification and installation. Studio problems with application to residential, office, hospitality, retail, and institutional settings.  Prerequisites: ID-144,  ID-243.  Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-244,  ID-248.
 

Exploration of business principles and practices of interior design. Using ethical practice in design management students gain knowledge and application of basic business processes. Introduction to professional organizations and professional development and creating a portfolio are covered. Students must have senior standing to enroll. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ART-110. Prerequisite or corequisite: ID-342, ID-344.
 

Execution of creative and functional solutions for commercial interior design problems. Included will be study of space planning and specification of traditional and sustainable materials and furnishings for non-residential interiors.  Lecture and six studio hours each week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ID-342, ID-344, ART-110. Studio fee assessed.
 

Senior level design studio course exploring various design problems in complexity, size and scope. Emphasis is given to multi-use spaces. Research and related reading are included. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ID-342, ID-344. ART-110. Studio fee assessed.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the interior design faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Scholars Programs.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research or creative project exploring issues and problems in Interior Design. The research experience will culminate in a paper and/or presentation. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: ID-244.
 

A course designed for non-swimmers with emphasis on water adjustment and basic strokes essential for survival in the water. Course is offered off campus.

This course will offer an introduction to four different fitness disciplines. The course will expose students to Cardio Dance, Strength Training, Barre Fusion, and Yoga at an introductory beginning level. Basic concepts and skills will be introduced along with movement in each area. Each discipline will last approximately 2-weeks.

**This class is fully online in an asynchronous format.

A course designed for the sedentary individual who strives to progress into running. The course is designed to appropriately progress the student into a running program and culminates with a campus 5 kilometer run.

A course designed to provide cardiovascular fitness through aerobic dance movements. This course explores aerobic workouts such as hi-lo impact, step, funk, and interval aerobics.

An introduction to strength training with emphasis on the basic principles of exercise, and safe and effective training techniques.

A water aerobics course with emphasis on improving cardiovascular fitness through movement exercise in the water to music. Must be able to swim two lengths of the pool to enroll in this course. Course is offered off campus.

An introduction to a variety of exercises to increase muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility using resistance bands and tubes, fit balls, free weights and medicine balls.

A course designed to provide students with opportunities to gain knowledge and skills necessary for safe and effective strength training and cardiovascular conditioning. Students will have access to strength machines and free weights, as well as cardiovascular equipment such as stationary bikes, climbers, treadmills and elliptical trainers.
 

A course designed to provide students with a functional understanding of the health-related fitness components and their effect on daily living and long-term health. Discussion of health risks, nutritional factors and principles of exercise are included. Emphasis is on walking, jogging and running activities as a means of improving health-related fitness, also stresses setting long-term goals to change or maintain wellness.

A course designed to strengthen core musculature and increase flexibility. Specific attention is given to safe and effective balance, breathing, and posture.

This course will use a variety of methods and means to achieve a total body workout: some of which include free weights, medicine balls, tubing, steps and blocks, and mats and balls. Some time will be spent outdoors to create fitness ‘obstacle’ courses utilizing all of the above to help create a challenging and interactive workout. Training will include, but is not limited to, strength, cardiovascular, plyometric and flexibility methods.

This course is designed to teach self-defense beginning with prevention through awareness, learning statistics, making smarter choices in areas concerning social media, how to present yourself, routines and more. It will also provide knowledge on deterring attackers and various defenses against attackers. Participants will gain knowledge on how to legally keep yourself safe in the event of an attack including how to work with 911 and law enforcement. Through participation in the course, students will have a well-rounded understanding of how to prevent an attack and what to do in the event of an attack. Upon completion of the course participants will receive a Certificate of Completion.

Barre classes are a popular alternative to common strength and cardiovascular combination workouts. “Barre Fusion” provides a challenging ‘interval’ format which consists of segments of strength, cardiovascular and dance inspired moves to help create a total body workout. The Barre format also provides opportunities to focus on balance training, which can be effective cross training and also good for injury prevention. This class will provide instruction in strength training (and the other components) using dance and ballet inspired moves to provide an overall total body workout. Special attention and time will be devoted to isolation and isometric exercises, flexibility and also balance to help create muscle isolation and thus, fatigue. No experience in dance is required.

Instruction in target shooting with bow and arrows, safety precautions, equipment use, scoring, and terminology. Recommended for all skill levels.

A course designed for beginners which includes instruction in basic badminton skills [grip, strokes, and serve], rules and strategies for singles and doubles play, and in-class competition.

Instruction in ball selection, grip, stance, approach, delivery, bowling etiquette, safety precautions, rules, scoring, and terminology. Taught off campus, transportation not provided. Activity fee assessed.

A course designed for beginners which includes instruction in basic golf skills [grip, stance, full-swing with irons, chipping, approach shots, and putting], etiquette, safety precautions, rules, scoring, and terminology.  Activity fee assessed.

A beginning course which includes instruction in basic tennis skills [grip, groundstrokes, serve, and volley], rules and strategies for singles and doubles play, and in-class competition. Must supply own racket.

The art of sword play will be introduced to students in a safe and controlled manner. Students will learn mobility and manipulative skills to attack and defend themselves against an opponent. Students will also learn the history and etiquette of this ancient sport, as well as gain knowledge of how to officiate fencing bouts.

This course provides a foundation for beginners. Students learn warm-up and breathing exercises, as well as basic Yoga asanas. Particular attention is given to exploring the internal support for external alignment and posture.

This course is to serve as an introduction to the American Karate system for the purpose of improving flexibility, balance, muscular strength, movement coordination, and cardiovascular fitness. Through a systematic training program of repetition, the student will learn the application of simple karate techniques and gain the ability to defend herself in an attack situation. Activity fee assessed.

An introduction to international folk dances, American square dances and contemporary Country-Western dances. Appropriate for all levels. Also offered as DAN-152.

A beginning level course which includes instruction in shooting, passing, ball-handling, basic offensive and defensive strategies; opportunity for team play.

A beginning level course which includes instruction in shooting, ball-handling, goal-tending, basic offensive and defensive strategies; opportunity for team play.

A beginning level course which includes instruction in basic fast-pitch softball skills [hitting, fielding, and base-running], basic offensive and defensive strategies; opportunity for team play. Fast-pitch experience NOT required.

A beginning level course which includes instruction in setting, passing, hitting, serving; basic offensive and defensive strategies; opportunity for team play.
 

A beginning course which includes instruction of Native American traditions and history, basic skills, rules, and strategies needed to develop a rudimentary level of competency in the sport of lacrosse in order to participate at a level that maintains or improves overall health. Students will also learn about basic offensive and defensive tactics and strategies essential to appropriate competition. This is a fast-paced and physically active team sport which also requires teamwork and sportsmanship.
 

A beginning course which includes instruction of basic skills, rules, and strategies needed to develop a rudimentary level of competency in the sport of field hockey in order to participate at a level that maintains or improves overall health. Students will be introduced to the skills of dribbling, passing, receiving, shooting, and defensive tackles. Students will also learn about basic offensive and defensive tactics and strategies essential to appropriate competition during practice drills and game-like situations. Teamwork and sportsmanship will be practiced daily in drills and game situations.
 

An intermediate level course that includes stroke mechanics and physical conditioning, through lap swimming. Class is offered off campus

A fitness course with emphasis on combining boxing punches and footwork with kicks and blocks from martial art forms. Conditioning exercises such as plyometric, agility drills, push-ups, punch-kick combinations, abs, and flexibility training are included.

An introduction to flag football, lacrosse, speedball, floor hockey, pickleball, and selected recreational sport activities. Includes instruction in basic skills, strategies, and rules.

This course will provide an overview of outdoor recreation skills and related activities. Students will be provided with opportunities to gain the skills and knowledge required to engage in various outdoor leisure activities such as orienteering, Ultimate Frisbee, and outdoor education. Student will be introduced to low-risk adventure activities and community options for participation in outdoor recreation. At least one off-campus activity is required. Off-campus selection may require a fee.

Refinement of badminton skills with an emphasis on drills and strategies for singles and doubles play with in-class competition. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor's consent. Prerequisite: PED-141 or equivalent experience/skill.

Review of basic bowling skills and refinement of the delivery, approach, and spare conversion; opportunity for competitive matches. Taught off-campus, transportation not provided. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor's consent.  Activity fee assessed. Prerequisite: PED-142 or equivalent experience/skill.

Refinement of golf skills with instruction on full-swing with irons and woods, chipping, approach shots, sand play and putting; rules, scoring and course management. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor's consent. Activity fee assessed.  Prerequisite: PED-143 or equivalent experience/skill.

Review of basic tennis skills with an emphasis on footwork, groundstrokes, service, volley, lobs, overheads, rules and strategies for singles and doubles and in-class competition. Must bring own racket. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor's consent. Prerequisite: PED-146 or equivalent experience/skill.

This intermediate course is to serve as an extension of Karate I. The student will be encouraged to test for the rank of Green Tip in this class. The Karate II students will learn advanced Katas, Self Defense, and sparring. May be taken without course prerequisite with instructor's consent. Activity fee assessed. Prerequisite: PED-149 or equivalent experience/skill.

This advanced course is to serve as an extension of Karate II. The student will be expected to expand her skill level and knowledge of Kata, Self Defense, and Sparring. She will be encouraged to complete the requirements for Green Belt. May be taken without prerequisite course with instructor's consent. Activity fee assessed. Prerequisite: PED-249 or equivalent experience/skill.

Students may enroll in the course during the traditional competitive season. This course is designed for students who participate as players on an intercollegiate athletics sports team to gain physical education activity credits. Students-athletes will gain knowledge of rules and strategies for their respective sports, as well as technique and skills to perform in competitive sports. Participation in traditional season practices and competitions is also a strong component of the course. Membership is by tryout only. A physical examination immediately preceding the sports season is required. May be taken a second time for elective credit only. To enroll, you must be a full time Meredith student-athlete. Pass/fail grading only.

An introduction to the scientific study of behavioral and mental processes. Topics includes the neurobiological basis of behavior; perception; development; learning; memory and thinking; motivation; personality; normal and abnormal behavior;  psychotherapy; and social factors in behavior.

This course is a study of human characteristics and changes from conception to death. At each developmental stage, major topics covered are physical and motor change, cognitive development, emotional and personality growth, and social development. Prerequisite: PSY-100 or EDU-234. 

The understanding of gender roles from a psychological viewpoint. Topics included are a critique of the psychoanalytic view of gender differences, the effects of body states on personality, psychophysiological dysfunctions of the reproductive system, differences between male and female brains, differences in the way male and female infants behave, how sexual identity develops, and self-esteem, achievement motivation, and changes in the roles the different sexes play during their lifetimes. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

A field experience in psychology involving exploration of psychology-related careers in community agencies, mental health services, business, government or educational settings which provides students with exposure to the profession of psychology. Attendance at a biweekly seminar and completion of written assignments is required. Open to sophomores and first semester juniors.  May be repeated for credit.  A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned. Application and instructor’s consent required. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in the execution of an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Open to freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

The first semester in this two-course sequence is an introduction to the history, methods, data collection, statistical analysis, and ethics of general experimental psychology.  Research studies will be developed, executed, analyzed, reported in American Psychological Association (APA) style, and presented.  Measures of central tendency and deviation, linear and function-free correlation, hypothesis testing, survey designs, and nonparametric techniques will be covered.  Prerequisite:  PSY-100.

The second semester in this two-course sequence will continue the study of research methodology, data collection, statistical analysis and ethics of experimental psychology.  Research studies will be further developed, executed, analyzed, reported in American Psychological Association (APA) style, and presented.  The designs covered include independent group-, between subject-, and within subject-designs along with the various forms of analysis of variance (ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA, and Repeated Measures ANOVA).  Prerequisites: PSY-100, PSY-301.

This course is designed to assist students in preparing themselves to enter the profession of psychology. Through a progressive series of applied assignments, students will examine psychological research on career decision making and job satisfaction; evaluate their own strengths, interests, and values; set career and life goals; identify and plan a strategy to prepare themselves for careers and/or graduate training; enhance professional selfpresentation skills; examine issues of ethical conduct in applied psychological settings; and otherwise prepare themselves to enter the workforce as psychology majors. This course is most appropriate for junior psychology majors.

This course focuses on the typical physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development of humans from conception to adolescence.  Theories and research findings will guide understanding of the multiple influences on the behavior of infants, children, and teens. Prerequisite: PSY-100 or EDU-234.

An introduction to the psychological and educational issues associated with the major exceptionalities. Topics covered include Autism Spectrum Disorders, Intellectual Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, Giftedness, and Communication Disorders. Prerequisite: PSY-100 or EDU-234.

A study of the major forms of behavioral pathology and current therapies. Topics covered include anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, affective disorders, schizophrenic disorders, and chronic brain syndromes.  Prerequisite: PSY-100.
 

An examination of the principles of classical and operant conditioning including reinforcement, stimulus control, and extinction, and the application of these principles in a variety of settings, including the control and modification of one's own behavior. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

Health Psychology is concerned with the interface between health and psychology, between behavior and wellness/illness. It looks at physiological and psychological functioning, and studies the interrelationship between mind, body and culture/environment. In the course we look at both US and world health issues and examine such topics as health behaviors, stress and coping, illness prevention, wellness promotion, public policy, and the biopsychosocial model and emphasizes a multi-disciplinary perspective. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

A survey of the functional anatomy of the nervous system. Special emphasis on current views of the contributions of various subsystems to psychological phenomena. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

A study of the visual and auditory senses and how they function. How needs, desires, expectations, and previous experiences influence our perception. Understanding of the principles of psychophysics. The course also focuses on cognitive factors in perception. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

Presents a survey of Industrial/Organizational psychology using concepts, case studies, theories, research and direct applications to the study of people within the world of work. A balance between industrial and organizational concepts will guide the class through examining psychology at work and understanding what I/O psychologists who work in applied settings do. Topics will include: job analysis, assessments in employment, job attitudes, performance appraisal and management; and motivation, occupational health, leadership and organizational theory. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

An advanced standing internship in psychology involving the application of knowledge and skills in community agencies, mental health services, business, government or educational settings which provides students with exposure to and experience in the profession of psychology. Attendance at a biweekly seminar and completion of written project assignments and a culminating project is required. May be repeated for credit.  Open to juniors and senior psychology majors upon acceptance of application.  A maximum of 6 credit hours may be earned. Application and instructor’s consent required. Prerequisite: PSY-100. Course fee assessed. Recommended for Seniors and Juniors in their second semester.

An introductory practicum course where students are taught via initial classroom training and video modeling the basic concepts of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and discrete trial teaching (DTT) to work one-on-one with a preschool child with autism. Students will apply learned concepts in order to handle common behaviors and maintain mastered skills of their assigned child. All practicum hours are on campus and attendance is a significant part of grade. Any student who has not met the requirements to advance to Autism Practicum Level II may repeat the course with instructor permission. Course fee assessed. Prerequisite: PSY-100 or permission of the instructor.

An advanced practicum course providing students with an opportunity to build on applied behavioral analysis (ABA) techniques taught in Introductory Autism Practicum to work with preschool children with autism. Students will be expected to apply ABA techniques to make significant behavior changes and use discrete trial training (DTT) to teach new skills. Students are expected to know how to implement a variety of behavior protocols and read and interpret data. All practicum hours are on campus and attendance is a significant part of grade. This course may be repeated with a different client assignment with instructor permission. Prerequisite: PSY-342 and instructor permission.

A study of the theories and research relevant to interpersonal influence, the ways in which an individual is influenced by other people. Topics include: attitude change, conformity, interpersonal attraction, self consistency, aggression, altruism, and social cognition.  Prerequisite: PSY-100.
 

This course is a comprehensive overview of the psychological aspects of aging. Topics include research methods, theories of aging, and age-related changes in sensation/perception, memory, cognition, personality, and late-life psychopathology. Emphasis will be on pathways to successful aging in the context of a shifting balance of gains and losses in psychological and physical functioning. This course is most appropriate for junior and senior psychology and social work majors. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

A consideration of major contemporary theories of personality and the evaluation of these theories in the light of research findings. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

A study of the principles of psychological testing and evaluation in several settings. An introduction to the major types of tests, including tests of general and special abilities, aptitude, achievement, interests, and personality. Prerequisites: PSY-100.

The focus of this course is the historical genesis of current concerns in psychology. Particular emphasis will be placed on the seminal work of the late 19th- and  20th-century psychological pioneers.  Prerequisite: PSY-100.

A survey of the major theories and empirical findings in the field. Emphasis is placed on the active strategies and thought processes used in remembering, speaking and understanding language, reading, concept learning, and problem solving. Prerequisite: PSY-100.
 

A course focused on a special topic in psychology. Topics will be chosen in accordance with faculty and student interest. Intended for students of demonstrated maturity, usually indicated by upper class standing. Topics may include current trends in research and/or professional issues. A description of the topic will be included in the registration schedule for the upcoming semester. May be repeated for credit but no more than three hours may be applied to the 18-hour minor requirement. Prerequisite: PSY-100.

Students who have mastered skills needed in Intermediate Autism Practicum can enroll in this course. Students will read data provided by a discrete trial teaching (DTT) team and analyze trends in learning. Students will take raw data and graph the data to present to assigned consultant for review. Students will continue to provide weekly one-on-one teaching with their assigned child. All practicum hours are on campus and attendance is a significant part of grade. This course may be repeated with a different client assignment with instructor permission. Prerequisite: PSY-343 and instructor permission.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the psychology faculty. Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs who are majoring in psychology. Prerequisites: PSY-100 and PSY-301.

In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. Open to junior and senior psychology majors or minors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six semester hours. Prerequisites: PSY-100 and PSY-301 or instructor permission.

 

An advanced examination of the influence of the presence or perceived presence of others on an individual’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as they intersect in workplace.  A focus on attitudes and attitude change, group processes, social cognition/judgment and decision-making, social influence and leadership, and social-psychological research methods. Prerequisite: Admission to the Early I/O program.

An advanced study of psychological-testing theory and practice, focusing on the nature of psychological constructs, testing theory, individual differences, judgment and decision making in testing, and appropriate methods of test construction and deployment including statistical methods and psychometrics.  Prerequisite: Admission to Early I/O program.

This course introduces students to the profession of social work and the United States social welfare system.  Students learn about the values and ethics of the social work profession and its advocacy for change in social, economic, political, historical, and cultural injustices. The history, mission, and philosophy of the social work profession, with an emphasis on the generalist method of social work practice, are covered. Students explore social work as a career path through completion of 20 hours of service learning in a local social service agency.
 

This course focuses on the diversity of the population of the United States with an emphasis on North Carolina. Students are introduced to the concepts of prejudice, discrimination, oppression and social and economic injustice and to the processes by which these are imposed upon some populations based on age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, identity, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and/or sexual orientation. Methods to combat prejudice, discrimination, and oppression and to restore social justice will be considered.

This course provides content on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments. Content includes empirically based theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems. It focuses on theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development that address the stages of the life span from birth through adolescence. Also addressed is the range of social systems in which people live (individual, family, group, organizational, and community); and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK-100. 

Provides content on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments. Content includes empirically based theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems. It focuses on theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development that address the stages of the life span from young adulthood through death. Also addressed is the range of social systems in which people live (individual, family, group, organizational, and community); and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being. Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK-100.  
 

Open to freshmen and sophomores who have an interest in social work and social welfare and who would like to work individually with a faculty member on a project involving research on an issue of social work practice or social welfare and social justice. In conjunction with a faculty member, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an intermediate level of complexity. The project will require a culminating experience involving a written report and/or a public presentation of its purpose, process, and outcomes. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours. Prerequisite: SWK-100.
 

This course introduces students to both domestic and international social welfare policy. It emphasizes the social work profession's core value of social justice, human and civil rights, and the ideologies that have shaped the United States' and other nations' efforts to provide for their citizens. Frameworks for social policy analysis will be presented. Prerequisite: POL-100.

Topics relevant to social work practice will be customized to reflect specialized areas of knowledge. Topics offered may include health care, aging, mental health, and children and families.

The course will introduce students to social work research methods.  Students will explore how to formulate problem statements, develop hypotheses, utilize measures and scales, design research studies and interpret results.  The course will focus on identifying evidence-based practices to meet the needs of specific target populations.  Guidance will be offered on identifying relevant research and evaluating its scientific rigor.  The course will also highlight ethical issues in conducting social work research.  Pre-requisite MAT 175.

This course is the first of three professional practice courses designed to focus on the strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems. The course prepares majors to engage individuals in appropriate working relationships by identifying issues, needs, strengths, and resources; by collecting and assessing information; by planning interventions; and by delivering services. Admission to the Social Work Program required.

This course is the second in a three-course generalist practice sequence that focuses on strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems in relation to their broader environment. The course prepares students to engage families and groups in an appropriate working relationship, identify issues, problems, needs, resources, and assets; collect and assess information; and plan for service delivery. It also includes identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals and promote social and economic justice. Admission to the Social Work Program required.

This course is one of three professional practice courses designed to focus on strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems. The course prepares majors to engage macro systems, such as organizations, neighborhoods, communities, and governments, in appropriate working relationships by identifying issues, needs, strengths, and resources; by collecting and assessing information; by planning interventions; and by delivering services. Admission to the Social Work Program required.
 

This course prepares students for the practicum learning experience. Students will be assisted in the selection of a social work field placement and in the completion of the application and interview process. Students review social work knowledge, skills, and values related to generalist social work practice in a field agency setting. Admission to the Social Work Program required.  Permission required.

The Social Work Field Experience is the integral component of social work education and is anchored in the mission, goals, and objectives of the social work program. A minimum of 430 hours of entry level generalist social work experience under the supervision of a professional social worker in an appropriate social agency is required. This experience will reinforce the student’s identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the profession; foster the integration of empirical and practice-based knowledge; and promote the development of professional competence. Admission to the Social Work Program required. All social work major courses and prerequisites must be completed prior to enrollment.  Also requires approval of the Social Work Program Director and the Director of Field Education. Field fee assessed.  Co-requisite: SWK 491.

Students meet weekly for a 3-hour integrative field seminar designed to assist them in applying empirically based social work theory, knowledge and professional ethics in a social work practice setting and provide a capstone experience. Students complete an evaluation of practice research project in which they apply in their field settings research skills obtained through the social work curriculum. Written assignments are provided to demonstrate integration of knowledge and practice.  All social work major courses and prerequisites must be completed prior to enrollment. Also requires approval of the Social Work Program Director and the Director of Field Education. Co-requisite: SWK 490.

In conjunction with a social work faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of social work faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. Prerequisite: SWK-390.
 

In conjunction with a social work faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Prerequisite: SWK-390. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission. May be repeated for credit for a total of six semester hours.

Contact Information
Melinda Campbell
Interim Dean, School of Education, Health and Human Sciences; Professor of Exercise and Sports Science
140 Martin Hall
campbellm@meredith.edu
(919) 760-8309