A study of basic accounting principles, accounting cycle, and preparation, interpretation, and analysis of financial statements. Not recommended for first semester freshmen.

The analysis of financial data for managerial decision making;  interpretation of accounting data for planning and controlling business activities. Prerequisite: ACC-220.

A study of the technical aspects of accounting, basic accounting procedures, accounting cycle, and business transactions. Use of special journals and subsidiary ledgers, standard setting, professional ethics, and an introduction to the use of computerized accounting software.

The development of corporate financial accounting theory and its application to in-depth problems of financial statement account valuation, analysis of working capital, and determination of net income. Also included is a study of the development of accounting concepts and principles. Prerequisite: ACC-220 with a C or better or with instructor’s permission.

A continuation of ACC-330, featuring topics such as income measurement and valuation issues related to plant assets, short and long-term liabilities, stockholders’ equity and dilutive securities. Related professional literature will be analyzed. Prerequisite: ACC-330 with a C or better.

The analysis of cost factors and their relationships to production, emphasizing cost procedures and information systems; standard costs and variance analysis.  Prerequisite: ACC-221.

A comprehensive interpretation and application of the federal income tax code as it pertains to the determination of taxable income and computation of tax liability for individuals. Prerequisite: ACC-220.

A comprehensive interpretation, analysis, and application of the federal income tax code as it pertains to the determination of taxable income and tax liability for corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts.  Prerequisite: ACC-336.

A variety of subjects related to current issues and professional accounting standards. Prerequisite: ACC-220. May repeat different topics for credit.

A study of auditing theory, practices, and procedures encompassing audit objectives, standards, evidence, internal control, professional ethics, and legal responsibility. Related materials of professional importance will be used.  Prerequisite: ACC-330.

An in-depth endeavor that complements and enhances classroom learning.  It is an active participation by students and faculty in the creation, discovery, and examination of knowledge through various methods of inquiry and analysis within the various disciplines of accounting. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as expectations of business faculty.  Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only.

An in-depth endeavor that complements and enhances classroom learning.  It is an active participation by students and faculty in the creation, discovery, and examination of knowledge through various methods of inquiry and analysis within the various disciplines of business.  It represents a study or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an intellectual contribution to business.  Junior or senior standing only.  May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six credit hours.

An introduction to business concepts, how they apply in daily life, and how they can be used to prepare for a career.  Topics include leadership and motivation, entrepreneurship, personal financial planning, basic economic and accounting principles, marketing and ethics. Open to freshmen only.

The managerial use of statistical concepts and methods to address real world business problems. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of quantitative methods as applied to business decision making and operations. Applications of technology for data analysis and management will be included as an integral part.  Prerequisites: 3 credits in  ACC/BUS/ECO recommended/and one math course – must be MAT-175 or an equivalent statistics course.

An analysis of individual and work group characteristics and those organizational factors which allow an organization to be managed more effectively. Topics include management theory and function, motivation and reward systems, and leadership practice, with a major emphasis on business ethics and ethical decision-making. Not open to freshmen.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the vocabulary needed to understand information systems, and the skills necessary to use such systems to support business activities. The course also explores how information technology helps to achieve competitive advantage and improve decision making across business processes. Features of spreadsheets, databases, and other appropriate software will be used. Prerequisites: 6 hours of ACC/BUS courses. Not open to freshmen.

A course for innovation and change leadership of a business or nonprofit venture. Students will explore the impact of business on society, and how to develop a socially responsible organization that attempts to address market needs and/or solve complex societal problems. During the course, students will be exposed to a variety of resources and guest presentations from local economic development agencies and business owners who will assist in idea formulation for individualized product development. Students will learn how to lead change, build relationships, and motivate others in relation to developing a business concept. This class is experiential and experimental, where student assessment will center on participation and venture development. The course may also be offered in coordination with a venture development competition.

A course for the development of viable business models with specific attention to financial and legal organization at the state and federal level. The purpose of the class is to understand the challenges and opportunities related to the launch and first two years of operation. Statistically speaking, most small businesses fail within the first two years of operation with chances of long-term success rising significantly after 24 months. This course is intended to determine appropriate launch strategies while considering a two year strategic operating plan. The course is exploratory and experiential where students must engage in an individualized business development process in a meaningful way. Prerequisite: BUS-306

A study of the policies, institutions, and practices of international business and trade, with emphasis on the global integration of the United States' economy; international commercial and financial practices; international marketing and management techniques; differences in the cultural environment and customary business methods; and the role of multinational corporations. Prerequisites: BUS-303; ECO-100.

A study of the policies, institutions, and practices of international business and trade, with emphasis on the similarities and differences between US and business practices in another country; international marketing and management techniques; differences in the cultural environment and customary business methods; and the role of multinational corporations. This course involves international travel as part of an approved study abroad program. Prerequisites: BUS 303; and ECO 100. Fulfills requirements of BUS 310 International Business or may be counted as a business elective for students who have already taken BUS 310. Co-requisite: BUS 315

A study of the culture and economy of another country; the impact of the political and social environment on doing business; an investigation of the differences in the cultural environment and customary business methods; and an examination of the role of the government in the business system. This course involves international travel as part of an approved study abroad program. Prerequisite: BUS 303; and ECO 100 Co-requisite: BUS 314

An examination of the legal and regulatory environment of business, including ethics and the place of law in society. Not open to freshmen.

The management of operation systems in both goods manufacturing and service producing industries. Topics included are trade-off analysis, process analysis, workplace methods, production and inventory control systems, capacity planning, operations strategies, technology-driven information systems, information technology management, and decision support systems. This course makes extensive use of case studies in operations management. . Prerequisites: ACC 220, BUS 250 or MAT-175; BUS 303, ECO 101.

An examination of the principles, practices, and underlying theories of human resource management in relation to employee selection, training,  motivation, and remuneration; interpersonal and group relationships; manpower planning. Prerequisite: BUS-303. Not open to freshman.

A study of the principles of training and development, training needs, assessment, training solutions to organizational problems, skill training, different training options, and ways of integrating new behavior and attitudes into the organizational system. Prerequisite: BUS-350. Not open to freshmen.

An introduction to the principles, institutions, and techniques associated with the development, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and services from the producer to the consumer.  Not open to freshmen.

A study of the impact of such factors as  personality, motivation, perception, learning, attitudes, cultural and social influences, and life-style changes on buying behavior.  A review of sociological, psychological, and economic models of behavior will be included. Prerequisite: BUS-360.

An examination of the social media marketing tools that can be used to engage with customers through integrated marketing communications channels.  This course provides the knowledge and insights required to establish objectives and strategies, properly select and integrate social media platforms to engage consumers, and monitor and measure the results of these efforts.  Topics will also explore the integration of other digital marketing tools such as search engine optimization, business-to-business digital marketing, and mobile marketing.

An examination and application of the process of planning a research project, gathering and analyzing secondary and primary data, and reporting (in writing and orally) the results for decision-making purposes.  Applicable to those interested in social and behavioral sciences as well as business.  Prerequisites: BUS-360, and (BUS-250 or MAT-175, or MAT-248).

A study of the principles of optimal financial policy in the acquisition and management of funds by the profit maximizing firm; the application of theory to financial decisions involving cash flows, capital structure, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ACC-221, ECO-101, and (BUS-250 or MAT-175 or MAT-248).

Supervised employment which provides students the opportunity to gain practical, professional experience in conjunction with their academic development.  Limited to junior or senior majors in the School of Business with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0.  May be repeated for credit up to a  maximum of 8 hours, of which only 3 credits may count toward a major in Business Administration. May not be taken simultaneously with BUS-480,  BUS-481, COE-302 or COE-403.  Credit toward the Business Administration major will not be given for both BUS-380 and BUS-480.  Pass/fail grading only. Instructor's consent required.

A course focused on special topics in business. Topics will be chosen in accordance with faculty expertise. The course may include domestic travel in which enrolled students will be required to participate. A description of the topic, travel requirements and costs will be included in the registration schedule of the upcoming semester. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Only 3 credit hours can count as elective credit in the Business Administration major. Prerequisite or corequisite: 6 hours of ACC/BUS/ECO.

A course for the management of entrepreneurial operations, networks, and systems. This course examines how entrepreneurs effectively develop human resource strategies and control processes for emerging businesses. Entrepreneurs need to develop basic systems and processes for their businesses and interact with external networks. Entrepreneurs often experience legal issues relative to the launch and growth of their ventures. Students learn to apply these legal issues to new and growing ventures and explore long-term goals and decision-making. In addition, family business development, mergers and acquisitions, and succession planning are components of the course. The course is exploratory and experiential where students must engage in an individualized business development process in a meaningful way. Prerequisites: BUS 306

In this course, students are managing the Meredith Student Investment Fund. Students will develop the statement of investment, establish investment strategy for the Fund, do stock pitches and make investment decisions. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of three times. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite or corequisite: BUS 370.

A study of the principles of compensation and benefits, job analysis and job evaluation, market surveys and their effects on pay structure, performance pay and incentives, benefits, services, and the comparable worth issue. Prerequisite: BUS-350.

An examination of critical staffing activities including job analysis, job descriptions, performance measurement, recruitment and selection, employment and termination.  The primary focus will be on enhancing organizational performance through strategic planning of the recruitment and retention processes.  An emphasis on economic volatility and how to adapt employment practices to demographics, competition demands, and changes made by legislation.  Considerable use of HR metrics and quantitative analysis of HR functions. Prerequisite: BUS-350.

A study of the principles of recruiting, selection, and retention of employees and the laws that pertain to them in the workplace, including the employer-employee relationship, discrimination, affirmative action, and government regulation. Prerequisite/Corequisite: BUS 350. Not open to freshmen.

An analysis of professional selling practices with emphasis on the selling process and sales management.  It will include the foundations of selling, the selling process, the difference in selling to organizational customers and to the ultimate customer, and the management of the sales function. Students will be required to make several presentations. Prerequisite: BUS-360.

An examination of the creative process, from strategy to execution, of advertising and promotional materials.  Students will be required to develop the strategies, media plans, and draft executions of advertising and promotion materials. Prerequisite: BUS-360.

An in-depth study of the applications of theory to financial decisions involving optimal capital structure, capital budgeting criteria, and long- and short-term financing. Prerequisite: BUS-370.

A study of the theory and practice of portfolio management; analysis of securities; risk evaluation; alternative investment opportunities; and optimizing behavior of the individual investor. Prerequisites: ACC-220; ECO-100 or 101; BUS-250 or MAT-175; BUS-370 or ECO-312 or ACC-330.

Supervised experience in business, nonprofits, or governmental institutions where work is related to any business functional area of organization.  Limited to students with a declared major in Business Administration.  May not be taken simultaneously with either COE-302, COE-403 or any other internship course in the School of Business curriculum. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: 15 hours of BUS, ACC or ECO courses.

Supervised experience in business, nonprofits, or governmental institutions where work is related to Human Resource Management.  Limited to students with a declared major in Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resource Management.  May not be taken simultaneously with either COE-302, COE-403 or any other internship course in the School of Business curriculum. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: BUS 350 and 12 hours of BUS, ACC or ECO courses.

Supervised experience in business, nonprofits, or governmental institutions where work is related to Marketing.  Limited to students with a declared major in Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing.  May not be taken simultaneously with either COE-302, COE-403 or any other internship course in the School of Business curriculum. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite

Supervised experience in business, nonprofits, or governmental institutions where work is related to Accounting.  Limited to students with a declared major in Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting.  May not be taken simultaneously with either COE-302, COE-403 or any other internship course in the School of Business curriculum. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: ACC-330 and 12 hours of BUS, ACC or ECO courses.

Work experience of at least 120 hours in an organization where the student gains professional knowledge and skills related to business administration. Students are advised to seek approval of employment plans before starting work. After the experiential learning has been completed, students must submit documentation of the experience. Open only to Business Administration majors.

A culminating experience that provides students an opportunity to integrate material across the HR field through hands-on consulting-focused projects.  The major project is an HR audit, which reviews regulatory compliance and strategic alignment of an organization’s HR policies and procedures.  Students will identify and communicate significant HR issues, and generate HR policies and procedures to resolve them.  Additional projects will further student understanding of HRM consulting from a systems perspective.  Prerequisite: BUS-350 and 6 hours of HR concentration courses.

An in-depth study of managerial policy formulation, strategies, and problems, including the influence of economic, social, and governmental factors. Must have senior standing. Prerequisites: BUS-303, BUS-360, BUS-370; BUS-343 is a prerequisite or a corequisite.

An in-depth endeavor that complements and enhances classroom learning. It is an active participation by students and faculty in the creation, discovery, and examination of knowledge through various methods of inquiry and analysis within the various disciplines of business.  The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as expectations of business faculty.  Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only.

An in-depth endeavor that complements and enhances classroom learning.  It is an active participation by students and faculty in the creation, discovery, and examination of knowledge through various methods of inquiry and analysis within the various disciplines of business.  It represents a  study or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an intellectual contribution to business.  Junior or senior standing only.  May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six credit hours.

This course explores communication between global corporate leaders and their various constituents. Topics include leadership principles, international cultural considerations, groups and team dynamics, organizational theory, attitudes and work motivation. Both written and oral communication concepts will be explored.

This course explores the application of management and organizational behavior theories for enhancement of individual, team and organizational effectiveness. The course further examines the ethical implications of business decision-making.

The fundamentals of economic analysis on a national level with an emphasis on the interconnected global economy.  Topics include: economic growth, the business cycle, unemployment, the price system, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade and finance, and the impact of international events and policies on the domestic economy.

A study of market structures, profit maximization, consumer demand, resource demand and pricing, resource allocation, and consumer responsiveness to price changes.

An analysis of consumer decision making in the marketplace; government protection for the consumer; consumer credit institutions; insurance, investments, management of personal finances, retirement and estate planning.  No credit given in the major for business, or economics.  Also offered as FCS-274.

A continuation of study begun in ECO-101, this course proceeds to intermediate-level analysis of markets for goods and services, consumer behavior, price and product choices by business, markets for labor and other resources, and the various ways that the structure of markets affects the welfare of society. Prerequisite: ECO-101.

A continuation of study begun in ECO-100, this course proceeds to intermediate level analysis of national income and employment determination, theories of economic growth and fluctuation, techniques and problems of monetary and fiscal policies to achieve macroeconomic goals of full employment, price stability, economic growth, and balance of payment equilibrium, and international issues. Pre-requisite: ECO-100.

The microeconomic analysis of society's pursuit of sustainable environmental outcomes, using both the private (market) tools and public (government) policies.  Market solutions are often inefficient with respect to the natural environment, and this course examines the ways that governments may enhance both the efficiency and equity with which environmental/ecological resources are utilized. Attention is given to topics such as global climate change, acid rain, ozone, wilderness preservation wetlands, biodiversity, and water quality.  Topics also include Natural Resource management, in particular forestry and ocean fisheries.  An examination on “best practices” in management of natural resources, and the ways governments can improve outcomes for present and future generations using tools such as effluent taxes, benefit-cost analysis, camp-and-trade policies, public ownership of resources, best technology requirements, and input taxes.  Prerequisites: ECO-101 or permission of instruction. (ECO-100 and a course in statistics are highly recommended.)

A study of contemporary monetary theory and policy, including an examination of the value and purchasing power of money; the role of commercial banks; the central banking system and its monetary controls; and the relationship among prices, production, employment, and economic growth. Prerequisites: ECO-100, ECO-101 is recommended.

An examination of the economic consequences of the shift of women into the labor force and the changing roles of men and women. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisite: ECO 101

This course applies the tools of economic analysis to the health care services industry.  Issues to be studied include demand and supply for medical care, health insurance markets, government health care programs, medical malpractice, competition versus regulation, and national health care reform. Prerequisite: ECO-101 or permission of instructor.

A study of the foundations of international trade theory; development of international economic policies; foreign exchange and payments systems; and international institutions supporting trade, with special emphasis on the role of multinational corporations and common markets. Prerequisites: ECO-100, ECO-101 is recommended.

Supervised experience in business, nonprofits, or governmental institutions where work is related to economic analysis.  Limited to students with a declared major in Economics.  May not be taken simultaneously with either COE-302, COE-403 or any other internship course in the School of Business curriculum. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: 12 hours of ECO courses.

Joint participation by students and faculty in the discovery, examination, and analysis of knowledge in economics.  The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as expectations of economics faculty.  Open to seniors in the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs only.

Joint participation by students and faculty in the discovery, examination and analysis of knowledge in economics. Open to juniors and seniors with a declared major, minor, or concentration in economics. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six credit hours.

Principles of human nutrition applied to meet the health and nutrition needs at different stages of the life cycle.  This course will cover cognitive and physiologic changes that impact nutrient needs throughout the human lifespan.  Students will begin exploring nutrition for preconception, pregnancy, and lactation, then go on to examine nutrition during infancy, toddler/preschool ages, school-age childhood, preadolescence, and adolescence.  Students will end the course looking at nutrition during aging adulthood and considering nutrition during end of life care.  Prerequisite: FN 227

This course explores traditional cultural foods from around the world for the purpose of increasing cultural competency and effective communication with others.  Foodways include but are not limited to how food is selected, prepared, and consumed.  Flavor profiles and commonly used ingredients and dishes will be studied.  Students will examine their own food culture, biases, and how these impact personal and professional interactions with others.  Sensory experiences including tastings will expose students to a variety of flavor profiles allowing students to compare and contrast flavors.  Prerequisites: FN 227.

Introduction to dietary interventions focused on the treatment of common diet- and food- related health ailments.  Course topics and learning objectives will correspond to applied menu planning and hands-on food preparation complementary to the management of these health conditions.  Dietary approaches and interventions based on scientific research will be examined.  Lab fee assessed.  Prerequisite: FN 124/126.

A critical exploration of food systems and health disparities from local, regional, and international perspectives.  A special emphasis on determinants of health for underserved populations as well as nutrition services provided to the public through various agencies and organizations.  Concepts on community food security, food sovereignty, food justice, and agricultural sustainability are presented and discussed, as well as frameworks and community-based strategies to improve food security and address health outcomes.  Prerequisite: FN 227, FN 251. 

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills necessary to lead and manage hospitality and tourism organizations, with a key focus on best practices in aspects of social responsibility within the hospitality and tourism industries.  It will include food service, lodging, travel and tourism, and highlight various management and career opportunities in the hospitality and tourism industries.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles of event management, in the context of the various functions involved in the critical aspects of event planning.  Key management issues will be covered.  Recent trends and the future of event planning will be discussed.

This course is an overview of the growth, trends, organizational structure and economics of the hotel business.  The emphasis of the course will be an examination of the technical operations integral to hotel and resort management.  Areas of study will include: hotel and resort operations, front office operations, housekeeping, marketing, human resources, and guest services.  The different models of and the structure of hotels and resorts will be explored including contracts and agreements.  Discussion of the role of the general manager and related functions will be explored. Prerequisite: HOS 300

A course focused on special topics in hospitality and tourism. Topics will be chosen in accordance with faculty expertise. The course may include domestic travel in which enrolled students will be required to participate. A description of the topic, travel requirements and costs will be included in the registration schedule of the upcoming semester. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Only 3 credit hours can count as elective credit in the Hospitality and Tourism Management or Business Administration major. Prerequisite: HOS 300.

This course provides a theoretical base of knowledge that will enable students to methodically and effectively manage special events.  Topics will include understanding the importance that special events, entertainment, meetings and other events have on this industry.  The significance of how these events cross international and cultural boundaries, and how they represent an opportunity to increase revenues and touch the customer will be explored.  Virtual events and other growth and future trends will be discussed.  Prerequisite: HOS-320.

Supervised experience in business, nonprofits or governmental institutions where work is related to Hospitality and Tourism.  Limited to students with a declared major in Hospitality and Tourism  Management.  May not be taken simultaneously with either COE-302, COE-403 or any other internship course in the School of Business curriculum.  Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisites: HOS 300  Not open to freshmen.

This course integrates the material gained from the hospitality and tourism program culminating in a capstone course which will provide students with a perspective of managing a hospitality and/or tourism business through strategic eyes, and utilizing the tools and techniques of strategic management in developing and implementing sound hospitality and tourism strategies.  Prerequisites: BUS-303 and HOS-300.  Prerequisite or corequisite: HOS-360.

Contact Information
Office of the School of Business
Harris 111
(919)760-8415
nkdicker@meredith.edu
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