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An introduction to the field of TESL, focusing on the methods and materials of teaching various language skills and knowledge areas. Attention will be given to the integrated teaching of all skills within a communicative setting. Field experiences required.

A broad view of second language acquisition and literacy from both psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives.  Includes current theories of second language acquisition, the relationship between first and second language acquisition and literacy development, the influence of culture on language and literacy development, teaching and assessment implications for the classroom and home.  Field experiences required.

A study of the basic concepts of intercultural communication, including a comparison of American cultural orientations with those of other countries. A look at how these cultural differences relate to language teaching and learning. Field experiences required.

A course focusing on the particular needs of K-12 teacher: historical and legal background of bilingual and ESL education, assessment and placement of ESL learners, literacy development, content-based instruction and the adaptation of curricular materials. Field experiences required.

A look at language as a system with particular focus on teaching English as a Second Language to students in public schools grades K-12. Considers teaching implications of English grammar, phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Field experiences required.

This course explores major theories and models for understanding how children and adolescents learn; seeks to understand the complex interaction among biological, sociocultural, and psychological factors that influence learning; applies this knowledge about learning to learning and teaching in schools; and investigates the interplay between school culture and students' cultures and the implications for student achievement. The course begins with a sharp focus on the students as an individual learner, then centers on the individual working with a teacher, and finally centers on the learner in cultural context. Explanations of structural barriers to student achievement are examined including stereotype threat, curriculum-home communication mismatch, the privileging of certain approaches to learning, and solutions for teachers are investigated. The importance of close observation of children/adolescents and careful consideration of actual student achievement data in sociocultural context are stressed. Field experiences required.

One challenge that teachers face is how to work with a broad range of cultural, linguistic, and intellectual differences among their students. This course will examine differences and similarities among students and explore sociocultural and structural influences on student achievement. It will address the questions, “Who are the students in the classroom?” and “What must teachers consider when planning and implementing instruction for all of their students?”  The course will focus on basic concepts related to addressing student needs through differentiation, inclusion, and teaching English as a Second Language. Field experiences required.
 

This course is designed to give teachers the knowledge and skills to create and maintain effective learning environments. One important aspect of classroom management, behavior management, will be given particular focus. Teachers will understand how to implement positive behavior support (PBS) to help their students learn and engage in appropriate behavior. Field experiences required. 

This course helps teachers analyze the complex historical, cultural, sociological, philosophical, and theoretical perspectives which impact schools. It examines the educational process in the context of modern society and how that process is influenced by the forces of the larger community. Participants will reflect on and examine the human dynamics associated with motivation, various theories of leadership, the mentor/mentee relationship and career/professional development.  Recognizing the teacher as a leader within a professional community is an important component of the course. This course helps answer the questions, “how do schools work,” “how did we get here,” and “where are we going and how do we get there?”  Field experiences required. 
 

This course will critically examine the role of technology in the K-12 classroom and incorporate the basic technology tools of teachers, their application and the ethics associated with the profession Field experiences required. 

This course provides an overview of various exceptionalities and the services offered in special education. The course is intended to give the student a foundation of knowledge about the nature and needs of children with special needs, and introduces the student to causes and characteristics of specific disabilities, service delivery models, historical and current issues, legislation, research, trends, and controversies in special education. Field experiences required.
 

The purpose of the course is to develop the instructional competencies of school personnel to effectively teach students with persistent reading problems as well as to select and implement comprehensive reading programs within their schools. Although the focus of this course is on students who have shown persistent problems learning to read (especially those students identified as having special education needs who are participating in regular classrooms), the information is also appropriate for individuals interested in developing early intervention programs Field Experiences required.
 

This course is designed to introduce candidates to the knowledge, skills and procedures needed to provide effective instruction for students with persistent mathematical difficulties.  The principles, techniques, methods, and strategies presented in this class are based on research-validated instructional strategies. The class will provide candidates an understanding of what it takes to build an individualized mathematics instructional program that will have a direct impact on the academic performance of their students. Credit is given to the NCSIP II grant for content and procedure. Field experiences required. 
 

The expectations for professionals who work in schools and other education settings are changing dramatically. Although most educators enter the field because of their commitment to work with students, few can be successful unless they refine their skills for interacting with other professionals and families. Educators routinely participate in team meetings and collaborative problem solving activities in a variety of settings in which their ability to effectively communicate is critical. This course is designed to assist candidates in building their collaborative skills, developing skills for effectively participating in difficult interactions, and is intended to help candidates attain the knowledge and skills to be leaders in collaborative efforts in schools. Field experiences required.  
 

This course examines models for teaching learning strategies, metacognitive strategies guiding the learning of content, for students with mild/moderate disabilities in grades K-12. Students will examine educational research on the application of literacy and learning strategies in the content areas and will learn ways to assess students' understandings and to use the assessment to plan for instruction. Field experiences required.
 

This course provides candidates with a broad knowledge and understanding of a wide range of legal issues concerning providing special education services to students with disabilities. Students will have a foundation in effective and efficient assessment and evaluative practices, including standardized and curriculum-based assessment. Field experiences required. Pre-requisite: EDUG 710.
 

This course will examine the theory, research and instructional practices essential to developing mathematical understanding at the primary level in the elementary school. Experiences in this course will focus on helping children develop a sound, foundational understanding of early number concepts, language and skills. Candidates will learn to assess children's mathematical understanding and plan engaging, meaningful learning experiences that lead to success for all learners. Prospective teachers will use culturally-relevant contexts such as children's literature, science, social studies, and the arts to engage children in mathematics. A practicum offers opportunities to apply concepts and skills learned in the course. 
 

This course will examine the theory, research and instructional practices essential to developing mathematical understanding of concepts and skills found in the intermediate elementary grades mathematics curriculum.  Experiences in this course will focus on helping children develop a sound, foundational understanding of the concepts, language and skills in the areas of numeration, algebraic thinking, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Candidate will learn to assess children's mathematical understanding and plan engaging, meaningful learning experiences that lead to success for all learners. Prospective teachers will use culturally-relevant contexts such as children's literature, science, social studies, and the arts to engage the students in mathematics. A practicum offers opportunities to apply content and skills learned in this course. 

This course explores the nature, processes, and products of science and health with an emphasis on content, methods, and curriculum appropriate for teaching in elementary school. This course is designed to assist prospective K-6 teachers in developing competencies for teaching elementary school science and health. Emphasis is placed on content, methods, and curriculum appropriate for teaching in grades K-6. Understanding and application of concepts, methodology, and educational theory will be fostered through classroom field experiences. Field experiences required.
 

Prospective elementary teachers will become familiar with the pedagogical principles of the four arts disciplines as they develop and implement learning experiences that meet curriculum objectives in both social studies and the fine arts. Field experiences required.
 

This course will examine the theory, research and instructional practices essential to literacy development K-6.  Candidates will learn to integrate children’s literature, writing and reading instruction into a total program of balanced early literacy instruction which is culturally sustaining and developmentally appropriate for K-6 students.  Candidates will learn to use multiple models and approaches for assessing literacy learning and plan lessons that meet the needs of diverse learners.  Field experiences required.

The goal of this course is to assist teachers in developing the writing skills and processes of K-12 students in diverse classrooms, including but not limited to English Language Learners and students with disabilities.  At the conclusion of the course, students will show familiarity with current theories; plan and implement tiered interventions for writing; apply a variety of assessment tools for the purpose of data collection and analysis; teach and interpret student work and assessments in an equity framework; and integrate technology in the writing process.  Students from across specialty areas will apply this knowledge within the MTSS decision-making model.  Field experiences required.   

Designed to provide a full-time experience at the appropriate grade level within the area of specialization. Internships are offered in the areas of Elementary Education (K-6), English as a Second Language (K-12), or Special Education (K-12).  The candidate engages in a variety of supervised instructional activities, with gradual induction into full-time teaching responsibilities. The candidate will be supervised by both a cooperating teacher in a public school classroom and a college supervisor from the Meredith faculty.All program requirements must be met prior to enrollment. Co-requisites: EDUG-795. Fee assessed. 
 

A capstone seminar taken concurrently with the graduate internship. This course is designed to strengthen the professional skills of reflection as related to instructional practice, assessment and evaluation of student learning, and analysis of personal and effective classroom practices. Emphasis is placed on the five areas of the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards. Pass/Fail. Fee Assessed.  Co-requisites: EDUG-790.
 

A study of effective instruction in health and physical education for K-12 students focusing on specific teaching skills critical to enhancing student engagement and learning. Course content includes creating a respectful learning environment, classroom management, assessment and evaluation, diversity, professionalism and ethics. Students will have the opportunity for examination and critical analysis of effective teaching research.

A study of curriculum development in health and physical education focusing on current theories and models including factors affecting the curriculum:  standards, scope, sequence, scheduling, implementation plan, curriculum theories, program assessment and evaluation techniques

Course offers prospective physical education teachers experience in instructional methodology appropriate at the elementary level. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis of theory and practice in physical education at the elementary level and understanding the role of physical education in the development of children. Content includes curriculum design, planning and implementing units and lessons, teaching approaches, assessment and evaluation appropriate at the elementary school level. Also incorporated are adapted physical education teaching approaches, assessment and evaluation appropriate for individuals with special needs. Research which supports the most effective teaching practices will be included (15 clinical hours in public schools are required for this course).  

Study of teaching methods, resources, materials and strategies as related to general secondary school teaching and specific physical education content area teaching. Students will examine how to create and implement lesson plans and units of study within the scope of secondary school curricula, which will promote meaningful learning environments and promotion of 21st century skills for K-12 students.  Study of designing and implementing appropriate movement experiences for students with disabilities also emphasized.  Research that supports the most effective teaching practices will be examined. (15 clinical hours in public schools are required in this course).

Course provides application of current K-12 school health instruction with emphasis upon curriculum design, Instructional strategies, lesson planning, health literacy, use of appropriate assessments and reflective practices. Additional focus on health content in a multidisciplinary approach within a school setting, exploring community involvement and an increased awareness on global diversity. (15 clinical hours in public schools are required for this course).

Thank you for your Interest!

You can connect with a graduate admissions counselor in a variety of ways—choose the one that’s most convenient for you. We look forward to hearing from you!

Valencia Hicks-Harris
vphicksharris@meredith.edu
(919) 760-8316


Strong Story | Larissa Byrant

After graduating with her MAT, Larissa Bryant, ’13, was well prepared to become a teacher and to have a positive impact on her students’ future.


After graduating with her MAT, Larissa Bryant, ’13, was well prepared to become a teacher and to have a positive impact on her students’ future.

Contact Information  
207 Ledford Hall
(919) 760-8316
gradeducation@meredith.edu
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