Fundamental concepts of chemistry, emphasizing stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, and chemical bonding.  Three class hours per week.  High school chemistry or  CHE-100 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course. Corequisites: CHE-141. Students must pass CHE-111 with a C or better in order for it to fulfill the prerequisite requirement for CHE-112.

A continuation of fundamental concepts with emphasis on kinetics, equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, and descriptive chemistry. Three class hours per week.  Prerequisites: CHE-111 with a grade of C or better, CHE-141. Corequisite: CHE-142.  Students must pass CHE-112 with a C or better in order to fulfill the prerequisite requirement for other courses in the department.

Laboratory experiments designed to supplement the work in CHE-111. Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: CHE-111.

Laboratory experiments designed to supplement the work in CHE-112 including qualitative and quantitative analysis.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-111/141. Corequisite: CHE-112.

This course will provide exposure to professions related to the life sciences, physical sciences and environmental sustainability. Using student identified Strengths from StrengthsQuest, students will develop the professional skill sets to start a career path in various science and sustainability fields. Employment opportunities at all levels (technician, field specialist, human resources, sales, marketing, education, writing, advocacy, management, coordinator, etc.) in nonprofit, government, academic, and private sector industries will be discussed.  Also offered as BIO-201.

Essential principles, reaction mechanisms,  structures and stereochemistry of carbon compounds.  Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-111 with a grade of C or better, CHE-141, CHE-112 with a grade of C or better, CHE-142.  Corequisite: CHE-241.

A continuation of CHE-221, emphasizing reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and physical methods of structure determination. Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-221/241. Corequisite: CHE-242.

This course will study the sources, reactions, transport, and effects of chemical species in the atmosphere, soil, and water. The major 76 anthropogenic pollutants and their effects on the environment will also be studied. Prerequisites: CHE 111/141 with a grade of C or better.

Experimental techniques in synthesis and reactions of organic compounds.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-111/112, CHE-112/142. Corequisite: CHE-221.

Experimental organic chemistry with emphasis on qualitative analysis of organic compounds using chemical tests and instrumental analysis. Three laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: CHE-222.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original laboratory research. Students will submit their findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to spend two to three hours per week in the laboratory and one to two hours per week outside the laboratory for each semester hour credit. CHE-111 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course.  Course may be repeated for credit for a maximum of three semester hours. Also offered as PHY-299 and GEO-299.

A study of the principles and techniques of chemical analysis including volumetric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and electroanalytic methods.  Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: CHE-112 with a grade of C or better.

Instrumental analysis covers the theory and methods for the separation, identification and quantitation of chemical species known as analytes in chemical samples. Students will explore the basic tools and language of analytical chemistry and the current trends in analytical instrumentation. The theory and application of spectrophotometric, chromatographic and other instrumental techniques will be explored with an emphasis placed on sample preparation. Students taking the course will be challenged to identify and quantify unknown analytes present in a sample. The course includes three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE-112 and CHE-221.

Special topics in chemistry such as instrumental analysis, advanced organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, industrial chemistry, or chemometrics. Instructor's consent required.

A study of the states of matter, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, and reaction rates.  Three lectures per week.  Prerequisites: CHE-112 with a grade of C or better, MAT-181 or MAT-191 with a grade of C or better, and PHY-207 or PHY 211.

A study of the modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, and spectroscopy. Also offered as PHY-430. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHE-112 with a grade of C or better, MAT-212 with a grade of C or better, and PHY-208 or PHY 212.

A study of the chemistry of biological systems including metabolic interrelationships, reaction rates, control mechanisms, and integration of these reactions within the structural framework of the cell.  Also offered as BIO-436.  Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241.

The second part of a 2-part course in Biochemistry, this advanced course is designed to prepare students for graduate study and careers in the fields of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. The course will present topics in modern Biochemistry including bio-molecular structure, enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, biosynthesis of bio-molecules, and culminate with a discussion of special topics such as cellular signal transduction. Three lectures per week. Also offered as BIO-438. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE- 112/142, CHE-221/241, CHE-222/242, -BIO/CHE-436.

Laboratory experiments in thermochemistry, equilibria, and kinetics with emphasis on mathematical treatment of data and technical report writing. Corequisite: CHE-420.

Laboratory experiments to accompany the theoretical studies of atomic and molecular structure, and chemical bonding and spectroscopy in CHE-430. Corequisite: CHE-430.

A collection of laboratory exercises designed to provide practical exposure to some of the general principles and methodology of biochemistry. Techniques include photometry, polarimetry, electrophoresis, centrifugation, and various chromatographic techniques.  Also offered as  BIO-446.  Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO-110/151, BIO-251, CHE-111/141, CHE-112/142, CHE-221/241. 
Corequisite: CHE-437.
 

A study of advanced concepts of theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry with relevant biochemical examples.  CHE-222 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course. Prerequisites: CHE-221/241.

This course consolidates the knowledge of chemistry acquired through coursework and provides a bridge to students' post-graduation experience. Students will explore current trends in the field through discussion with peers, written assignments, and oral presentations. Familiarity with chemical research literature and real-world applications of chemistry will be a major focus of the course. Performance will be evaluated based on quality of participation, assignments, and one major presentation. Through reading and discussion, students will not only learn of potential career applications of the Meredith experience, but also prepare to effectively communicate in the professional arena. May be taken for credit more than one semester.

Open to senior chemistry majors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the chemistry faculty. Prerequisite: CHE-299 or instructor approval.

Open to junior and senior chemistry majors or others by permission.  In conjunction with a  faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A  research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of three semester hours. Prerequisite: CHE-299 or instructor approval.

An introduction to the atmospheric, hydrologic, and geologic processes by which the physical environment of our planet is continuously reshaped and reformed.  With corequisite lab counts as a laboratory science for general education requirements. Corequisite: GEO-240.

This course provides students with the experience of finding and analyzing a variety of geographically referenced data, and then presenting them in graphical and statistical formats in order to answer research questions from everyday life.  This process will include spatial reasoning, problem definition, and appropriate applications for planning and decision-making.

A systematic survey of major world regions with emphasis on climates, land forms, resources and economics.  Also includes discussions on political ties and position in world trade. Counts as a social science elective for general education requirements.

An introduction to the nature, origin,  processes and dynamics of the atmosphere that result in weather variability and climate change and their impact on human activity. Knowledge of algebra required, but a calculator is not required. Prerequisites: One laboratory science course (BIO-110/151, CHE-111/141, GEO-200/240, or PHY-211/241).

Field and laboratory exercises involving the atmospheric, hydrologic, and geologic processes by which the physical environment of our planet is continuously reshaped and reformed. One full-day field trip is required. A lab fee covers the field trip cost. With corequisite course counts as a laboratory science for general education requirements. Corequisite: GE0-200.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original laboratory research. Students will submit their findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to spend two to three hours per week in the laboratory and one to two hours per week outside the laboratory for each semester hour credit. GEO-200 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite to this course. May be repeated for a total of three credit hours.  Also offered as CHE-299 and PHY-299.

This course is an introduction to the inter-relationships among the physical, chemical, and biological processes and the large variety of resources of the physical world. Consequences from natural phenomena and, increasingly, human activities that use various resources, give rise to a number of environmental problems.  Potential solutions to these problems will be discussed. Prerequisites: CHE-111/141 or GEO-200/240.

Open to students in the department of Chemistry, Geoscience and Physics who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. In conjunction with a faculty mentor,  the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the students and the faculty mentor are required to complete registration. The project must meet the Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the departmental faculty. Prerequisite: GEO-200/240 or GEO-203.

Open to junior and senior geoscience minors or others by permission. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation.  A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of three semester hours. Prerequisite: GEO-200.

A study for the non-science major of the fundamental principles of physical science with emphasis on their relevant applications. This course may not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements.

This course is designed to introduce students to the science of astronomy and its importance as an influence on our view of human-kind.  Topics include the history of astronomy, the motion of celestial objects, models of the solar system, comparative planetology, stars, and life in the universe. Conceptual comprehension of basic astronomy is reinforced through student-guided class discussions, group problem solving, and student presentation. A strong background in algebra is required for this course.  

This is a first semester general physics course. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, gravitation, momentum, and energy with emphasis on applications in the biomedical field. Prerequisite: a course in pre-calculus, including algebra and trigonometry, or equivalent. Corequisite: PHY-241.

This is the second half of a two-semester general physics sequence. Topics include fluids, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity, and magnetism with emphasis on application in the biomedical field. Prerequisites: PHY-207/241. Corequisite: PHY-242.

This is a first-semester calculus-based general physics course. Topics include mechanics, kinematics, vectors, forces, Newton's Laws of Motion, gravitation, work, energy, momentum, and conservation laws. Problem solving is an essential part of the course. Classroom engagement activities are used to enhance problem-solving skills and to guide students toward a coherent comprehension of physics. High school physics is strongly recommended as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: A C or better in MAT-181 or MAT-191. Corequisite: PHY-241.

This is the second half of a two-semester calculus-based general physics sequence. Topics include fluids, oscillatory motion, waves, sound, optics, electrostatics, electricity, and magnetism. Problem solving is an essential part of the course. Conceptual understanding is reinforced through interactive classroom activities, including group problem solving and discussion questions. Prerequisite: PHY 211 with a Grade of C or permission of instructor, PHY241. Corequisite: PHY-242.

This course involves experimental studies in mechanics, kinematics, gravitation, forces, momentum, and energy. The laboratory develops skills with basic sensors and measurement of physical quantities. Students work in small groups to record numerical data, assess measurement uncertainty, discuss concepts, and interpret results. Lab reports are assigned to help develop skills in scientific writing and communication. Corequisite: PHY-207 or PHY-211.

This course involves experimental studies in fluids, oscillatory motion, sound, basic electricity, electron charge, and optics. The laboratory develops skills with basic sensors and measurement of physical quantities. Students work in small groups to record numerical data, assess measurement uncertainty, discuss concepts, and interpret results. Lab reports are assigned to help develop skills in scientific writing and communication. Corequisite: PHY 208 or PHY-212.

This course will provide opportunities for freshmen and sophomores to participate in original laboratory research. Students will submit their findings in a formal written report and will give an oral presentation. Students will be expected to spend two to three hours per week in the laboratory and one to two hours per week outside the laboratory for each semester hour credit. PHY-211 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite for this course. Course may be repeated for a total of three hours credit. Also offered as CHE-299 and GEO-299.

A study of the modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding and spectroscopy. Also offered as CHE-430. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHE-112/142, PHY-212/242, (MAT-181 or MAT-191).

Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the students and faculty mentor are required to complete registration. The project must meet the Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the departmental faculty. Prerequisite: PHY-212/242.

Open to junior and senior science or mathematics majors or others by permission. In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute an original research project that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. A research proposal form completed by the student and the faculty mentor is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for a total of three semester hours. 

A course for students seeking teacher licensure in science [6-9] or comprehensive licensure in [9-12].  Students are introduced to the specific methods used in science teaching.  Both the theoretical and the practical aspects of teaching science in the middle and secondary schools are stressed. Information on safety practices is given. Emphasis is placed on the importance of demonstration and laboratory work in science classes, on effective use of technology, on understanding and making effective use of objectives, and on individualizing science instruction.


Curriculum requirements and course descriptions are subject to changes with each catalogue.

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Contact Information
Walda Powell
Head, Dept. of Chemistry, Physics, & Geoscience
203 Science/Mathematics Bldg.
(919) 760-8754
powellw@meredith.edu
Chemistry Physics & Geoscience Department »
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