Enroll@MC / Courses for First Year Students

Courses specific to major,  and pre-professional fields included below.

FYE-100, First Year Experience

Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in FYE-100, a one-credit class taught by a variety of faculty and staff across campus. This class infuses StrongPoints™ areas of academic, experiential, financial literacy, and career planning to help students make a successful transition into college.

Topics covered include:

  • Skills and strategies for academic success
  • Major selection and career exploration
  • Communicating with professors and academic dialogue
  • Opportunites for cocurricular involvement
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Diversity
  • Budgeting and personal finance

Because the class is small and interactive, it also provides a support group for new students as well as the chance to develop a strong relationship with a faculty or staff member.


Courses Specific to Major

First year students interested in these majors typical enroll in these courses.

ACCOUNTING

 

  • BUS 150, Business and Society
  • ECO 100, Principles of Macroeconomics or ECO 101, Principles of Microeconomics
  • Students with strong quantitative skills may consider enrolling in ACC 220, Financial Accounting in the spring of their freshman year.
  • The appropriate mathematics course, based on recommendation, should be taken during the first year. If the student is qualified, MAT 175, Statistics I, is recommended.

ART

Three majors are offered: studio art, graphic design and art education.
 

  • ART 101, Drawing I, and/or ART 110, 2-D Design Concepts, Color and Composition or ART 111, 3d Design Concepts and Structure
  • ART 221, Survey Western Art: Ancient Early Renaissance

Students interested in art education are encouraged to contact the Art Department to discuss specific requirements. ART 101 and ART 110 are recommended in the first semester.

BIOLOGY

 

  • BIO 110/151, Principles of Biology with Lab*
  • MAT 180 & 181 or MAT 191, Calculus I. If the student does not feel prepared for calculus, she should discuss the appropriate math with her faculty adviser during orientation.
  • CHE 111/141, General Chemistry I with Lab if interested in healthcare/health sciences. If the student has not been recommended for MAT 170 or higher, she should consider postponing CHE 111 until she has completed MAT 170 or its equivalent.

*Indicates course must be taken during the first year

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Students majoring in business administration may focus on an area by obtaining a minor or a concentration.  A concentration is offered in human resources, and minors are available in the following areas: accounting, economics, finance, human resource management, international business, management, and marketing. 

  • BUS 150, Business and Society
  • ECO 100, Principles of Macroeconomics or ECO 101, Principles of Microeconomics
  • The appropriate mathematics course, based on recommendation, should be taken during the first year. If the student is qualified, MAT 175, Statistics I, is recommended.

CHEMISTRY

  • CHE 111/141, General Chemistry I with Lab.
  • MAT 170, Trigonometry, MAT 181 Integrated Pre-Calculus/Calculus, or MAT 191, Calculus I

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

 

  • CD 234, Preschool Child (and lab, CD 234L), PSY 100, Introduction to Psychology, or FCS 290 Foundations in Family and Consumer Sciences.

COMMUNICATION

 

  • COM 100, Introduction to Communication Studies
  • COM 225, Public Speaking or COM 260, Interpersonal Communication

COMPUTER SCIENCE

 

  • CS 101, Beginning Programming
  • CS 140, Databases (1 hr course)
  • CS 156, Web Site Design and Management
  • If pursuing the Bachelor of Science, MAT 191, Calculus I; MAT 212, Calculus II; or MAT 213, Calculus III—the highest level for which the student is prepared.
  • If pursuing the Bachelor of Arts, MAT 175, Statistics I; MAT 248, Statistical Concepts and Methods for Mathematicians; or MAT 191, Calculus I.
  • If pursuing the Bachelor of Science take PHY 211/241, General Physics I with Lab first semester of the freshman or sophomore year.  MAT 191, Calculus I or MAT 181 Integrated Precalculus/Calculus B is required prior to taking physics.

CRIMINOLOGY

 

  • SOC 230, Principles of Sociology
  • SOC 231, Social Problems

DANCE STUDIES

 

  • DAN 160, Perspectives in Dance (fall, 2 credits)
  • DAN 159, Improvisation (spring)
  • Two courses in Dance Technique—Ballet, Modern, Jazz or World Dance
  • DAN 252, Participation in Choreographic Project (unless pursuing K-12 License in Dance)

ECONOMICS

 

  • ECO 100, Principles of Macroeconomics or ECO 101, Principles of Microeconomics
  • The appropriate mathematics course, based on recommendation, should be taken during the first year. If the student is qualified, MAT 175, Statistics I, is recommended.

EDUCATION

Students will major in the academic area of their choice and complete the North Carolina Licensure program in one of the following areas:

  • Birth through kindergarten (B–K)
  • Elementary education (grades K–6)
  • Middle grades education (grades 6–9): English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies
  • Secondary education (grades 9–12): English, mathematics, comprehensive science and social studies
  • Special subject area education (grades K–12): art, music, dance, theatre, Spanish, and health and physical education
  • Career and technical education (grades 7–12): family and consumer sciences education

Students interested in the North Carolina Licensure program may enroll in professional education courses during their sophomore year.  Freshmen should alert their advisors to their interest in licensure and enroll in general education courses and/or major courses that complement their licensure program.  Specific options could include:

  • The appropriate mathematics course, based on recommendation  and licensure
  • BIO 105/145, Modern Biological Concepts and Lab; BIO 110/151, Principles of Biology and Lab; or GEO 200/241, Earth Science and Lab. Chemistry should not be taken if pursuing K-6 licensure, unless choosing a science major

ENGINEERING DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM

Students enrolled in the Engineering Dual Degree Program simultaneously complete a Bachelor of Arts from Meredith (chemistry or math) and a Bachelor of Science from NCSU in one of the corresponding engineering specialties. Students interested in pursuing the Engineering Dual Degree Program must complete the Engineering Dual Degree Program Declaration of Intent. All students eligible for the program begin taking a prescribed set of courses in fall of their freshmen year.  For questions, please contact Dr. Liz Wolfinger.

ENGLISH

 

  • ENG 111, Principles of Writing

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

 

  • BIO 105/145, Modern Biological Concepts and Lab; CHE 111/141, General Chemistry and Lab; or GEO 200/240, Earth Science and Lab
  • MAT 175, Statistics I

EXERCISE & SPORT SCIENCE

Students may choose from two areas of concentration in exercise and sports science:  Health and Physical Education with K-12 licensure or Health and Wellness.

Course recommendations for first year:

  • HED 210, Risk, Appraisal & Prevention in Health (fall)
  • ESS 200, Foundations of Physical Education, Sport and Fitness (spring) are optional courses for freshman.
  • ESS 221, Principles of Strength Training & Conditioning (fall)
  • ESS 225 Leadership in Physical Activity (fall)
  • Lab science

Students interested in Health and Physical Education with K-12 licensure should take at least 16 hours.

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

  • FCS 290, Foundations in Family and Consumer Sciences
  • FN 124, Principles of Food; FN 227, Introductory Nutrition; or CD 234, Development of the Young Child

FASHION MERCHANDISING & DESIGN

Two concentrations are offered for the fashion merchandising and design major: merchandising or design.

First semester students interested in the merchandisng concentration may enroll in:

  • FCS 290, Foundations in Family and Consumer Sciences
  • FMD 114, Apparel Merchandising
  • ECO 101, Principles of Microeconomics
  • FMD 213, Clothing and Society

First semester students interested in the design concentration may enroll in:

  • FCS 290, Foundations in Family and Consumer Sciences
  • FMD 114, Apparel Merchandising
  • FMD 115, Principles of Clothing Construction
  • ART 101, Drawing I

FOOD & NUTRITION

First semester students interested in food and nutrition as a major may enroll in:

  • FN 124/126, Principles of Food with Lab
  • BIO 110/151, Principles of Biology with Lab
  • CHE 111/141, General Chemistry I with Lab
  • FN 227, Introductory Nutrition

FOREIGN LANGUAGES & LITERATURES

First semester students interested in Spanish as a major should enroll in the next level of language based on the results of the language placement test.  Results will be given to students by their faculty adviser at Enroll@MC.

HISTORY, INTERNATIONAL STUDIES & POLITICAL SCIENCE

First semester students interested in a major in history or political science should consider the following introductory courses:

  • HIS 101, Emergence of Western Civilization; HIS 102, Modern Western Civilization; or HIS 103, The World in the 20th Century
  • HIS 214, American History to 1876
  • HIS 215, American History Since 1876
  • POL 100, American Political Systems

Students with background and interest in International Studies can consider HIS 103, The World in the 20th Century. Students with experience and interest in Model United Nations (POL 370) should contact Dr. Jeffrey Martinson.

INTERIOR DESIGN

First semester students interested in interior design as a major should enroll in:

  • ID 142, History of Architectural Interiors and Furnishings
  • ART 101, Drawing I or ART 110, 2-D Design Concepts, Color and Composition.
  • FCS 290, Foundations in Family and Consumer Sciences

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

See History, International Studies and Political Science

MATHEMATICS

First semester students interested in mathematics as a major should enroll in:

  • MAT 191, Calculus I; MAT 212, Calculus II; or MAT 213, Calculus III—the highest level for which the student is prepared. If the student does not feel prepared for these courses, she should take the appropriate math, based on recommendation.
  • If pursuing the Bachelor of Science, consider taking CS 101, Beginning Programming.
  • Students should also plan to take MAT 248 Statistical Concepts and Methods for Mathematicians during the spring of their freshmen year.

MUSIC

Two different degrees are offered for music majors:

  • The Bachelor of Arts in music is intended for the student who is interested in music as part of a total liberal arts program, for the student who wishes to focus on a major area of performance, or for the student who may plan graduate study in musicology, music history or composition.
  • The Bachelor of Music, Music Education leads to K-12 teacher licensure in music.

Both the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Music in Music Education have strong performance components. First semester students interested in music as a major should enroll in:*

  • MUS 101, Elementary Theory & Composition
  • MUS 151, Elementary Ear Training
  • Ensemble—Chorale (by audition) or Sinfonietta
  • Principal Applied Music Course—in the instrument of your choice
  • MUS 140, Elementary Keyboard
  • Secondary Applied Music Course—piano for non-piano students— students with piano as principal applied study may take secondary applied study in a later semester.

*Total course load should be limited to no more than 18 hours (16–17 preferred). 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

See History, International Studies and Political Science

PSYCHOLOGY

First semester students interested in psychology as a major should enroll in:

  • PSY 100, Introduction to Psychology

Students with AP credit for Introduction to Psychology may enroll in:

  • PSY 210, Life Span Developmental Psychology
  • PSY 310, Psychology of Children and Adolescents
  • PSY 320, Abnormal Psychology
  • PSY 342, Autism Practicum

PUBLIC HEALTH

First semester students interested in public health as a major may enroll in:

  • BIO 110/151, Principles of Biology and Lab
  • MAT 175, Statistics I
  • PHS 101, Introduction to Public Health
  • POL 203, Contemporary American Politics and Policy

RELIGIOUS & ETHICAL STUDIES

First semester students interested in religious and ethical studies as a major may enroll in:

  • RES 102, World Religions; RES 103, Biblical Literature and History; RES 104, Religious Ethics and Social Issues

SOCIAL WORK

First semester students interested in social work as a major may enroll in:

  • SWK 100, Introduction to Social Work & Social Welfare

SOCIOLOGY

First semester students interested in sociology as a major may enroll in:

  • SOC 230, Principles of Sociology
  • SOC 231, Social Problems

SPANISH

See Foreign Languages and Literatures

THEATRE

The department offers a major in theatre and a North Carolina teaching licensure, grades K–12, in theatre. Students interested in theatre as a major should enroll in the following courses during their first year:

  • THE 114, Introduction to Theatre (fall)
  • THE 224, Acting (spring) (prerequisite: THE 114)

Additional theatre courses may be taken with the permission of the department head or instructor.

UNDECIDED FIRST SEMESTER STUDENTS

Undecided first semester students will take either ENG 111 or math (based on placement) and continue in foreign language. They are encouraged by advisors to use general education requirements to explore areas of interest and possible majors.


Pre-Professional Fields of Study

You may plan an academic program that prepares you for further study in a professional or graduate program in one of the following areas.  Your faculty advisor and/or Academic & Career Planning can assist you with further planning resources.

HEALTH FIELDS

Students interested in health-related fields are encouraged to choose a major based on their interests and abilities. Many students interested in the health professions pursue a major in a natural science to complete the science courses generally required by health professions schools. Specific requirements for medical, dental and veterinary schools vary, so students should consult with advisors in these areas in their first year. Students interested in careers in health care should contact Dr. Karthik Aghoram or Dr. Francie Cuffney.

LAW

A student interested in becoming a lawyer or paralegal can major in almost any field, but she should choose courses which develop her abilities to write clearly, read critically and reason carefully. Students are encouraged to take POL 301 (Constitution and Rights of Americans) in the fall of their sophomore year, and should meet with Meredith’s pre-law advisor. Students interested in a law career should contact Whitney Manzo.


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