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Human Environmental Sciences Department

Contact Information:

Deborah Tippett
205 Martin Hall
Phone: (919) 760-8325
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Department Courses

CD-234 - Development of the Young Child
A study of the behavior and development of young children two through eight years of age. Students will participate in the care, guidance, and education of a group of young children in an early childhood classroom. Content includes major developmental theories and research applications. Students are to register for a separate off campus practicum (sections as 234L). Three hours of lecture and three hours of practicum each week.


CD-299 - Introduction to Research in Child Development
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and questions in Child Development. This course will provide an introduction to research methods in social science and child development. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: CD-234.


CD-334 - Infant Development
This course will provide the theoretical foundations of infant-toddler development as students examine the current research on the growth and development of very young children from a multidisciplinary perspective. Students will participate concurrently in a field experience in a program serving infants and toddlers. Three hours of lecture and three hours of practica each week. Prerequisite: CD-234.


CD-335 - Families and Close Relationships
A functional course designed to help the students achieve an understanding of various family structures and interpersonal dynamics. Students will examine theories of family structure, of family function, and of interpersonal and close relationships that can be applied to their personal and professional lives.


CD-340 - Developing Relationships and Learning Environments
This course emphasizes strong teacher-child relationships as a foundation for child development in all domains. Students will learn and practice positive interaction strategies to promote young children's development and learning. The course also focuses on how interactions with peers and the structure and organization of indoor and outdoor environments influence the development and learning of children. Students will learn to support and facilitate children's play as the major context for development and learning, create inclusive indoor and outdoor environments, and meet diverse individual needs through sensitive interactions and environmental design. Weekly field experiences required. Prerequisite: CD-234.


CD-345 - Curriculum for Young Children
Students will design and implement activities that integrate multiple developmental areas and levels of ability that are in accordance with the guidelines of developmentally appropriate practice. Placements will be in preschool programs that provide services for typically and atypically developing children. Instructor's consent required. Course fee assessed. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, and BK-337.


CD-404 - Families in a Global Context
This course will analyze the needs of families from a global perspective. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the family in various cultures. Major trends that affect families worldwide will be examined. Students will use action research and/or cooperative problem solving to address the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.


CD-434 - Infant Curriculum
Methods of developing, implementing, and evaluating curriculum experiences which are developmentally based for both typical and atypical infants and toddlers will be addressed. Program issues that relate to the needs of infants and toddlers and their families will be examined. Three hours of field experiences per week. Instructor's consent required. Course fee assessed. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340.


CD-436 - Administration of Programs for Young Children
A study of administration and the role of leadership in programs serving young children. Primarily through project and portfolio work, students will demonstrate competency in understanding the role of developmental theory in establishing and developing programs; the practical needs of programs in terms of staffing, financial management, licensing, environmental design, equipping and furnishing classrooms; working with parents and governing boards; and assessment and development of teaching staff. Health, safety, and nutritional concerns will also be addressed. May be taken without prerequisite course with permission from the instructor. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340.


CD-438 - Supporting & Strengthening Families
An overview of current information related to working with families of young children. Family and social systems theories and research provide a foundation for an ecological transactional view of families of diverse structural and sociocultural backgrounds. The emphasis of the course is on providing family-centered services that support and strengthen the family unit. Field experiences required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, and BK-337.


CD-440 - Readings in Early Education and Early Intervention
This course will trace the history and supporting theoretical bases of early education and early childhood special education in the United States. Models of early education and early intervention will be examined from a national perspective. Current trends and legislation at the state and national level will also be investigated. Program models designed to serve the needs of economically disadvantaged and at-risk children and families will be a focus of examination. Observations of programs that exemplify different models will be conducted during the semester.


CD-450 - Advanced Practicum & Seminar
Supervised student teaching will provide an in-depth opportunity for students to plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction for young children. Student teaching is co-supervised by a cooperating classroom teacher and a member of the Child Development faculty. In addition to 300 contact hours spent in the classroom, students will meet weekly to discuss, analyze, and evaluate their field experiences. Students need to have four consecutive days when they can participate in the classroom on a full-time basis. Course fee assessed. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, BK-337, CD-340, CD-345, and BK-445.


CD-498 - Honors Thesis in Child Development
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the child development faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.


CD-499 - Research in Child Development
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research project investigating topics and questions in Child Development. This course will provide an introduction to research methods in social science and child development. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, BK-337.


BK-337 - Observation of Young Children
The history, philosophy, and practice of observing, documenting, and analyzing children's behavior within an ecological framework will be presented. Specific observational techniques to assess adult-child and child-child interactions, assessment of play, and environmental assessment will be presented. Students will develop an assessment portfolio for individual children. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, PSY-210 or PSY-310.


BK-341 - Variations in Early Development
An examination of biological and environmental factors and their interactions as they impact the development of young children, and may interfere with typical growth and development. The effects of various risk factors, developmental delays or disabilities on patterns of development in the physical, cognitive, language, social-emotional, and adaptive domains will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on low-incidence disabilities. Field experiences required. Prerequisites: PSY-210, or PSY-310, PSY-312, CD-234. Prerequisite or corequisite: CD-340.


BK-342 - Seminar: Meeting Individual Needs
This seminar gives students the opportunity to investigate current professional literature and integrate content from multiple courses and field experiences focused on meeting a wide variety of individual needs in early childhood environments. Student-led discussions will focus on applying principles of universal design, inclusion, and developmentally appropriate accommodations for children with disabilities and delays. Students will be introduced to Individualized Education Programs and will practice developing appropriate goals and objectives for children. Prerequisites: PSY-210 or PSY-310, PSY-312, CD-234, CD-334. Prerequisite or corequisite: CD-340. Corequisite: BK-341.


BK-350 - Emergent Literary and Technology Integration
This course focuses on the development of reading and writing processes from birth through kindergarten and how technology can be integrated across the curriculum. This course gives students a deeper understanding of the theory, research and recommended practices behind emergent literacy, focusing on the development of reading and writing. Students will develop an initial electronic teaching portfolio and will conduct literacy and technology activities in inclusive preschool and kindergarten settings. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, BK-337 and CD-345.


BK-445 - Advanced Curriculum Development
This course will focus on the application of developmental theory to curriculum planning and developmentally appropriate practice; on linking assessment and curriculum planning; and on adapting and evaluating curriculum to promote the inclusion of young children of various developmental abilities. Students will examine the underlying theory related to the development of an integrated curriculum for young children and the various strategies that can be employed to develop a comprehensive curriculum. Specific ideas and strategies for planning and implementation will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of practicum each week. Prerequisites: BK-337, CD-345.


BK-460 - Clinical Internship: Infants/Toddlers
Supervised clinical internship with infants and toddlers under the direction of a cooperating teacher with faculty supervision. Full-time teaching assignments with weekly seminars. Course fee assessed. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, CD-345, CD-434, BK-337, BK-341, BK-342. Corequisites: BK-465, CD-434.


BK-465 - Teaming and Collaboration
This seminar will introduce students to the function of interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary teams and the primary disciplines involved in the delivery of services to young children and their families. The role of the professional in assessment, planning, intervention, and case management will be examined as will the mechanisms whereby these services are coordinated, and the strategies for implementing interdisciplinary, and multi-disciplinary and transdisciplinary programs. Issues related to ethics and professional conduct will be discussed. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: CD-234, CD-334, CD-340, CD-345, CD-434, CD-438, BK-337, BK-341, BK-342.


BK-469 - Teaching and Leading
In this professional seminar, students will explore the role of teacher as leader and advocate by examining current research and recommended practice in BK teaching and leading. Topics will include professional learning communities, Recognition and Response (Response to Intervention for early childhood), preventing overrepresentation of racially diverse students in early intervention, working with children and families who are English language learners, issues in BK curriculum, service-learning with young children, using digital technology, and career paths in birth-kindergarten. In collaboration with the instructor, cooperating teachers and principals, students will select readings, lead discussions and host the seminar one time each in their students teaching sites. In addition, students will construct and lead a service-learning project with their pupils, and will lead one professional discussion or activity with the faculty in their schools. Students will reflect on their teaching and leadership. Corequisite: EDU-490.


FCS-274 - Consumer Economics
An analysis of consumer decision making in the marketplace; government protection for the consumer; consumer credit institutions; insurance, investments, management of personal finances, retirement and estate planning. No credit given in major for accounting, business, or economics. Also offered as ECO-274.


FCS-290 - Foundations in Family and Consumer Sciences
Historical and theoretical perspectives, and current trends in various disciplines in Human Environmental Sciences are explored. Students will be provided with the foundation to apply human systems theory and life course development to their area of specialization in Child Development, Family and Consumer Sciences, Fashion Merchandising and Design, and Interior Design.


FCS-299 - Introduction to Research in Family & Consumers Science
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and problems in Family and Consumer Sciences. This course will provide an introduction to the methods and techniques of the discipline. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required.


FCS-355 - Family Resource Management
The use of human resources to promote individual and family development. Emphasis on family life management skills from a woman's perspective.


FCS-424 - Professional Perspectives in FCS
Investigation of historic development, interdisciplinary nature, integrative approach, and ethical perspectives of Family and Consumer Sciences field of study; introduction to professional opportunities within business, education, research, and service agencies; formulation of individual career plan.


FCS-425 - FCS Practicum
Provides a culminating experience for Family & Consumer Sciences majors seeking careers in business and community services. The internship is selected by the student through career analysis, and is conducted in cooperation with an approved internship sponsor. The student must work 150 hours total over the course of the semester in an approved site. Prerequisite: FCS-424.


FCS-498 - Honors Thesis in Family and Consumer Sciences
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the family and consumer sciences faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.


FCS-499 - Research in Family & Consumer Sciences
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research or creative project exploring topics and problems in Family and Consumer Sciences. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: FCS-355.


FCS-764 - Methods of Teaching Family & Consumer Sciences
A study of planning, implementing, and evaluating family and consumer sciences programs. Emphasis on identifying needs of learners, writing objectives, planning lessons, using a variety of teaching/learning strategies, and assessing effectiveness. Required for secondary family and consumer sciences licensure students and food and nutrition majors.


FCS-765 - Family & Consumer Sciences Education
A survey of the curriculum for secondary family and consumer sciences education. Includes a program philosophy, organization, needs assessment, advisory committees, curriculum development, vocational student organizations [FCCLA], and legislation. Includes field experience. Required of secondary family and consumer sciences education majors.


FMD-114 - Apparel Merchandising
A study of the operations involved in the production and merchandising of apparel including fashion dynamics and product life cycle.


FMD-115 - Principles of Clothing Construction
The practical application of basic construction techniques including pattern alterations and analysis of quality construction in ready-to-wear. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory each week.


FMD-212 - Visual Merchandising
A study of promotional techniques used in successful retail operations. Emphasis is placed on merchandise display, fashion show production, and floor space layout.


FMD-213 - Clothing and Society
The study of the social and psychological aspects of clothing in our society today. The meaning of clothes in specific social situations, cultural contexts of dress, clothing as a form of nonverbal communications, and individual thought processes about clothing and appearance are studied.


FMD-227 - Flat Pattern
Basic principles and methods used in garment structure and design with emphasis on flat pattern. Prerequisite: FMD-115 with C grade or better.


FMD-299 - Introduction to Research in FMD
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating issues and problems in clothing and fashion merchandising. This course will provide an introduction to the methods and techniques of the discipline. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: FMD-114.


FMD-315 - History of Costume
A study of the history of European and American costume in relation to religious, political, technological, and artistic movements from the Egyptian period [2700 B.C.] to the 20th century. Also offered as ART-315.


FMD-318 - Apparel Design Development
The application of technical, creative, and analytical skills in developing seasonal apparel lines. Emphasis will be placed on targeting market identification, selecting fabric and trimmings in relation to price determination, developing operation sheets, and budgeting seasonal collections. Prerequisites: FMD-114, FMD-115.


FMD-325 - Draping
A study of the principles of apparel design using the draping method. Emphasis on fit, design, appropriateness, and construction techniques. May be taken without prerequisite courses with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: FMD-115 with a grade of C or better.


FMD-327 - Fashion Sketching and Portfolio Development
Exploration of basic proportions of the various fashion figures with an emphasis on female market segment. Introduction of fashion sketching techniques using various media and professional materials to communicate original design ideas. Prerequisites: ART-101 with a grade of C or better; FMD-115 with a grade of C or better; and FMD-227 or FMD-325.


FMD-344 - Retail Merchandising
A study of retail operations including store management, buying procedures, retail organization, and merchandising mathematics. Includes laboratory application of retail functions.


FMD-418 - Textiles
A study of textile products from raw materials through manufacturing and finishing of fabrics. Emphasis on selection and care of textiles.


FMD-426 - Tailoring
Advanced techniques in garment selection, fitting, and construction. Analysis of custom and fusible methods of tailoring. One lecture and five hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisites: FMD-115 with a grade of C or better, FMD-227, and FMD-325.


FMD-428 - CAD Apparel Design
Applications of apparel design techniques utilizing the computer to facilitate the design process. Emphasis will be placed on original garments and textile designs. Students must have computer experience. Prerequisites: FMD-115 with a grade of C or better, and FMD-227 or FMD-325.


FMD-442 - Retail Buying
This course applies retail strategy and merchandising principles to the day-to-day activities and responsibilities of a retail buyer. Emphasis on customer identification, sales forecasting, merchandise budgeting, assortment planning, merchandise procurement, and vendor analysis. Prerequisite: FMD-344.


FMD-443 - Special Problems in Retailing
An in-depth study of problems which retailers are currently facing. Business environments are simulated for students to analyze, evaluate, and select alternative solutions which would best suit each firm studied. Recommendations will be submitted in the form of oral and written reports. Prerequisite: FMD-344.


FMD-495 - Senior Exhibition
As a group, senior design students will prepare and install an exhibition of their work or produce a fashion show featuring their own designs. Students are responsible for all aspects of their project including the promotion of the show or exhibit, labeling of items, securing models and/or dress forms, staging or set up, and hospitality arrangements. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in FMD-227, FMD-325, FMD-327, FMD-426, ART-101 and ART-110.


FMD-498 - Honors Thesis in Fashion Merchandising and Design
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the clothing and fashion merchandising faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.


FMD-499 - Research in Fashion Merchandising and Design
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research or creative project exploring issues and problems in Fashion Merchandising and Design. The research experience will culminate in a paper and presentation. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisites: FMD-114 and FMD-344.


FMD-419 - Professional Practices
This course will be a culminating experience for fashion majors. It will examine career opportunities in the fashion industry with specific emphasis on qualifications for each different job. It will examine professional etiquette, professional behavior, and best practices in the field. It will provide instruction for and the opportunity to compile a portfolio for the design OR merchandising student.


ID-142 - History of Architectural Interiors & Furnishings
A study of architectural interiors and furnishings from antiquity to present. Relationship of architecture, art, and furniture styles to interiors. Survey of contemporary furniture designers. Also offered as ART-142.


ID-144 - Interior Design I
An exploration of the basic elements and principles of interior design. Includes application of design principles to human environments. Emphasis on design solution, relevant to human needs. Introduction to architectural drawing. Six studio hours per week. Prerequsite or corequisite: ART-101 or ART-110. Also offered as ART-144.


ID-243 - Interior Design Visual Presentations
Continued development of architectural drafting skills using two and three dimensional drawings to visually communicate design solutions. Visual presentation skills including rendering will be developed. Exploration of traditional board presentations and digital presentations will be introduced. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ART-101 or ART-110. Studio fee assessed.


ID-244 - Interior Design II
Residential interior design studio. Included will be the solution of residential design problems, preparation of appropriate drawings and models, application of universal design principles and aging in place. Historic adaptation of residential spaces. Specifications of finishes, furnishings and equipment for residential interiors. Six studio hours each week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ART-101 or ART-110. Pre- or corequisite: ID-243. Studio fee assessed.


ID-245 - Housing Issues
Study of psychological, physiological, social, and environmental aspects of shelter. Included will be a study of the housing needs of elderly and handicapped; cross-cultural perspective of housing; ergonomics; historic preservation; energy efficiency; and government policies influencing housing.


ID-246 - Interior Design Products
In-depth study of materials and their appropriate application used in interior design; including flooring, window treatments, wall coverings and furniture. Quality, utilization and sustainability as factors in material selection are included. Calculations of materials for flooring, soft window treatments, upholstered furniture and wall covering installations are covered.


ID-248 - Technology Applications for Interior Design
Exploration of technology techniques and tools for Interior Design. Design software and internet exploration. Introduction of computer aided drafting and design. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243; Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-244.


ID-299 - Introduction to Research in Interior Design
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will participate in a research or creative project investigating topics and problems in Interior Design. This course will provide an introduction to the methods and techniques of the discipline. The research experience will culminate in a paper and/or presentation. Open to freshmen and sophomore majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: ID-144.


ID-342 - Special Problems in CADD
Application of advanced computer aided design for residential and commercial interiors. Further exploration of overlay design packages. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248. Studio fee assessed.


ID-343 - Construction Technology
Survey of residential and non-residential systems, building materials, traditional and sustainable construction methods, and custom millwork design. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ART-101 or ART-110. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-342. Studio fee assessed.


ID-344 - Interior Design III
Application of design solutions for commercial and residential interiors. Included will be exploration of sustainable materials, solving design problems for diverse populations, and the study of building codes. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ART-101 or ART-110. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-342. Studio fee assessed.


ID-348 - Interior Lighting Design
Exploration of light as a design element in interior design; lighting theory; emphasis on technical aspects of lighting; lighting calculations; lighting specification and installation. Studio problems with application to residential, office, hospitality, retail, and institutional settings. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ID-244, ID-248.


ID-443 - Professional Practices in Interior Design
Exploration of business principles and practices of interior design. Using ethical practice in design management students gain knowledge and application of basic business processes. Introduction to professional organizations and professional development and creating a portfolio are covered. Students must have senior standing to enroll. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ART-101 or ART-110. Prerequisite or corequisite: ID-342, ID-344.


ID-444 - Interior Design IV
Senior level design studio course exploring various design problems in complexity, size and scope. Emphasis is given to multi-use spaces. Research and related reading are included. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ID-342, ID-344, ART-101 or ART-110. Studio fee assessed.


ID-447 - Commercial Interior Design
Execution of creative and functional solutions for commercial interior design problems. Included will be study of space planning and specification of traditional and sustainable materials and furnishings for non-residential interiors. Lecture and six studio hours each week. Prerequisites: ID-144, ID-243, ID-244, ID-248, ID-342, ID-344, ART-101 or ART-110. Studio fee assessed.


ID-498 - Honors Thesis in Interior Design
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will formulate and execute a research project at an advanced level of complexity that will culminate in a paper and a presentation. The project must meet Honors Program thesis requirements as well as the expectations of the interior design faculty. A research proposal form completed by the student, faculty mentor, and Honors Program director is required for registration. Open to seniors who are members of the Honors and/or Teaching Fellows Programs.


ID-499 - Research in Interior Design
In conjunction with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and conduct a research or creative project exploring issues and problems in Interior Design. The research experience will culminate in a paper and/or presentation. Open to junior and senior majors and others by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit for a total of six credit hours. A research proposal form completed by the student and faculty mentor is required for registration. Instructor's consent required. Prerequisite: ID-244.