Program Overview / Course Descriptions


Master of Science in Nutrition Course Descriptions

FNG 610 – RESEARCH METHODS IN FOODS AND NUTRITION
Using the scientific method and elements of critical thinking, students will design and develop a research project to be conducted as part of their thesis or project hours. Appropriate evaluation and analyses will be applied to their proposal. Students will leave the course with a completed research proposal. 3 hours

FNG 611 – NUTRITION AND THE LIFECYCLE I
This course examines nutrition across the lifespan from both a biological and psychosocial perspective. The impact of nutrition in pregnancy,  lactation, and infancy through adolescence will be studied. Special reference to agencies offering nutrition services.  2 hours

FNG 612 – NUTRITION AND THE LIFECYCLE II
This course examines nutrition across the lifespan from both a biological and psychosocial perspective. The impact of nutrition in adulthood and older adults will be studied. Special reference to agencies offering nutrition services. 2 hours

FNG 613 – LIFECYCLE NUTRITION
This course examines nutrition across the lifespan from both a biological and psychosocial perspective. The impact of nutrition in pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence as well as adulthood and older adulthood will be studied. Influences on food choice will be discussed and assessments of how dietary patterns associate with positive and negative age-related health outcomes will be made. Special reference to agencies offering nutrition services to each of the life stages will be covered. 3 hours

FNG 614 – MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY, ASSESSMENT AND COUNSELING
FNG 614/615 are to provide a comprehensive study of the nutritional care process for graduate students seeking to obtain foundation knowledge and skills toward Didactic Program in Dietetics verification. Application and integration of biological, physiological, and chemical parameters influencing specific medical conditions will facilitate evaluation of nutritional etiology and support for disease processes. Assessment, development of appropriate evidence-based nutritional interventions, and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated into the courses. Case studies and hands-on experiential learning experiences in anthropometric assessment and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated as the focus of the courses. Functioning as a member of a care-team will be stressed. 4 hours.

FNG 615 – MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY, ASSESSMENT AND COUNSELING II
FNG 614/615 are to provide a culminating comprehensive study of the nutritional care process for graduate students seeking to obtain foundation knowledge and skills toward Didactic Program in Dietetics verification. Application and integration of biological, physiological, and chemical parameters influencing specific medical conditions will facilitate evaluation of nutritional etiology and support for disease processes. Assessment, development of appropriate evidence-based nutritional interventions, and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated into the courses. Case studies and hands-on experiential learning experiences in anthropometric assessment and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated as the focus of the courses. Functioning as a member of a care-team will be stressed. Prerequisites: FNG 614, 3 hours

FNG 617 – FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT I
Introduction to the use of food quality management skills in food service systems, including the application of quantity food production principles, with an emphasis on quality quantity food production, menu planning, food service equipment use, and facility design. Corequisites: FNG 611, FNG 618 (lab) 3 hours.

FNG 618 – FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT I LABORATORY
Laboratory experiments designed to apply food service production and management skills in quantity foo settings. This course is designated for Food and Nutrition majors to supplement work in FNG 617. Three laboratory hours per week. Lab fee assessed. Corequisite: FNG 611, FNG 617, 1 hour.

FNG 619 (8) – FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT II AND LAB
Applied investigation into the use of management resources in food service systems, fundamental management processes, concepts and principles to improve decision making and problem solving. Consideration of purchasing procedures, storage, methods of cost control, personnel, safety, and nutrition quality in food decisions. Laboratory experiences are required. Prerequisites: FNG 617 and FNG 618 4 hours.

FNG 620 – ADVANCED NUTRIENT METABOLISM I
A study of the role of carbohydrates, fiber, and lipids in human nutrition and biology. Mechanisms of absorption, digestion, functions, requirements, and intermediary metabolism in cells with emphasis on integration with other nutrients and systems. Clinical significance, current issues, and critical analysis of the research and professional literature. 2 hours

FNG 621 – ADVANCED NUTRIENT METABOLISM II
A study of the role of amino acids, protein, energy metabolism and food regulation in human nutrition and biology. Mechanisms of absorption, digestion, function, requirements, and intermediary metabolism in cells with emphasis on integration with other nutrients and systems. Clinical significance, current issues, and critical analysis of the research and professional literature. Pre-or Co-requisite: FNG 620, 2 hours

FNG 622 – ADVANCED NUTRIENT METABOLISM
The study of the role of carbohydrates, fiber, lipids and protein in human nutrition and metabolism. Mechanisms of absorption and digestion, functions, requirements, and intermediary metabolism in cells with emphasis on integration with other nutrients and systems,clinical significance and health outcomes.  3 hours.

FNG 625 – SEMINAR IN NUTRITION
A presentation-based course, the first part of the semester will be spent conducting a literature review on selected topics in the field. Students will develop oral presentations based on their literature review and will be required to develop and distribute a written abstract and bibliography on their topic. Co-requisite: FNG 610, 1 hour

FNG 627 – FOOD AND SOCIETY
Designed as a culminating experience in the program, this course is a critical examination of the social, political, economic and environmental influences on the American and global food system. Students will study the dominant and alternative methods for producing and distributing food to people, and the relationship between human health and the food supply. Students will propose solutions to problems involving the food system in a semester project. Prerequisites: FNG 610; FNG 611; FNG 620/621; FNG 625 (1hr); FNG 646. 3 hours

FNG 628 – NUTRITION AND FOOD POLICY
This course explores the layers of US food policy and the key events, people groups, and agencies that have shaped the current food system. Government agencies, corporations, trade associations, and social advocacy groups alike will be investigated to understand how the complex web of stakeholders come together to inform food policies with economic, social, and environmental impacts. The impacts of these factors will be discussed primarily in how they shift, acutely and over time, food availability, prices, and trends. Student will analyze and assess how the accumulation of food policy decisions, internationally to locally, impact health and nutritional status of individuals and communities. 3 hours

FNG 630 – NUTRITION EDUCATION AND COUNSELING
An interactive course with students developing, reviewing and implementing various forms of nutrition education targeted to specific population groups. Students will develop, implement and evaluate nutrition education materials. 3 hours

FNG 631 – NUTRITION EDUCATION
This course examines communication for nutrition education informal and informal settings. Theories in nutrition education will be highlighted; how to develop nutrition educational plans, goals, and objectives will be discussed; and assessment strategies will be used to analyze developed work. Specific strategies and techniques for implementing a variety of nutrition education lessons and programs and lessons will be practiced. Assessment and improving program effectiveness with closed loop practices will be included. 3 hours.

FNG 635 – GASTRONOMY
Study of the various factors that contribute to pleasurable dining will be studied. Sensory evaluation will be conducted. Students will reflect upon their own experiences with food and dining, and using critical and analytical thinking skills they will develop a greater awareness of food. Readings will be discussed in terms of their contribution to the understanding of a food and dining experience. 3 hours

FNG 636 – SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS
In examination of the relationships among diet, the various systems that produce our food, and the environment. Students will study the various agricultural and production methods and strategies for producing food, their impact on the natural environment, and sustainability. Students will connect personal dietary decisions to the broader social and global issues surrounding food, the environment, and health. 3 hours

FNG 646 – REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND OTHER MULTIVARIATE MODELS
This course begins with linear regression and building models for estimation and prediction in the biological sciences. The same concepts will be examined using multiple regression and residual analysis will be added. Topics also will include analysis of variance and covariance, basic concepts of experimental design, and ethical issues in data analysis and interpretation. Statistical software will be used. 3 hours

FNG 650 – VITAMINS, MINERALS, AND NUTRACEUTICALS
A study of the essential vitamins and minerals in humans, mechanisms of absorption, digestion, functions, requirements, metabolism, and current issues. A review of functional foods, phytochemicals, herbs, and other biologically active compounds in foods, and their relevance to the prevention and treatment of disease. Critical analysis of the research and professional literature. 3 hours

FNG 655 – NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE
A study of diet and nutrition needs and assessment of athletes and physically active people, and the factors affecting diet and nutritional status in this population. Nutrition facts and fallacies in sport nutrition, efficacy of supplements, engineered foods, and ergogenic aids for the enhancement of physical performance. 3 hours

FNG 656 – OBESITY AND WEIGHT MANAGEMENT
A comprehensive review of literature in the field of overweight/obesity and its health consequences in child and adult cohorts. Program, policy and position papers of organizations dealing with obesity will be evaluated. Strategies for weight management including diet, physical activity and behavior will be studied. Current research in treatment, pharmacological and surgical intervention. 3 hours

FNG 657 – FOOD AND NUTRITION COMMUNICATION
An examination of the various communication media available to the food and nutrition professional. This course will provide experience in writing and presenting food and nutrition information in different formats to lay and professional groups. Reliable sources of and disseminating nutrition information via social media are also discussed. 3 hours.

FNG 658 – CULTURAL FOOD PRACTICES
This course explores traditional culture foods from around the world for the purpose of increasing cultural competency and effective communication with clients and community members. Foodways include but are not limited to how food is selected, prepared, presented, and consumed. Flavor profiles and commonly used ingredients and dishes will be explored to begin to understand how and to what extent traditional foodways impact societies and cultural norms. Additionally, fusion cuisine will be explored to understand how one cultural cuisines can impact another and in turn be impacted by others in areas where people groups meet or as a result of global migration. Students will examine their own food culture, biases, and how these impact personal and professional interactions with others. Food tastings and sensory experiences will expose student to a variety of global cuisines allowing students to compare and contrast flavors. 3 hours.

FNG 660 – FOOD, FILM & CULTURE
Guided by social science theories, this course explores the connections between food and culture, as expressed through the media of film and writing, exploring the ways in which the use of food illuminates historical, sociocultural, and environmental influences on food choices of cultural groups. The aim of the course is to find out what food, as depicted in film and writing, tells us about our world, our communities, and ourselves. Field experiences at local marketsand foodservice establishments provide hands-on experience with cultural foods. 3 hours

FNG 670 – PRACTICUM IN NUTRITION
A supervised field experience with an organization, agency, business or other entity in the field of foods and nutrition or an applied project. Students will meet with a faculty supervisor to design a suitable field experience and establish measurable objectives and learning outcomes to be achieved at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisites: FNG 610; FNG 611 or FNG 612; FNG 620/621; FNG 625; FNG 646; and permission of graduate advisor, 3 hours.

FNG 675 – TOPICS IN FOODS, NUTRITION, AND DIETETICS
Advanced study of a variety of current, new, and/or controversial
topics in the field of foods, nutrition, and dietetics. Prerequisite: permission of graduate advisor, 1-3 hours

FNG 680– THESIS IN NUTRITION
Research in nutrition and dietetics directed by a graduate committee.
Prerequisites: FNG 610; FNG 611 or FNG 612; FNG 620/621; FN G 625 (1hr); FNG 646; and permission of graduate advisor, 6 hours (generally completed for 3 credits each in two consecutive semesters).

FNG 685 – CAPSTONE: FOOD STUDIES I
This course is the first in a two course sequence designed to represent a period of transition from the role of graduate student to that of professional. Capstone: Food Studies 1 prepares the student for their Capstone: Food Studies 2 field or research experience. With the guidance of FN faculty, students will explore their personal and career goals, identify a field experience or research project, and develop a literature review, and goals and objectives for their capstone experience. A major outcome for the course is a completed proposal and plan for their Capstone: Food Studies 2 experience. Prerequisite or Corequisite FNG 610, 3 hours.

FNG 686 – CAPSTONE: FOOD STUDIES II
This course is designed to represent a period of transition from the role of graduate student to that of professional. It provides an opportunity for the graduate student to put into practice the knowledge, skills and dispositions acquired through previous coursework. The student will clarify perceptions of themselves, their roles as professionals, and their strengths and weaknesses in fulfilling professional responsibilities and project development and task completion. Capstone experience can be community-based or research-based. Professional and personal growth is fostered by the assistance of a professional in the field (work site supervisor or research mentor) and a college faculty advisor. Prerequisite: FNG 685, 3 hours.

FNG 690 – CAPSTONE: DIETETICS
Clinical nutrition preparation for dietetic interns. This course provides the student with a review of and advanced training in medical nutrition therapy in the clinical arena of dietetics. Upon completion of the course, the entering intern will be prepared for the clinical dietetic internship experience. This course is taken in the final semester of the program. 3 hours.

FNG 800 – GRADUATE STUDY
Provides enrollment for students extending beyond FNG-686 Capstone: Food Studies 2 and/or taking written comprehensive examinations but not registered for another course. Maybe repeated as needed. 1 hour

Former course descriptions below:


FN-610 Research Methods in Foods and Nutrition (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
Using the scientific method and elements of critical thinking, students will design and develop a research project to be conducted as part of their thesis or project hours. Appropriate evaluation and analyses will be applied to their proposal. Students will leave the course with a completed research proposal.

FN-611 Nutrition and the Lifecycle I (2.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
This course examines nutrition across the lifespan from both a biological and psychosocial perspective. The impact of nutrition in pregnancy, lactation, and infancy through adolescence will be studied. Special reference to agencies offering nutrition services.

FN-612 Nutrition in the Lifecycle II (2.00 cr.)
Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year
This course examines nutrition across the lifespan from both a biological and psychosocial perspective. The impact of nutrition in adulthood and older adults will be studied. Special reference to agencies offering nutrition services.

FN -614 Medical Nutrition Therapy, Assessment, and Counseling I (4.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
FN-614/615 are to provide a comprehensive study of the nutritional care process for graduate students seeking to obtain foundation knowledge and skills toward Didactic Program in Dietetics verification. Application and integration of biology, physiology, and chemical parameters influencing specific medical conditions will facilitate evaluation of nutritional etiology and support for disease processes. Assessment, development of appropriate evidence-based nutritional interventions, and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated into the courses. Case studies and hands-on experiential learning experiences in anthropometric assessment and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated as the focus of the courses. Functioning as a member of a care-team will be stressed. Prerequisites: CHE-221/241, BIO-322/342, BIO-334/344, FN-611/612 or FN-260; and FN-620/621 or FN-340.

FN-615 Medical Nutrition Therapy, Assessment, and Counseling II (4.00 cr.)
Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year
FN-614/615 are to provide a culminating comprehensive study of the nutritional care process for graduate students seeking to obtain foundation knowledge and skills toward Didactic Program in Dietetics verification. Application and integration of biology, physiology, and chemical parameters influencing specific medical conditions will facilitate evaluation of nutritional etiology and support for disease processes. Assessment development of appropriate evidence-based nutritional interventions, and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated into the courses. Case studies and hands-on experiential learning experiences in anthropometric assessment and interviewing/counseling of the individual/group will be incorporated as the focus of the courses. Functioning as a member of a care-team will be stressed. Prerequisite: FN-614.

FN-620 Advanced Nutrient Metabolism I (2.00 cr.)
Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year
A study of the role of carbohydrates, fiber, and lipids in human nutrition and biology. Mechanisms of absorption, digestion, functions, requirements, and intermediary metabolism in cells with emphasis on integration with other nutrients and systems. Clinical significance, current issues, and critical analysis of the research and professional literature. Prerequisites: CHE-112/142 and BIO-322/342.

FN-621 Advanced Nutrient Metabolism II (2.00 cr.)
Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year
A study of the role of amino acids, protein, energy metabolism and food regulation in human nutrition and biology. Mechanisms of absorption, digestion, function, requirements, and intermediary metabolism in cells with emphasis on integration with other nutrients and systems. Clinical significance, current issues, and critical analysis of the research and professional literature. Pre- or Co-requisite: FN-620.

FN-625 Seminar in Nutrition (1.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall; Spring | Course Offered Every Year
A presentation-based course, the first part of the semester will be spent conducting a literature review on selected topics in the field. Students will develop oral presentations based on their literature review and will be required to develop and distribute a written abstract and bibliography on their topic. Corequisite: FN-610.

FN-627 Food and Society (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
Designed as a culminating experience in the program, this course is a critical examination of the social, political, economic and environmental influences on the American and global food system. Students will study the dominant and alternative methods for producing and distributing food to people, and the relationship between human health and the food supply. Students will propose solutions to problems involving the food system in a semester project. Prerequisites: FN-610; FN-611; FN-620/621; FN-625 (1hr); FCS-646.

FN-630 Nutrition Education and Counseling (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
An interactive course with students developing, reviewing and implementing various forms of nutrition education targeted to specific population groups. Students will develop, implement and evaluate nutrition education materials

FN-635 Gastronomy (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
Study of the various factors that contribute to pleasurable dining will be studied. Sensory evaluation will be conducted. Students will reflect upon their own experiences with food and dining, and using critical and analytical thinking skills they will develop a greater awareness of food. Readings will be discussed in terms of their contribution to the understanding of a food and dining experience.

FN-636 Sustainable Food Systems (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Spring | Course Offered Every Year
An examination of the relationships among diet, the various systems that produce our food, and the environment. Students will study the various agricultural and production methods and strategies for producing food, their impact on the natural environment, and sustainability. Students will connect personal dietary decisions to the broader social and global issues surrounding food, the environment, and health.

FN-646 Regression Analysis and Other Multivariate Models (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
This course begins with linear regression and building models for estimation and prediction in the biological sciences. The same concepts will be examined using multiple regression and residual analysis will be added. Topics also will include analysis of variance and covariance, basic concepts of experimental design, and ethical issues in data analysis and interpretation. Statistical software will be used.

FN-650 Vitamins, Minerals, and Nutraceuticals (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head
A study of the essential vitamins and minerals in humans, mechanisms of absorption, digestion, functions, requirements, metabolism, and current issues. A review of functional foods, phytochemicals, herbs, and other biologically active compounds in foods, and their relevance to the prevention and treatment of disease. Critical analysis of the research and professional literature. Prerequisites: CHE-112/142 or BIO-322/342.

FN-655 Nutrition and Physical Performance (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head
A study of diet and nutrition needs and assessment of athletes and physically active people, and the factors affecting diet and nutritional status in this population. Nutrition facts and fallacies in sport nutrition, efficacy of supplements, engineered foods, and ergogenic aids for the enhancement of physical performance. Prerequisites: CHE-112/142 or BIO-322/342.

FN-656 Obesity and Weight Management (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall | Course Offered Every Year
A comprehensive review of literature in the fields of overweight/obesity and its health consequences in child and adult cohorts. Program, policy, and position papers of organizations dealing with obesity will be evaluated. Strategies for weight management including diet, physical activity and behavior will be studied. Current research in treatment, pharmacological and surgical intervention.

FN-660 Food, Film and Culture (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head
Guided by social science theories, this course explores the connections between food and culture, as expressed through the media of film and writing, exploring the ways in which the use of food illuminates historical, sociocultural and environmental influences on food choices of cultural groups. The aim of the course is to find out what food, as depicted in film and writing, tells us about our world, our communities, and ourselves. Field experiences at local markets and food-service establishments provide hands-on experience with cultural foods.

FN-670 Practicum in Nutrition (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year
A supervised field experience with an organization, agency, business or other entity in the fields of food and nutrition or an applied project. Students will meet with a faculty supervisor to design a suitable field experience and establish measurable objectives and learning outcomes to be achieved at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisites: FN-610; FN-611 or FN-612; FN-620/612; FN-625 (1 hour); FCS-645; and permission of graduate advisor.

FN-675 Topics in Food, Nutrition and Dietetics (1.00 cr.)
Session(s): Varies, Contact Department Head | Course Offered Varies, Contact Department Head
Advanced study of a variety of current, new, and/or controversial topics in the field of foods, nutrition, and dietetics. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor.

FN -680 Thesis in Nutrition (3.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year
Research in nutrition and dietetics directed by a graduate committee. Prerequisites: FN-610; FN-611 or FN-612; FN-620/621; FN-625 (1 hour); FCS-645; and permission of graduate advisor.

FN-800 Graduate Study (1.00 cr.)
Session(s): Fall; Spring; Summer | Course Offered Every Year
Provides enrollment for students extending the thesis beyond FN-680 Thesis/Project and/or taking written comprehensive examinations but not registered for another course. May be repeated as needed.

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Strong Story | Chris Newport

Chris Newport, ’11, earned her Master of Science in Nutrition at Meredith College after completing Meredith's Dietetic Internship program and becoming a Registered Dietitian. As the owner of a sports nutrition and endurance coaching company, Chris pursued her master’s degree in order to more effectively serve her clients and help them reach their fitness goals.

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